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A REGULAR WORK SESSION OF THE VILLAGE COUNCIL OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD HELD IN THE SYDNEY V. STOLDT, JR. COURT ROOM OF THE RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE HALL, 131 NORTH MAPLE AVENUE, RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY ON FEBRUARY 5, 2020 AT 7:30 P.M.

 

  1. CALL TO ORDER – OPEN PUBLIC MEETINGS ACT – ROLL CALL – FLAG     SALUTE

 

Councilwoman Knudsen called the meeting to order at 7:30 P.M. and read the Statement of Compliance with the Open Public Meetings Act.  At roll call the following were present: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, and Walsh.  Also present were Heather Mailander, Village Manager/Village Clerk; Matthew Rogers, Village Attorney; and Donna Jackson, Deputy Village Clerk.  Mayor Hache was absent.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen led those in attendance in the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag as well as in a Moment of Silence to honor the brave men and women serving in our nation’s armed forces and all our first responders.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she wanted to apologize for last week’s meeting, as unbeknownst to all of them, she was sick, Councilman Sedon was sick, and Councilman Voigt was out of town, and there was no quorum.  She apologized to anyone who arrived at Village Hall expecting a meeting.

 

  1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

 

Walter Rothaug, 558 Hillcrest Road, stated that he was there to express his concern about an item which was on last week’s agenda which was the partial closing of the Ho-Ho-Kus hill link between Upper Ridgewood and Ho-Ho-Kus.  This is an important link between Upper Ridgewood and the businesses of Ho-Ho-Kus.  Upper Ridgewood would be considerably more isolated without it, and it is heavily used.  The link is more than 100 years old.  He added that he is questioning the credibility of New Jersey Transit as they don’t have a good record.  Mr. Rothaug stated that Ridgewood seems to have just found about this now, but Ho-Ho-Kus knew about it in May.  He added that he would like to know the results of a traffic study that they supposedly did.

 

Mr. Rothaug stated that they could make better signage, as it seems their concern is about trucks being on the crossing and the signs are rather small.  He added that painting could be done on the crossing itself to try to funnel the traffic across that.  They could do a lot to enhance the safety without closing or partially closing it.  He asked the Village Council to support Upper Ridgewood in this matter.

 

Bob Upton, 172 West Glen Avenue, Green Ridgewood Chair, stated that at the January 8th Village Council meeting a group of young ladies addressed them with a request to fully fund the Shade Tree Commission with $100,000 for the replacement of trees that have been lost over previous years.  They very well described the importance of trees to the environment and the community.  At the last meeting of Green Ridgewood, they voted to support the Shade Tree Commission and speak in support of them and ask that the Village Council allocate those funds and that they are used for the trees.

 

Mr. Upton stated that in a personal matter, he notices that there was a discussion about accidents at the intersection of Monroe and West Glen Avenue which is just up the road from his house and a number of measures were introduced.  Sergeant Chuck mentioned that a number of those accidents that happened westbound on West Glen, heading up the hill, were rear end collisions Mr. Upton is not entirely confident that the changes that were suggested would do anything for rear end collisions.  He suspected that a lot of those are due to excessive speed.  A flasher was installed on North Walnut and he wondered if that may also be a solution for West Glen to bring to people’s attention the speed that they are traveling.

 

Ron Rosenzweig, was there on behalf of his client Woodfield Realty Property Owners on the corner of West Ridgewood Avenue off of Wilsey Square, of which he is also the President of.  He understands there is a question which was addressed several months ago and he has been waiting for some additional answers regarding the parking spaces there.  He was there on behalf of his tenants West Side Bagel, Davis Surgical, and Puzo’s Pizza, who are all very dependent on those parking spaces for people to come into their stores for five or ten minutes to pick up.  Many senior citizens use the spots at Davis Surgical to come in and pick up surgical supplies.  The removal of those spots would greatly impact all of those businesses, which would impact his business as a landlord. 

 

Mr. Rosenzweig stated that he believes there have been studies done by the Police and aside from two small periods of time that there really isn’t a traffic problem there.  It seems to him that if those parking spots are going to be taken away, it has a great impact for what is two twenty minute periods of congestion, at best.  Those parking spots are the lifeblood of those businesses as they all depend on those spaces. 

 

Neil Sullivan, 335 East Ridgewood Avenue, stated that he has become an avid player of Pickleball and he learned taking lessons through the Ridgewood Recreation Department, and he wanted to thank the town for putting in a first class Pickleball court at Glen School.  One thing he noticed is that there are so many senior citizens playing, which he thinks is great.  He understands that it may have been discussed before, and he is sympathetic about the noise.  He wished the Village Council could compromise as there is going to be noise, but if that can be reduced to an acceptable level he would make that as a suggestion.

 

Doug Rhoten, 120 Melrose Place, stated that he is an avid Pickleball player and he pulled the noise resolution verbiage today and when he thinks of noise he thinks of it in a very objective way, but the ordinance explains it in a very subjective way.  A growing number of towns are making their resolutions very objective with decibel meters and there is a lot of material about this online.  They make alarms that shine a light when people are being too loud, and you can also limit the number of people on the Pickleball court.  When he listens outside of gyms where they play, he can’t hear the Pickleball, but he can hear the yelling.  He added that if there was a notice posted that talked about the noise and limited the number of people he thinks they would be doing themselves a favor.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if Mr. Rhoten was willing to share his research.  He stated that he sent it to the Parks Department today, but he would be happy to send it to anyone else.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if he would send it to the Village Clerk.

 

Anne Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated she was there to talk about the update on Graydon Pool hours of operation.  There was nothing in the yellow binder about it so she can only go on what has been said in previous meetings and the information she got from the Parks Department.  It was stated that they were going to reduce the weeks of Graydon because it was difficult to get guards.  This is completely wrong to do this, as she just saw an advertisement for a Parking Enforcement Officer in the newspaper, and there are no lives at stake when they are giving out tickets.  The Graydon guards have to go through extremely rigorous training, and they start at $9.50 an hour.  She thought that was below the minimum wage, but found that is the State minimum for part time.  She stated that was a low wage to pay people who hold the lives of all of the people of the pool. 

 

Ms. Lowry stated that her grandchildren take lessons at the Y and the instructors are adults.  She imagined that if they were paying the guards up to $18 an hour they might be able to get adults who don’t have to go back to school.  She added that Graydon actually makes money, and we need to spend a little more money to get guards so that the hours won’t be cut, as you can’t put the rates up and then cut the season by weeks.

 

Carolyn Jacoby, 160 Godwin Avenue, stated that she was there to thank the Village Council for the consideration and support for our critically important tree inventory.  She hoped that it could begin in a month or so, and they could have information regarding what our tree canopy is, and have information to be able to sustain it, grow it, and increase it.  As a member of the Shade Tree Commission, she thanked Bob Upton and the Green Team for their support.  She added that trees are a tremendous noise abatement vehicle around the Pickleball courts.  

 

Ian Keller, 140 Cottage Place, stated that he wanted to second Ms. Jacoby’s comments as he is on the Shade Tree Commission and they have done quite a bit of work to take all the steps necessary to have the tree inventory completed.

 

Joe Ferrante, 610 Hillcrest Road, stated that he was here about three years ago, and in five days the Willard community put together over 400 signatures of families who were opposed to disrupting the status quo of the Glenwood Road.  Many of those same families authored letters to the New Jersey Department of Transportation, which characterized the bulk of those letters as “expressions of inconvenience.” He feels this is not an inconvenience, but rather a significant disruption of an historic pattern between neighborhoods, and it is a cavalier attitude that the NJDOT has exhibited in the report he read.  Mr. Ferrante stated that this hill is a mode of transportation between neighborhoods almost predated by the railroad.  He added that you have to maintain that two way pattern to maintain the relationship.

 

Mr. Ferrante stated that he was concerned several years ago when this started that it was a bad starting point to settle on one-way.  He added that the starting point should be what would it take to preserve this very vital link between neighborhoods, and he wondered if the Village Council was willing to ask that question.

 

Mary Meekham, 630 Morningside Road, stated that Glenwood Road is part of her normal routine, she uses it daily and has been concerned about the traffic that is now going down and up that hill is now going to be diverted to Glen or Wyckoff Avenue.  A lot of traffic comes from the Ridgewood residents in her area getting off the train at night and having people pick them up.  There are so many different issues here, and there are going to be lines of cars standing and waiting to pick people up from the train.  She added that there are a lot of other intersections that she would consider more dangerous.

 

There were no additional comments from the public, and Councilwoman Knudsen closed public comments.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they are certainly looking at all options with the NJDOT and she is confident that everyone has read the documents quite thoroughly.  She added that at the outset when they started down this road three years ago, the Village Council’s expectation was that they were working to keep it open both ways and weren’t looking to negotiate anything on it.  She requested the Village Manager and Village Engineer OPRA any documents from the NJDOT any documents that substantiated the report.  They are doing anything possible.  Councilman Voigt added that he was really concerned, as this suddenly came out of the blue and they didn’t hear about it until a few weeks ago.  He sees it as a major disruption for that area and has concerns about where the traffic is going to go, especially for West Glen.  He is hoping they can do anything and everything to stop this and that includes more enforcement, and working with Ho-Ho-Kus to make that road safer and then work with NJDOT to stop this.

 

Councilwoman Walsh echoed the comments, adding that the bad behavior of some causes an effect on others.  Unfortunately, bad drivers caused some pretty severe issues in this situation.  She is hoping they can come to some sort of a resolution.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that in terms of the 15 minute parking spaces, she was under the impression that was just housekeeping issues.  Regarding Pickleball, they are just working with the acoustics. 

 

  1. MANAGERS REPORT

 

Hudson Street Garage – Ms. Mailander stated that the crane is there at Hudson Street, and they are moving the precast panels into place.  This part of the process is approximately seven weeks, intermittent, weather permitting.  There will be closures during the day on Hudson Street, and South Broad Street will be closed intermittently during the day.  Both roads will be open to traffic during the evening. 

 

Parking Rate Increase – Ms. Mailander stated that a parking rate increase went into effect on February 1st, which is $1.25 per hour on the streets and $1.00 per hour in the lots.

 

Village Council Candidate Packets – Village Council candidate packets are available in the Village Clerk’s Office.  The completed forms are due back to the Village Clerk’s Office by March 9th at 4:00 P.M.  There are three Village Council seats up for election.

 

Poll Worker on Election Day – Ms. Mailander stated that there is an opportunity to be a poll worker in the Village in Election Day.  It is $200 for the day, from 5:30 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. on June 2nd or November 3rd.  You must be at least 18 years old, a Bergen County resident, registered to vote, and must attend a two hour training class.  If interested, contact the Bergen County Board of Elections.  You could most likely work in Ridgewood, and perhaps even in your own neighborhood.

 

Parking Kiosks – Ms. Mailander stated that parking kiosks are being installed throughout the CBD, and should be completed by the end of February.  At the kiosks, you enter a license plate and pay using coins or credit card.  There is a 3% convenience fee for using a credit card.  You do not have to display the receipt.  The 15 minute parking spaces at the end of each side street will remain in effect with meters.

 

Village Office Closure – Ms. Mailander stated that Village Offices will be closed on February 12th in observance of Lincoln’s Birthday and February 17th in observance of President’s Day.  There will be no garbage or recycling pickup on these days and the Recycling Center will also be closed.

 

Life Guards at Graydon Pool – In preparation for the summer, there is a need for certified Life Guards at Graydon Pool.  The American Red Cross is advertising a waterfront lifeguard training at a sand bottom facility in May or June at Graydon Pool.  For more information, contact Ridgewood Recreation at The Stable.

 

Single Use Plastic Bags – Ms. Mailander stated that single use plastic bags are banned in Ridgewood.  This includes supermarkets, restaurants, street fairs, and farmers markets.  Certain plastic bags are exempt, and she thanked residents for helping preserve our environment.  

 

Village Council Upcoming Meetings – February 19th is the Public Meeting, February 26th is the Village Council Work Session, and March 4th is a Village Council Work Session.

 

  1. COUNCIL REPORTS

 

Ridgewood Library – Councilwoman Walsh stated that there was a Reorganization Meeting and the new slate is President, Gail Campbell; Vice President, Vic Aurora; Treasurer, Dan Cumming; and Secretary, Janis Fuhrman.  There was a lengthy discussion about the application for the library grant that has been offered by the State.  They are endeavoring to get all of the materials together as quickly as possible, including updated architect’s drawings to be able to bring back to the Village Council.

 

Citizen Safety Advisory Committee – Councilman Voigt stated that CSAC had its meeting on the 16th.  West Glen and Monroe residents attended and expressed concern about that intersection.  There is one opening on the committee that needs to be filled and several residents have expressed interest.  Interest continues to remain on the Franklin Avenue corridor upgrade and Chris Rutishauser provided them with an update on that. Councilman Voigt stated that Starbucks continues to be an issue with the driveway entrance and exits and he is hoping they can get that resolved fairly soon.

 

Community Center Advisory Board – Councilman Voigt stated that they met on the 23rd of January and a number of events are coming up.  The Taub Foundation will fund Age Friendly Ridgewood for two more years based on the good work they are doing.  Upcoming presentations and events include March 2nd, Soups On at Healthbarn from 11:30 A.M. to 1:00 P.M., $10 for residents, $20 for non-residents; March 3rd at 6:30 P.M. the Library auditorium they have an elder attorney presenting on elder issues; March 5th at 10:00 A.M. at the Community Center “From Suffrage to the ERA”, $5 per resident; April 22nd at 6:30 P.M. in the Library auditorium Medicare 101 with Sheila Brogan; May 6th at 7:00 P.M. Mary Creegan will present on her book.  Upcoming student mixers at the Community Center, April 17th 7:30 P.M. to 9:00 P.M. sixth grade mixer, music, and pizza; May 1st 7th and 8th grade silent disco; and May 29th 6:30 P.M. to 7:30 P.M. and 8:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.  There is Step Up for the 5th graders to meet future classmates at BF and GW.

 

Planning Board – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Planning Board meeting last night was canceled, however, the Master Plan Subcommittee did meet and went over a draft of the Visioning and Master Plan documents and right now they are in the process of making sure all of the data points are correct and the information is accurate.  They anticipate that will go to the Planning Board for review and the Committee will be doing a presentation before the Village Council in early March.

 

Arts Council – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Arts Council will meet Tuesday evening at 7:30 P.M. in the caucus room.  They are working on a sculptor exhibit in the off season at Graydon, and a project on the Parking Garage.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the next item is to convene the Special Public Meeting. 

 

At 8:11 P.M., Councilwoman Walsh made a motion to suspend the Work Session and convene the Special Public Meeting.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, and Walsh

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        Mayor Hache

ABSTAIN:      None

 

At 8:17 P.M., the Regular Work Session was reconvened.

 

  1. PRESENTATION

             

  1. NJ Future

 

Tonya Warbeck, Community Planning Manager at New Jersey Future, stated that she wanted to speak about the work that Ridgewood is doing in terms of age friendly community building.  She stated that NJ Future is a non-profit, non-government organization.  They are mission driven and their main concern is the responsible sustainable use of land, so they work to promote smart sustainable land use policies and practices.  Research into age friendly started a few years ago with funding from the Henry and Marilyn Taub Foundation where the question was how people can stay in their communities and be engaged and afford to be in the kinds of communities that New Jersey has being of a sprawling development type pattern in many places.  She stated that Ridgewood is in a good position because it is a rather compact kind of community form.  Ms. Warbeck stated that a research project was done and two reports were produced.  One called “Creating Places to Age in New Jersey” and another one about housing affordability regarding some towns in Northern New Jersey. 

 

Ms. Warbeck stated that the reason they are looking at the aging population specifically is because we are in the middle of a demographic shift right now, and there is an increase in the demographic of age 50 and older and in the next ten years we will see an increase in the demographic for 65 and older.  This is a result of the baby boomers aging into that older age group.  About 30% of the population in most communities in the state is now age 55 and older.  The question is how to meet the needs of this population.  Most surveys indicate that people would like to stay in their communities, preferably in their current home, or to have options to downsize in their community, and also to have opportunities to work or engage in their community. 

 

NJ Future has set out to evaluate communities in terms of meeting the needs in relation to land use patterns. Ms. Warbeck stated that they have developed a methodology to assess communities based on housing, transportation, mixed use center, and public spaces and amenities that are available.  The form of a community can determine whether it is harder or easier for a person to be able to stay in a community as they age and be able to stay engaged in a community as they age. 

 

Ms. Warbeck stated that types of the things that can be a barrier are housing, which is an issue for many people in the State in terms of mobility issues  and affordability, especially as our aging population moves into fixed incomes.  Auto dependency is an issue, as people tend to drive less as they age.  Having public spaces and gathering spaces for recreation, exercise, and community engagement is important.  These are the kinds of barriers that exist for people in communities.  New Jersey is a home rule state, so it is the municipal decision makers that set the vision for the community and the form it will take.  Ms. Warbeck stated that happens through master planning, visioning, zoning boards, planning, regulations, and capital budget, which are the things that a town can address or look at to help the aging population.

 

Ms. Warbeck stated that the NJ Future Aging Friendly Program has two components, one is doing land use assessments at the local level with municipalities, and the other is implementation planning.  Ridgewood has had an assessment done and now they are in the implementation planning phase with Ridgewood.  The assessment process is an engagement process.  They inform and engage the community through information sessions, and then through a project committee they prepare demographic profiles.  Then they engage the stakeholders both from the municipality as well as community stakeholders.  Ms. Warbeck stated that they get feedback through that engagement process to then go on and perform that aging friendly assessment which indicates recommendations.

 

Ms. Warbeck stated that with mixed use centers, they are looking for whether a town has a mixed use center, which is a downtown environment with retail and residential that would allow people to live closer to destinations and improves vibrancy of the downtown.  Their recommendations would be town specific for ways that the town could create that downtown environment with walkability being a priority, pedestrian oriented and a mix of uses.  Ms. Warbeck stated that with housing over 40% of New Jersey’s households are housing cost burdened meaning that they are spending more than 30% of their income on housing.  For older residents that is more than 50%.  Ridgewood is a little less than the State, but about 45% with the 65 and older population.  They are looking for options that are affordable, such as apartments and smaller units.

 

Ms. Warbeck stated that with transportation, they are looking to see if everyone needs a car to get around town.  They are looking for connectivity and whether other modes of transportation exist.  They also look at safety in terms of the number of lanes of traffic, speed of the road, and Complete Streets recommendations, as well.  Regarding public spaces and amenities, they are looking for an interconnected network so that people have a way to get out in the community easily.  The recommendations they make would be to enhance the existing facilities or fill the gaps for that network.

 

Ms. Warbeck stated that they created an assessment for the Village that was shared with the Village Council.  The next phase is the implementation planning.  It is important because it sets the blueprint for the steps that need to get done to meet the goals.  They identify specific things that could be done to achieve a specific goal.  It lays out who is responsible, the timeline, funding sources, and estimated costs.  This helps build support for the initiative and the projects, as well.  They are looking to have a well thought out plan for action to move forward.  With Ridgewood, they are doing public engagement tonight and will continue to do that, and then begin to identify the very specific action steps.  Then they want to continue to get that feedback from the municipality.

 

Ms. Warbeck stated that another part of this process is to lead this into the everyday municipal decision making, to think about these other aspects with this consideration of aging friendliness.  With implementation planning, they want to act on the strategies, engage the community, integrate these concepts, and promote the work.  They have the recommended strategies from the assessment, which are fairly general, and they want to bring those down to an actionable item.  They want to come up with smart objectives and then assess or prioritize that based on how much impact it will have and also how feasible it is.  They held a workshop and the project committee from Ridgewood, Teaneck, and Westwood were there.  Each of the recommendations from the assessment were written out and they got to come up with the top five priorities.

 

Ms. Warbeck stated that based on the discussion at this workshop, she developed a priorities matrix ranking the recommendations.  The project committee will present the resulting priority chart to the Village Council next month, and it is from that they will work to develop the implementation plan that has the action steps to get them closer to implementation for the high priority items on the list.  In terms of their timeline, they have formed the project committee, had the workshop, developed actions, and had a couple of follow-up meetings to finalize that implementation matrix.  She added that they are engaging the Village Council and she will be talking to the Planning Board.  She will work with the project committee to draft the implementation plan.  There are no obligations to implement, but these are things that have been determined as important for the aging population in the town.

 

Councilman Voigt stated that of the four top priorities, three have to do with walking and outdoors which says a lot about the Village in that people want to be outdoors and to exercise.  Ms. Warbeck stated that it is great the enthusiasm that the project team is showing.  Councilman Voigt added that with the new developments that are going to be opening, there are going to be a lot of people downtown and they are going to need to address the walkability.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that in addition to the walkability, she works with a lot of contractors who retired and then came back after realizing that they were too idle, so that is another thing that keeps coming up. 

 

Councilman Sedon stated that he was interested to know if they talked about taxes and if there were any creative solutions to lowering taxes as that seems to directly impact affordability.  Ms. Warbeck stated that is a great question as that is the crux of the problem, but she is in the process of compiling examples of innovative things that towns have done, including public-private partnerships.  As far as taxes, other than the State assistance, it is tricky.  They are compiling those kinds of resources and she will be sharing that when complete.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she had the same observations and they are facing some potential referendums in Ridgewood, and these are things that really need to be looked at and considered.  She added that people are living longer and are more capable, so they do look for employment opportunities in their community which gives an opportunity to socialize.

 

  1. DISCUSSION

             

  1. Ridgewood Water

 

  1. Award Sole Source Contract – Exchange of GAC Vessels at Carr Well

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Carr Treatment Plant came on-line after the installation of granular activated carbon treatment for the removal of PFAS compounds.  This filter media consists of carbon based product that is manufactured by Calgon Carbon Corporation of Pennsylvania.  That filter media will require replacement annually.  Therefore, Mr. Calbi’s recommendation is to award a sole source contract to Calgon Carbon in an amount not to exceed $128,000 for the year 2020.  Funding for the purchase is budgeted in the 2020 operating account. 

 

  1. Award Three Year Contract – Customer Billing Portal, Communications and Consumption Analytics Software

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they went out to bid for this.  One bid was picked up and one was received.  The sole bidder was Rio Supply of Sicklerville, New Jersey, who is a reseller of WaterSmart.  The recommendation is to award a three year contract to Rio Supply in the amount of $66,450 for year one, $43,800 for year two, and $45,060 for year three.  Funding is in the Water Utility Operating Budget of each year.  The first year is so high because there is a one-time setup fee of $23,700.

 

  1. Award Contract – National Co-Op Purchasing Agreement – Materials and Supplies

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was a resolution for the purchase of materials and supplies under the National Joint Powers Alliance Cooperative Purchasing Contract and for facilities, maintenance, repair and operating related supplies for safety related equipment and supplies, accessories, and services.  Ridgewood Water anticipates exceeding the statutory limit of $17,500 for these materials and therefore is in need of a Village Council resolution to purchase these items for 2020.  The award is to Granger, of Plainfield in an amount not to exceed $85,000.  This is in the water operating budget.

 

  1. Award Sole Source Contract – Furnish Corrosion Inhibitor

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Lead and Copper rule from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection mandates that Ridgewood Water maintain a Corrosion Control Program.  Corrosion control is the treatment process in which small amounts of phosphate inhibitors are added to the water in order to prevent corrosion.  They create a thin coating inside the plumbing materials and therefore prevents the erosion of lead and copper into the water.  In 2013, Ridgewood Water implemented a pilot program, utilizing poly-orthophosphate to control corrosion in the system.  Based on its success, Ridgewood Water installed the inhibitor ESC 532 at all of the active treatment facilities.  The installation was completed in April of 2016 and it is used at all points of entry for Ridgewood Water.

 

ESC Environmental uses a unique blend of polyphosphates and orthophosphate that is developed and distributed solely through their company.  Therefore, the recommendation is a sole source contract to ESC Environmental of Glenville, NY in the amount of $175,000 for the year 2020.  The funding is in the water operating account. 

 

  1. Parking

 

  1. Discuss Saturday Parking of Permit Holders in All Lots

 

Ms. Mailander stated that is has always been the policy that residents who purchase the Ridgewood Parking Permits can use them not only for commuting, but can also use the RPP at any time on the parking lots, whether it is in the evening or on a Saturday.  It has also been the policy that if they are parking with the RPP in the lots, that they can stay for as long as they wish, and not just for three hours.  The ordinance is not clear on these policies. The recommendation is to amend the ordinance to indicate that the RP may be used at any time, to park in the lots, without a time limit.  In addition, the amendment to the ordinance will indicate that the resident parking with the RPP in the lots cannot park in the shopper/diners or the CBD Employee parking spaces, except after 6:00 P.M. in the North Walnut lot.  This has been the policy since the RPPs were established.

 

Councilman Voigt asked if this is for the people who buy the permit for the Train Station. Ms. Mailander stated that it applies to everyone that has a permit.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if someone has the Chestnut Lot sticker can they park in the Train Station lot.  Ms. Mailander stated that on Saturdays and in the evenings they haven’t limited it, but they could.  Councilman Sedon stated that he wouldn’t limit it, as he can see the Train Station being a premium on a weekday, but on a Saturday a lot of people don’t commute.  Councilwoman Walsh agreed with Councilman Sedon. 

 

  1. West Ridgewood Avenue – 15-Minute Parking Spaces

 

Ms. Mailander stated that there are four parking spaces in front of the Wine Seller.  All four spaces have been memorialized in the Village Code, so they are all legal spaces.  There was a request from a resident who felt that there was a backup there.  It usually happens in the morning for around 20 minutes and around 3:30 P.M. for about 20 minutes according to the study done by the Police Department.  They went to the local businesses who said that they would be very concerned if these spaces were removed due to the fact that people use them to go into the stores quickly. 

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she was having a problem seeing where the four spaces were.  Ms. Mailander stated they were between Washington Place and Wilsey Square.  Councilman Sedon stated that he would be in favor of keeping it as it is.  Councilman Voigt stated that he was okay keeping the spaces.  Councilwoman Knudsen and Councilwoman Walsh discussed the exact location of the spaces.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that there needed to be a better explanation of the location of the spaces.  Ms. Mailander stated that could be amended to make it more clear.

 

  1. Budget

 

  1. Award State Contract – Portable Radios – Police Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is a resolution for the purchase of ten portable radios under State Contract and the vendor is Motorola Solutions, Inc. of Paramus.  It is an amount not to exceed $31,660.50 and is being paid for through the Police Department’s capital budget.  These new radios will better interface with the radio system, and have better fidelity of transmissions in higher noise environments.  It is part of a multi-year replacement program and after this purchase, a little over half of the officers will have upgraded portable radios.

 

Councilwoman Walsh asked if when mechanicals like this are purchased, there is a warranty, but is there a life expectancy.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would find out.

 

  1. Award Professional Services Contract – 2020 Tax Assessment Map

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is an annual contract for professional land surveying services for the certification, survey work supervision, and assistance with preparation of the Village of Ridgewood Tax Assessment Map for 2020.  The vendor is Daniel Dunn of Waldwick, and the amount is not to exceed $1,700, which has remained the same amount for the last ten years.  The retainer provides the Village with a New Jersey Professional Land Surveyor to endorse our tax maps and provide the license coverage for the survey work the staff of the Engineering Division prepares for various construction projects and regulatory submittals.  It will be paid out of the operating budget.

 

  1. Award Contract – Coach Bus Transportation Services – 2020 Senior Day Trips

 

Ms. Mailander stated that there was a bid in January accepted for Coach Bus Transportation Services for Senior Day Trips.  Five packets were emailed to vendors for their consideration and two were received.  Of the two bids, one of the bids was received late, and mailed back unopened.  It ended up being one sole bid from Panorama Tours, Inc. of Wallington.  It is an amount not to exceed $11,080 for the 2020 trips.  They have worked with Panorama Tours in the past, and were consistently on time with professional and courteous drivers.

 

  1. Award Contract – Diesel Exhaust Removal System – Fleet Garages

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Fleet Services Division received three informal written quotes for that project.  They are recommending the award of the work to Clean Air Company, Inc. of Fords, New Jersey, in the amount of $20,586.03 as the lowest responsible quote.  It will be paid for through the capital budget.

 

  1. Award Contract – New Jersey Co-Op Purchasing Program – GIS Mapping – Parks Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is the Shade Tree Inventory, and Ridgewood Parks and Recreation and the Shade Tree Commission have partnered together.  This will help us better understand the composition, structure, and maintenance needs of what we have, allocate resources, and qualify for financial grant assistance developed with management strategies.  Using a GIS mapping unit in the field collection to identify various characteristics of each street tree.  The anticipated visual assessment of approximately 12,000 shade trees will be conducted through state contract holder, Civil Solutions of Hammonton, and their partner Davey Resource Group.  It is an amount not to exceed $56,215.  A recent grant that the Village received in the amount of $10,000 will be put towards this as well as $50,000 funding which has been verified in the capital budget account.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it was important to point out that these are Village owned street trees.  Councilman Sedon added that we don’t even know exactly how many street trees we have; it is just anecdotal evidence from people who have worked in the Village and drove around.

 

  1. Declare Property Surplus – 2011 Ford Crown Victoria – Police Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this vehicle is in constant need of repair and the cost of repair exceeds the value of the vehicle.  The Fleet Department has inspected it and agrees that it cannot be repaired or rehabilitated.  It went from the Police Department to the Building Department and now it is in a condition where it really can’t be used by any of the other Departments.  It will be declared surplus and turned over to Enterprise LLC and sold at public auction according to State law.  Proceeds from the sale will be credited to the Ridgewood Police Department account with Enterprise.  Councilwoman Walsh asked if this was the last Crown Victoria.  Ms. Mailander stated that they may have another one.

 

  1. Award Contract – Installation, Service and Repair of Police Vehicle Equipment and Radios

 

Ms. Mailander stated this is Police, Fire, and Emergency Services and is for the maintenance of emergency radios, equipment, vehicle computer systems for those three Divisions.  This is the second optional year of a contract and it will be awarded to the original sole bidder, Regional Communications of Paramus, not to exceed $30,000.

 

  1. 2019 Appropriation Reserve Transfer Resolution

 

Ms. Mailander stated this is an annual resolution which transfers money from those Departments which have extra money to those that do not have enough money to pay the 2019 bills.

 

  1. Capital Ordinance – Paving of South Broad Street

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this will be a bond ordinance for a total of $216,000.  The Village received a $210,000 grant from the New Jersey Department of Transportation for this, but we have to appropriate the full amount and then get reimbursed. We will take $6,000 from the general capital fund balance account.

 

  1. Capital Ordinance – Paving of Spring Avenue

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is a total of $180,000 and the Village received an NJDOT grant in the amount of $175,000.  We will take $5,000 from the general capital fund balance account.

 

  1. Deferred School Tax

 

Ms. Mailander stated this is an annual resolution and it allows for the maximum deferral which is the most favorable position to take since it increases the Village’s fund balance account and will help offset any restrictions from reserve accounts which may arise from 2018 financial operations.

 

  1. Resolutions to Amend Capital Budget

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for the two paving projects, South Broad Street and Spring Avenue.  They have to amend the temporary capital budget because we haven’t adopted our final capital budgets yet.

 

  1. Award Contract – State Co-Op Purchasing Program – 2019 Ford F250 – Water Pollution Control

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Water Pollution Control Division has residual capital funds budgeted for vehicles.  The pickup to be replaced is a 2009 Ford F-250 identified as truck WP-53, which has significant underbody corrosion due to the environment at the plant.  The purchase is through the New Jersey State Cooperative Purchasing Program through the Route 23 Automall of Butler, in an amount not to exceed $36,846.

 

  1. Award Contract – Drainage System at 220 Chestnut Street – Fleet Garages

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Streets/Fleet Services Division solicited and received three informal written quotes to make corrections to our drainage system at 220 Chestnut Street.  They recommend the award of work to ConQuest Construction, Inc. of Westwood in the amount of $26,430.

 

  1. Award Contract – Printing for Municipal Election

 

Ms. Mailander stated that because this is a Municipal Election, the Village pays for all printing, which includes the election materials, ballots, and labels for the sample ballots.  They deliver to the Post Office, and print the sample mail-in ballots in English, Spanish, and Korean.  Election expenses are exempt from the public bidding law.  The Village used Royal Printing Service for the 2016 and 2018 Municipal Elections and the referendum election held in 2016.  Ms. Mailander stated that they have been very pleased with their work and they have also been used by Bergen County for the printing of the Primary and General elections for several years.  The quote is $19,800 for the printing, which is the same amount they charged in 2018.  She recommended the award to Royal Printing Service of West New York, NJ.

 

  1. Declare Surplus – Various Equipment – Parks and Recreation

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was for various equipment to be declared surplus, and is being sold through municibid.com which is approved under the State purchasing system.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they knew how old all of this equipment is.  Ms. Mailander stated they could find out.

 

  1. Update on Status of Bathrooms at Graydon Pool

 

Ms. Mailander stated that Connolly and Hickey worked on the overall scheme for the Graydon Pool bathrooms which are getting upgraded, painted, and will have new fixtures.  The partitions between each of the changing areas and bathroom stalls started to disintegrate when the contractor removed them as part of their work.  Connolly and Hickey had thought they would be fine to put back in, but they have realized they can’t do that.  It is $30,000 for the new partitions so that everything is going to look upgraded.  They have to do a change order for $30,000 and the contractor said they could try to use the old ones but they may not stay up.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that her opinion is they are doing the work and in the long run it might cost us more, so while they are doing the work right now let’s get it done correctly.  Ms. Mailander added that it should last decades after this, and there is a May 1st deadline.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they could get an update on the historic designation of Graydon Pool.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would get that update.

             

  1. Policy

 

  1. Revisit Winter Door Enclosure Ordinance – Extend Time Period

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Village Council proposed an ordinance to permit winter door enclosures in the CBD with dates of January 1st to February 28th or 29th.  The Planning Board had recommended December 1st because it is the restaurant industries’ busy holiday season, and it is cold enough to warrant the use during that time.  In speaking with the restaurant owners, the enclosures are expensive and the additional month would allow them to get more use from them.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she gets what they are saying and they are expensive, but she asked what the dates are on the outdoor café.  Ms. Mailander stated that right now it is March 1st to November 30th.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she still thinks it’s good to have a little time where they see the sidewalk and that was the basis for even amending the outdoor café ordinance.  She added that they find that the sidewalks really do need to be inspected and have some attention.  Ms. Mailander suggested December 10th. Councilwoman Walsh stated that the way she looks at it, the whole reason that they are doing this is to keep inclement weather out when doing a transition and opening the door.  If the intent is to have this up in the coldest part of the year, it would make sense to have December, January, February.  Councilman Sedon suggested December 10th to give some time to look at the sidewalk.

 

Mr. Rogers suggested that as part of the process for doing the permitting either for the outdoor cafes or for the winter door enclosures they could make sure that since the responsibility and the liability for the sidewalks in the commercial area are with the property owner, you could make sure that they get inspected when they apply for the permit and to make it part of the administrative process.  The Village Council agreed with that recommendation.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they would make it December 1st and then add that there will be an inspection and repair as part of the application process.  Councilwoman Walsh agreed.  Ms. Mailander stated that it probably should be done when they get their outdoor café permit, as they can do the repairs then.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the inspection should then be part of every outdoor café permit.  Ms. Mailander agreed.

 

  1. Occupancy Ordinance

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that she included in everyone’s packet information about occupancy ordinances in other municipalities.  The fire code for residences was included, as well as an article that showed what happens when planning isn’t done before.  We have a downtown that is going to be full, so she wanted to get a jump on this before that point.  Most towns do an occupancy ordinance to ensure that developments adhere to existing guidelines.  It talks about square footage of units and the HUD guidelines.  She met with Mr. Rutishauser and they spoke about the sewage lines that go down Franklin Avenue and he assured her that they have capacity to handle all of the proposed units that are under construction at this time.  In terms of fire safety and what was proposed, they follow these guidelines and there wouldn’t be anything out of the ordinary proposed in their ordinance.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it was a complicated process when they expanded the sewer line, and there had been some discussion about the occupancy ordinance and she thinks they should definitely have one.  Councilman Voigt stated that he agreed and there was agreement among the rest of the Village Council.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that this would have to go to the Planner and then discuss the process involved.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that out of all of them, she liked the way Allendale did it because they set it up in a way that was very understandable.  When the applications came to the Planning Board, they proposed the different unit sizes based on these other Uniformed Construction Codes and the HUD.  Councilwoman Knudsen agreed. 

 

Mr. Rogers stated that they should contact the Planner and have them look at it and how it fits into our scheme of things.  Ms. Mailander asked if it would go to the Planning Board.  Mr. Rogers stated that it wasn’t necessarily land use, but was more construction.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would give the Planner the packet and then look at something similar to Allendale’s.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that Ramsey wasn’t much different, but the grid that Allendale provided was easy to understand.

 

  1. Accept Donation to Community Center – North Jersey Masters

 

Ms. Mailander stated that each year volunteers that are made up of Parks and Recreation staff and family members host a water table on Fairfield Avenue for the runners of the 10k during the run.  As a thank you, North Jersey Masters donates some of the proceeds to the Community Center to help fund programs, as needed.  They are donating $1,000 and North Jersey Masters does not have any applications before any Ridgewood Board or Committee at this time.

 

  1. Update on Pickleball Courts – Acoustiblok

 

Ms. Mailander stated that she sent the Village Council additional information on the Acoustiblok fence that is being proposed for the Pickleball courts at Glen School regarding sound studies that were done with and without acoustic fences and showing the reduction in the noise levels achieved.  Noise was reduced ten to twelve decibels in a sound meter test conducted by the US Pickleball Association and this is more than a 50% reduction in sound.  Councilman Voigt had asked about a trial period to rent them, but they don’t do that.  However, if we are not happy with their product, they will refund the Village’s money less the cost of shipping the product back to them which is approximately $1,100.  They are convinced that this is going to be something that is going to benefit along with the muted balls, so they are hoping to award the contract and get this installed before the courts open.

 

Councilman Voigt asked what the warranty is on this.  Ms. Bigos stated that she would have to get back to them on that.  Ms. Mailander shared samples with the Village Council.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they could use the black color.  Councilwoman Walsh was worried about impacting the view into the courts in terms of safety.  Ms. Bigos stated that was already happening because there are windscreens on all courts right now, which are only two feet shorter than the panels coming in.  She added that it is opaque, but you would be able to see people’s legs at the bottom.  It has been designed to have the parking lot visible so that you will see the courts from the parking lot and the wall would be on the three sides adjacent to the homeowners’ properties.

 

Councilman Sedon asked if there was room to plant additional trees there.  Ms. Bigos stated that was something that she and Ms. Mailander discussed earlier today when they reviewed the Department budget.  Additional shrubs by municipal courts is something that she and the new Parks Supervisor are looking into. Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it appears from the photos that there is a tremendous amount of obstruction that already exists from the shrubbery that is there.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that was another location.

 

  1. Update on Graydon Pool Hours of Operation

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they have sent out to area high schools as well as to area colleges the help wanted advertisement for lifeguards.  The hourly rate varies depending on if they have worked here previously.  The rate of $10.43 is the low end and we are proposing $11 for the low end, and the salary goes up for those who have been here longer.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that to Ms. Loving’s point, if they were to increase the amount slightly, would they attract older applicants and is that something they should look at.  Ms. Mailander stated that increasing the pay, increases the budget, and ultimately taxes.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that she doesn’t believe in age discrimination.

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that if they were going to limit the season by a week they would have to discount the amount.  Ms. Mailander stated that this was a proposal and the reason is safety due to the lack of lifeguards.  They are hoping increasing the pay will gather lifeguards, and are doing an aggressive campaign to get more lifeguards.  There has also been contact with one of the swim teams at a local high school.  The minimum age is 16.  She added that there is training, and they have to be able to get up into the lifeguard chair.

 

Ms. Bigos stated that there is a prerequisite in order for them to start the lifeguarding course.  They have to be able to swim a mile and then other physical endurance tests.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that there are older adults that can meet those expectations, to which Ms. Mailander agreed.  Councilman Sedon asked if there was a thought to go out to a temporary employment agency.  Ms. Bigos stated that she wasn’t sure about that but they have gone out to Montclair, William Paterson, Ramapo, Bergen Community, Ridgewood High School, Franklin Lakes, Midland Park, Northern Highlands, Paramus, Waldwick, Ramsey, Mahwah, Glen Rock, Elmwood Park, the New Jersey Pool Manager’s Association, and various other contacts.  She added that they always start accepting applications for returning staff on March 1st and are ready to accept them.  Training is set and she has been in contact with the YMCA that does a waterfront program, but Graydon is black water and they offer to lifeguards the opportunity to take a bridge course to be certified in our facility with our staff and rescue procedures.

 

Councilman Sedon stated that that sounds like they went out extensively, and he agreed with Councilwoman Walsh that if they do have to limit the season there should be some type of reimbursement.  Ms. Bigos stated that they have been creative in the past, where there have been times where they have closed the section along Maple Avenue and maybe have people in the kiddie area, or sunbathe at the deep end without going in the water.  At the end of the season she sits with her management staff and they critique the summer.  One of the concerns that comes up every year is the three preseason weeks where college staff are in but work a double shift.  The Department of Health licenses Graydon and performs inspections, so they abide by those rules and regulations.  Councilwoman Knudsen encouraged using social media.

 

  1. Vehicle Anti-Idling Policy

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Village Council adopted a resolution in 2009 to put into place a policy that prohibits vehicles from idling, which is part of Sustainable Jersey.  It requires renewal every ten years.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that there are signs in certain places in town where she was told there are cars idling and she noticed in those areas there were no signs.  She asked if residents could recommend if they see people idling.  Ms. Mailander stated she would like to know the locations.  Councilman Sedon stated that he heard the same thing.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked how that impacts people who have the remote start.  Ms. Mailander stated that it is a resolution because it is a policy.

 

  1. Amendment to Single-Use Plastic Bag Ordinance

 

Ms. Mailander stated that although the ordinance is very comprehensive, so far they have found a couple of issues that have arisen.  The current ordinance does not specify if the plastic bags that can be used 125 times must have that printed on the bag itself.  The recommendation is that as long as they can get a distributor’s letter that it can be used 125 times, that would be okay, and that it wouldn’t have to be printed on the bag itself.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she was so proud of our Village because she sees everybody with their bags going into different shops throughout town, and it definitely is something that many are embracing.

 

Ms. Mailander added that there is no section of the ordinance that states the enforcement officers regulations and the recommendation is that it be modeled somewhat after Paramus who says that the Health Officer has the authority to enforce the ordinance.  She added that they also recommend that the Health Department be able to check the bags during twice a year.  Restaurant inspections and stores that are not food establishments would not be inspected, per se, however if there were a complaint filed they would do it on a complaint.  The thought is there would be some kind of flyer handed out to all of the establishments so they would be aware of it.  Ms. Mailander added they need to define the fine, and leave it up to the Judge, or specify an amount.

 

Councilman Sedon asked if there have been many cases in front of the Judge.  Ms. Mailander stated that there haven’t been any cases yet, and there was just one situation where they weren’t sure if the bag was complaint, but then they did accept a distributor’s letter.  Mr. Rogers stated that he thinks from a fine standpoint, it is usually best to give direction to the court and also state as a matter of law the type of exposure.  He recommended taking a look at other towns in terms of what their findings are and what their schedules may be on fines, and see if they find those appropriate for what they want to project here in Ridgewood.  The other side is that once they do that, they can also take a look and say a fine is no less than a certain amount for this offence and still leave it to the discretion of the court as far as where to go with that.  Councilman Sedon agreed with that.  Ms. Mailander stated that they would probably bring it back at the end of February or beginning of March.  

 

  1. Multi-Family Housing Informational Banners

 

Ms. Mailander stated that Mr. Rutishauser was approached about the possibility of temporarily waiving the sign limitation, as each of the construction sites would like to be able to provide people driving by with information about the project and who to contact for more information.  In addition, Mayor Hache had said that he was interested in having banners put up by the development so that people knew what was going to be built there.  Mr. Rutishauser indicated that perhaps they should suspend the enforcement of sign regulations for the banners and they would still have to pay a fee for the real estate sign.  Councilman Sedon stated that it seems that the banner would just be a real estate sign.  Ms. Mailander stated that they have received a lot of calls about who people should contact if they are interested in renting, and the Village really doesn’t have that information, at all. This would help if someone were passing by.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that this would add to confusion as people would have to slow down to read it.  Councilman Voigt stated that he was concerned with how long the signs would stay up.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that it said 210 days.

 

Mr. Rogers stated that he would be concerned about allowing banners for certain apartments or units that are being developed and not others that are not the same type of development.  Providing advertising for these developments is a stretch sometimes in terms of municipal assistance.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that in Morristown they have a simple sign, and when you go to that company’s website it takes you to the realtor’s site, and then it is their responsibility to provide the information on the website.  She added that she didn’t know if the Village rules were specific for a real estate sign in terms of what it could say.  Ms. Mailander stated that she knows it is for 30 days and then they could renew it for additional periods of 30 days.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she would imagine the developers would put up a small sign that has a website and social media details.  Ms. Mailander asked if they would allow a sign on each one.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that whatever out current code is, applies to those sites, as well. 

 

  1. Operations

 

  1. Appoint Clean Communities Coordinator and Recycling Coordinator

 

Ms. Mailander stated that these will be Sean Hamlin, retroactive to November 1, 2019.

 

  1. Approve Joining Somerset County Co-Op Pricing System

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this offers pricing for heavy truck repairs for work outside the scope of our Fleet Division mechanics, and has several vendors they customarily do business with.  Mr. Rutishauser has recommended that the Village join this cooperative because it will be the fastest way to obtain truck repair services that Fleet Services needs and have been competitively bid in the past.  The Village needs a resolution to join and also allow the execution of the agreement by the Mayor and Village Manager.

 

  1. Update on NJDOT Decision – Warren Avenue/Glenwood Road

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the report goes through what happened, which is that they proposed recommendations, had comments from Ridgewood residents, the Ho-Ho-Kus Chamber of Commerce, and the Village Council adopted a resolution.  Therefore, it was sent to the Exception Review Committee at NJ Transit comprised of various high level people, and they evaluated and decided to create an enforcement/non-enforcement trial period.  They then received an evaluated follow-up report from the enforcement/non-enforcement trial period in April 2019 in which they rendered a decision to establish Warren Avenue as one way.  Therefore, the Commissioner of the DOT based upon that Memorandum of Record says that they adopt the recommendations of that team.  According to the Administrator in Ho-Ho-Kus, they have never wavered from closing or one-way.  They started out saying they were going to close it completely and then because of the comments they decided that one-way would be a compromise.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Administrator believes they are planning to put shovels in the ground early summer.  There are going to be times when it is closed anyway because they are going to be doing improvements to the track area, as well as the Village having to eventually create Glenwood Road as a one-way in the eastbound direction.  It is about 2.5 to 3 years of construction to the track bed, drainage, and there are quite a few other things they are going to have to do.  She added that Village residents are still very concerned, and she understands.

 

Councilman Voigt asked how they could have better communication with Ho-Ho-Kus as it seems to be they are the ones talking with NJDOT.  Ms. Mailander stated that they have been good in telling us, and got the Village invited to the meeting when it was initially discussed.  NJDOT, in her mind, mistakenly thinks this is a Ho-Ho-Kus issue only.  Councilman Voigt stated that he was having a hard time understanding how the Ho-Ho-Kus person was rendering opinions and decisions on the people that live up in the Willard School District.  Ms. Mailander stated that he wasn’t rendering decisions. Councilman Voigt stated that he was making recommendations on changes that are going to effect a lot of people.  Ms. Mailander stated that he wasn’t making a decision, it is NJDOT and NJ Transit.  Councilman Voigt asked how do they get the Village inserted into the discussions.  He finds it incomprehensible that these huge tractor trailers go up this hill.  A few months ago he stopped a huge bus trying to go up the hill.  There is an issue with GPS that needs to be fixed and could help immensely.  He added that the enforcement by the Village and Ho-Ho-Kus could help immensely, and they need to figure a way to fix this with NJDOT. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that her concern is that it says “further directs” so she asked if the Village continued the conversation, would they consider punitive damages to close the road and put the Village in a bind.  Ms. Mailander stated that they still have that option.  Councilman Voigt stated that he talked with a representative who said that they didn’t know the ramifications that it would have on the surrounding streets.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she knows that at one point they talked about putting up a height restriction gate.  Maybe they could compile a list of additional measures that they could implement to help them understand that the Village recognizes their concerns, but that by taking this type of an action they may be fixing a perceived safety hazard but may actually be creating other safety hazards.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would talk to Mr. Rutishauser about that.

 

Councilwoman Walsh asked if there was a way they could count the cars that come back and forth every day this week as that would be helpful.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they dispatched the portable signage.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that goes back to bad behavior as people do that all over the Village.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that we need to see more of their reports and observations.  Councilman Voigt added that he thinks they need to get themselves more involved in this process.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she was stunned when she saw this, as if they implemented certain safeguards and they never heard from the NJDOT.  The point was to keep it open both ways, and this came out of left field for her.  Ms. Mailander stated that she contacted the Administrator in Ho-Ho-Kus and he stated that this was the only report that he received in May.  Councilwoman Knudsen agreed with Councilwoman Walsh’s point to do the counter and put up signage.  Councilman Voigt added they should also count the trucks that go up and down the hill, as that is a major problem that needs to be resolved.

 

  1. REVIEW OF FEBRUARY 19, 2020 PUBLIC MEETING AGENDA

 

The following is a review of the February 19, 2020 Public Meeting Agenda.

 

Proclamations include: Dad’s Night Days – Hawes School and Somerville School; Read Across America Day; and Super Science Saturday.

 

Resolutions: Authorize Temporary Capital Budget – Maple Park Field Lighting; and Authorize Temporary Capital Budget – Paving.

 

Resolutions for Ridgewood Water: Award Sole Source Contract – Corrosion Inhibitor; Award Sole Source Contract – Exchange of GAC Vessels at Carr Well; Title 59 Approval – Customer Billing Portal, Communications and Consumption Analytics Software; Award Contract – Customer Billing Portal, Communications and Consumption Analytics Software; and Award Contract Under National Cooperative Purchasing Contract – Materials and Supplies.

 

Ordinances for Introduction: 3781 – Bond Ordinance – Maple Park Field Lighting; 3782 – Bond Ordinance – Paving of South Broad Street; and 3783 – Bond Ordinance – Paving of Spring Avenue.

 

Ordinances for Public Hearing include: 3775 – Bond Ordinance – Street Paving and Streetscape, Security for Village-Owned Facilities and Buildings; 3776 – Parking Utility Bond Ordinance – Environmental Cleanup for Hudson Street Parking Lot; 3777 – Amend Chapter 212 – Parks and Recreation Areas – Rules and Regulations for Tennis Courts – Pickleball; 3778 – Amend Chapter 190 – Land Use and Development – Requirements for Lettering on Signs; 3779 – Amend Chapter 165 – Garbage, Refuse and Recycling – Bulk Refuse Definitions; 3780 – Amend Chapter 165 – Garbage, Refuse and Recycling – Container Specifications & Setout Requirements.

 

Resolutions include: Approve 2019 Budget Reserve Transfers; Award Contract – Diesel Exhaust Removal System – Fleet Services Garages; Award Contract – Printing for Municipal Election; Award Contract – Sound Panels for Glen Pickleball Courts; Title 59 Approval – Coach Bus Transportation Services – 2020 Senior Day Trips; Award Contract – Coach Bus Transportation Services; Title 59 Approval – Installation, Service and Repair of Police, Fire and EMS Equipment and Radios; Award Contract Under State Contract – Portable Radios; Award Contract Under State Contract – GIS Mapping Services for Tree Inventory; Award Contract Under State Contract – 2019 Ford F250 – Water Pollution Control Facility; Award Contract – Drainage System at 220 Chestnut Street – Fleet Services Garage; Award Professional Services Contract – 2020 Land Surveying Services Retainer for Preparation of Tax Assessment Map; Authorize Membership in Somerset County Cooperative Pricing System; Deferred School Tax; Accept Donation for Community Center for North Jersey Masters; Confirm Commitment to Anti-Idling of Village Vehicles; Accept and Authorize Execution of Bergen County Grant for Lighting at Maple Park Field; Appoint Clean Communities Coordinator; Appoint Recycling Coordinator; and Declare Property Surplus – Police Department Vehicle.

 

  1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

 

Boyd Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that he just wanted to make a couple of comments about Graydon Pool regarding the bathroom renovation project.  Perhaps their inspection process could be better with the roof and some underlying defects.  Regarding the modesty panels, at first sight it is clear that the panels are made of what the contractor cited.  So, this $30,000 they are spending and he takes issue with these contractors that always find something later on.  He asked if they could negotiate it to be a better price because in his opinion they are partly at fault for not seeing this.

 

Mr. Loving added that he echoed the thoughts of Councilwoman Knudsen that social media is key when attempting to get young people to come to anything.  He understands the Director’s concern that sometimes the advertisement isn’t accurate, but if the Parks Department is making it themselves and posting it themselves, why not do that.  He is a regular user of social media and he has seen not one advertisement for lifeguards at Graydon. 

 

Mr. Loving stated that he was driving eastbound on Robinson Lane one day and he noticed that every time you come to a corner there are three stop signs on every corner.  He asked Mr. Rutishauser if that is in compliance with the universal traffic code, and if it isn’t is the Village opening itself up to some type of liability.  He asked the Village Manager to follow up and for Mr. Rogers to, as well.  He added that at Kenilworth and Spring there are also three stop signs.

 

Bob Upton, 172 West Glen Avenue, stated that as far as the plastic bag ban and requiring merchants to have a letter confirming that their bags meet the 125 uses, he can see that it would be unreasonable for them to get the certification printed on the bag but he would encourage them to ensure with a product number that the bag and letter are tied together.

 

There were no additional comments from the public, and Councilwoman Knudsen closed public comment.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if the bids were all based on the same information from Connolly and Hickey, and all of the bid specifications that were responded to were all on the exact same information.  Regarding the signage, the Kenilworth issue was after a number of really bad accidents, but her recollection is because they wanted to do a four way stop but that wasn’t consistent with the Uniform Traffic Code, and from her observation it has been a significant improvement with the three signs, but they will double check the compliance.

 

  1. RESOLUTION TO GO INTO CLOSED SESSION

 

Deputy Village Clerk, Donna Jackson read Resolution #20-27 to go into Closed Session as follows:

 

 

  1. ADJOURNMENT

 

There being no further business to come before the Village Council, on a motion by Councilman Sedon, seconded by Councilman Voigt, and carried unanimously by voice vote, the Village Council’s Work Session was adjourned at 10:33 P.M.

 

 

 

 

 

______________________________

                                                                                                      Susan Knudsen                            

                                                                                                                   Deputy Mayor                   

 

 

 

______________________________

              Donna M. Jackson

           Deputy Village Clerk

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A REGULAR WORK SESSION OF THE VILLAGE COUNCIL OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD HELD IN THE SYDNEY V. STOLDT, JR. COURT ROOM OF THE RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE HALL, 131 NORTH MAPLE AVENUE, RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY ON FEBRUARY 5, 2020 AT 7:30 P.M.

 

  1. CALL TO ORDER – OPEN PUBLIC MEETINGS ACT – ROLL CALL – FLAG     SALUTE

 

Councilwoman Knudsen called the meeting to order at 7:30 P.M. and read the Statement of Compliance with the Open Public Meetings Act.  At roll call the following were present: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, and Walsh.  Also present were Heather Mailander, Village Manager/Village Clerk; Matthew Rogers, Village Attorney; and Donna Jackson, Deputy Village Clerk.  Mayor Hache was absent.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen led those in attendance in the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag as well as in a Moment of Silence to honor the brave men and women serving in our nation’s armed forces and all our first responders.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she wanted to apologize for last week’s meeting, as unbeknownst to all of them, she was sick, Councilman Sedon was sick, and Councilman Voigt was out of town, and there was no quorum.  She apologized to anyone who arrived at Village Hall expecting a meeting.

 

  1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

 

Walter Rothaug, 558 Hillcrest Road, stated that he was there to express his concern about an item which was on last week’s agenda which was the partial closing of the Ho-Ho-Kus hill link between Upper Ridgewood and Ho-Ho-Kus.  This is an important link between Upper Ridgewood and the businesses of Ho-Ho-Kus.  Upper Ridgewood would be considerably more isolated without it, and it is heavily used.  The link is more than 100 years old.  He added that he is questioning the credibility of New Jersey Transit as they don’t have a good record.  Mr. Rothaug stated that Ridgewood seems to have just found about this now, but Ho-Ho-Kus knew about it in May.  He added that he would like to know the results of a traffic study that they supposedly did.

 

Mr. Rothaug stated that they could make better signage, as it seems their concern is about trucks being on the crossing and the signs are rather small.  He added that painting could be done on the crossing itself to try to funnel the traffic across that.  They could do a lot to enhance the safety without closing or partially closing it.  He asked the Village Council to support Upper Ridgewood in this matter.

 

Bob Upton, 172 West Glen Avenue, Green Ridgewood Chair, stated that at the January 8th Village Council meeting a group of young ladies addressed them with a request to fully fund the Shade Tree Commission with $100,000 for the replacement of trees that have been lost over previous years.  They very well described the importance of trees to the environment and the community.  At the last meeting of Green Ridgewood, they voted to support the Shade Tree Commission and speak in support of them and ask that the Village Council allocate those funds and that they are used for the trees.

 

Mr. Upton stated that in a personal matter, he notices that there was a discussion about accidents at the intersection of Monroe and West Glen Avenue which is just up the road from his house and a number of measures were introduced.  Sergeant Chuck mentioned that a number of those accidents that happened westbound on West Glen, heading up the hill, were rear end collisions Mr. Upton is not entirely confident that the changes that were suggested would do anything for rear end collisions.  He suspected that a lot of those are due to excessive speed.  A flasher was installed on North Walnut and he wondered if that may also be a solution for West Glen to bring to people’s attention the speed that they are traveling.

 

Ron Rosenzweig, was there on behalf of his client Woodfield Realty Property Owners on the corner of West Ridgewood Avenue off of Wilsey Square, of which he is also the President of.  He understands there is a question which was addressed several months ago and he has been waiting for some additional answers regarding the parking spaces there.  He was there on behalf of his tenants West Side Bagel, Davis Surgical, and Puzo’s Pizza, who are all very dependent on those parking spaces for people to come into their stores for five or ten minutes to pick up.  Many senior citizens use the spots at Davis Surgical to come in and pick up surgical supplies.  The removal of those spots would greatly impact all of those businesses, which would impact his business as a landlord. 

 

Mr. Rosenzweig stated that he believes there have been studies done by the Police and aside from two small periods of time that there really isn’t a traffic problem there.  It seems to him that if those parking spots are going to be taken away, it has a great impact for what is two twenty minute periods of congestion, at best.  Those parking spots are the lifeblood of those businesses as they all depend on those spaces. 

 

Neil Sullivan, 335 East Ridgewood Avenue, stated that he has become an avid player of Pickleball and he learned taking lessons through the Ridgewood Recreation Department, and he wanted to thank the town for putting in a first class Pickleball court at Glen School.  One thing he noticed is that there are so many senior citizens playing, which he thinks is great.  He understands that it may have been discussed before, and he is sympathetic about the noise.  He wished the Village Council could compromise as there is going to be noise, but if that can be reduced to an acceptable level he would make that as a suggestion.

 

Doug Rhoten, 120 Melrose Place, stated that he is an avid Pickleball player and he pulled the noise resolution verbiage today and when he thinks of noise he thinks of it in a very objective way, but the ordinance explains it in a very subjective way.  A growing number of towns are making their resolutions very objective with decibel meters and there is a lot of material about this online.  They make alarms that shine a light when people are being too loud, and you can also limit the number of people on the Pickleball court.  When he listens outside of gyms where they play, he can’t hear the Pickleball, but he can hear the yelling.  He added that if there was a notice posted that talked about the noise and limited the number of people he thinks they would be doing themselves a favor.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if Mr. Rhoten was willing to share his research.  He stated that he sent it to the Parks Department today, but he would be happy to send it to anyone else.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if he would send it to the Village Clerk.

 

Anne Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated she was there to talk about the update on Graydon Pool hours of operation.  There was nothing in the yellow binder about it so she can only go on what has been said in previous meetings and the information she got from the Parks Department.  It was stated that they were going to reduce the weeks of Graydon because it was difficult to get guards.  This is completely wrong to do this, as she just saw an advertisement for a Parking Enforcement Officer in the newspaper, and there are no lives at stake when they are giving out tickets.  The Graydon guards have to go through extremely rigorous training, and they start at $9.50 an hour.  She thought that was below the minimum wage, but found that is the State minimum for part time.  She stated that was a low wage to pay people who hold the lives of all of the people of the pool. 

 

Ms. Lowry stated that her grandchildren take lessons at the Y and the instructors are adults.  She imagined that if they were paying the guards up to $18 an hour they might be able to get adults who don’t have to go back to school.  She added that Graydon actually makes money, and we need to spend a little more money to get guards so that the hours won’t be cut, as you can’t put the rates up and then cut the season by weeks.

 

Carolyn Jacoby, 160 Godwin Avenue, stated that she was there to thank the Village Council for the consideration and support for our critically important tree inventory.  She hoped that it could begin in a month or so, and they could have information regarding what our tree canopy is, and have information to be able to sustain it, grow it, and increase it.  As a member of the Shade Tree Commission, she thanked Bob Upton and the Green Team for their support.  She added that trees are a tremendous noise abatement vehicle around the Pickleball courts.  

 

Ian Keller, 140 Cottage Place, stated that he wanted to second Ms. Jacoby’s comments as he is on the Shade Tree Commission and they have done quite a bit of work to take all the steps necessary to have the tree inventory completed.

 

Joe Ferrante, 610 Hillcrest Road, stated that he was here about three years ago, and in five days the Willard community put together over 400 signatures of families who were opposed to disrupting the status quo of the Glenwood Road.  Many of those same families authored letters to the New Jersey Department of Transportation, which characterized the bulk of those letters as “expressions of inconvenience.” He feels this is not an inconvenience, but rather a significant disruption of an historic pattern between neighborhoods, and it is a cavalier attitude that the NJDOT has exhibited in the report he read.  Mr. Ferrante stated that this hill is a mode of transportation between neighborhoods almost predated by the railroad.  He added that you have to maintain that two way pattern to maintain the relationship.

 

Mr. Ferrante stated that he was concerned several years ago when this started that it was a bad starting point to settle on one-way.  He added that the starting point should be what would it take to preserve this very vital link between neighborhoods, and he wondered if the Village Council was willing to ask that question.

 

Mary Meekham, 630 Morningside Road, stated that Glenwood Road is part of her normal routine, she uses it daily and has been concerned about the traffic that is now going down and up that hill is now going to be diverted to Glen or Wyckoff Avenue.  A lot of traffic comes from the Ridgewood residents in her area getting off the train at night and having people pick them up.  There are so many different issues here, and there are going to be lines of cars standing and waiting to pick people up from the train.  She added that there are a lot of other intersections that she would consider more dangerous.

 

There were no additional comments from the public, and Councilwoman Knudsen closed public comments.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they are certainly looking at all options with the NJDOT and she is confident that everyone has read the documents quite thoroughly.  She added that at the outset when they started down this road three years ago, the Village Council’s expectation was that they were working to keep it open both ways and weren’t looking to negotiate anything on it.  She requested the Village Manager and Village Engineer OPRA any documents from the NJDOT any documents that substantiated the report.  They are doing anything possible.  Councilman Voigt added that he was really concerned, as this suddenly came out of the blue and they didn’t hear about it until a few weeks ago.  He sees it as a major disruption for that area and has concerns about where the traffic is going to go, especially for West Glen.  He is hoping they can do anything and everything to stop this and that includes more enforcement, and working with Ho-Ho-Kus to make that road safer and then work with NJDOT to stop this.

 

Councilwoman Walsh echoed the comments, adding that the bad behavior of some causes an effect on others.  Unfortunately, bad drivers caused some pretty severe issues in this situation.  She is hoping they can come to some sort of a resolution.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that in terms of the 15 minute parking spaces, she was under the impression that was just housekeeping issues.  Regarding Pickleball, they are just working with the acoustics. 

 

  1. MANAGERS REPORT

 

Hudson Street Garage – Ms. Mailander stated that the crane is there at Hudson Street, and they are moving the precast panels into place.  This part of the process is approximately seven weeks, intermittent, weather permitting.  There will be closures during the day on Hudson Street, and South Broad Street will be closed intermittently during the day.  Both roads will be open to traffic during the evening. 

 

Parking Rate Increase – Ms. Mailander stated that a parking rate increase went into effect on February 1st, which is $1.25 per hour on the streets and $1.00 per hour in the lots.

 

Village Council Candidate Packets – Village Council candidate packets are available in the Village Clerk’s Office.  The completed forms are due back to the Village Clerk’s Office by March 9th at 4:00 P.M.  There are three Village Council seats up for election.

 

Poll Worker on Election Day – Ms. Mailander stated that there is an opportunity to be a poll worker in the Village in Election Day.  It is $200 for the day, from 5:30 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. on June 2nd or November 3rd.  You must be at least 18 years old, a Bergen County resident, registered to vote, and must attend a two hour training class.  If interested, contact the Bergen County Board of Elections.  You could most likely work in Ridgewood, and perhaps even in your own neighborhood.

 

Parking Kiosks – Ms. Mailander stated that parking kiosks are being installed throughout the CBD, and should be completed by the end of February.  At the kiosks, you enter a license plate and pay using coins or credit card.  There is a 3% convenience fee for using a credit card.  You do not have to display the receipt.  The 15 minute parking spaces at the end of each side street will remain in effect with meters.

 

Village Office Closure – Ms. Mailander stated that Village Offices will be closed on February 12th in observance of Lincoln’s Birthday and February 17th in observance of President’s Day.  There will be no garbage or recycling pickup on these days and the Recycling Center will also be closed.

 

Life Guards at Graydon Pool – In preparation for the summer, there is a need for certified Life Guards at Graydon Pool.  The American Red Cross is advertising a waterfront lifeguard training at a sand bottom facility in May or June at Graydon Pool.  For more information, contact Ridgewood Recreation at The Stable.

 

Single Use Plastic Bags – Ms. Mailander stated that single use plastic bags are banned in Ridgewood.  This includes supermarkets, restaurants, street fairs, and farmers markets.  Certain plastic bags are exempt, and she thanked residents for helping preserve our environment.  

 

Village Council Upcoming Meetings – February 19th is the Public Meeting, February 26th is the Village Council Work Session, and March 4th is a Village Council Work Session.

 

  1. COUNCIL REPORTS

 

Ridgewood Library – Councilwoman Walsh stated that there was a Reorganization Meeting and the new slate is President, Gail Campbell; Vice President, Vic Aurora; Treasurer, Dan Cumming; and Secretary, Janis Fuhrman.  There was a lengthy discussion about the application for the library grant that has been offered by the State.  They are endeavoring to get all of the materials together as quickly as possible, including updated architect’s drawings to be able to bring back to the Village Council.

 

Citizen Safety Advisory Committee – Councilman Voigt stated that CSAC had its meeting on the 16th.  West Glen and Monroe residents attended and expressed concern about that intersection.  There is one opening on the committee that needs to be filled and several residents have expressed interest.  Interest continues to remain on the Franklin Avenue corridor upgrade and Chris Rutishauser provided them with an update on that. Councilman Voigt stated that Starbucks continues to be an issue with the driveway entrance and exits and he is hoping they can get that resolved fairly soon.

 

Community Center Advisory Board – Councilman Voigt stated that they met on the 23rd of January and a number of events are coming up.  The Taub Foundation will fund Age Friendly Ridgewood for two more years based on the good work they are doing.  Upcoming presentations and events include March 2nd, Soups On at Healthbarn from 11:30 A.M. to 1:00 P.M., $10 for residents, $20 for non-residents; March 3rd at 6:30 P.M. the Library auditorium they have an elder attorney presenting on elder issues; March 5th at 10:00 A.M. at the Community Center “From Suffrage to the ERA”, $5 per resident; April 22nd at 6:30 P.M. in the Library auditorium Medicare 101 with Sheila Brogan; May 6th at 7:00 P.M. Mary Creegan will present on her book.  Upcoming student mixers at the Community Center, April 17th 7:30 P.M. to 9:00 P.M. sixth grade mixer, music, and pizza; May 1st 7th and 8th grade silent disco; and May 29th 6:30 P.M. to 7:30 P.M. and 8:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.  There is Step Up for the 5th graders to meet future classmates at BF and GW.

 

Planning Board – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Planning Board meeting last night was canceled, however, the Master Plan Subcommittee did meet and went over a draft of the Visioning and Master Plan documents and right now they are in the process of making sure all of the data points are correct and the information is accurate.  They anticipate that will go to the Planning Board for review and the Committee will be doing a presentation before the Village Council in early March.

 

Arts Council – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Arts Council will meet Tuesday evening at 7:30 P.M. in the caucus room.  They are working on a sculptor exhibit in the off season at Graydon, and a project on the Parking Garage.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the next item is to convene the Special Public Meeting. 

 

At 8:11 P.M., Councilwoman Walsh made a motion to suspend the Work Session and convene the Special Public Meeting.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, and Walsh

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        Mayor Hache

ABSTAIN:      None

 

At 8:17 P.M., the Regular Work Session was reconvened.

 

  1. PRESENTATION

             

  1. NJ Future

 

Tonya Warbeck, Community Planning Manager at New Jersey Future, stated that she wanted to speak about the work that Ridgewood is doing in terms of age friendly community building.  She stated that NJ Future is a non-profit, non-government organization.  They are mission driven and their main concern is the responsible sustainable use of land, so they work to promote smart sustainable land use policies and practices.  Research into age friendly started a few years ago with funding from the Henry and Marilyn Taub Foundation where the question was how people can stay in their communities and be engaged and afford to be in the kinds of communities that New Jersey has being of a sprawling development type pattern in many places.  She stated that Ridgewood is in a good position because it is a rather compact kind of community form.  Ms. Warbeck stated that a research project was done and two reports were produced.  One called “Creating Places to Age in New Jersey” and another one about housing affordability regarding some towns in Northern New Jersey. 

 

Ms. Warbeck stated that the reason they are looking at the aging population specifically is because we are in the middle of a demographic shift right now, and there is an increase in the demographic of age 50 and older and in the next ten years we will see an increase in the demographic for 65 and older.  This is a result of the baby boomers aging into that older age group.  About 30% of the population in most communities in the state is now age 55 and older.  The question is how to meet the needs of this population.  Most surveys indicate that people would like to stay in their communities, preferably in their current home, or to have options to downsize in their community, and also to have opportunities to work or engage in their community. 

 

NJ Future has set out to evaluate communities in terms of meeting the needs in relation to land use patterns. Ms. Warbeck stated that they have developed a methodology to assess communities based on housing, transportation, mixed use center, and public spaces and amenities that are available.  The form of a community can determine whether it is harder or easier for a person to be able to stay in a community as they age and be able to stay engaged in a community as they age. 

 

Ms. Warbeck stated that types of the things that can be a barrier are housing, which is an issue for many people in the State in terms of mobility issues  and affordability, especially as our aging population moves into fixed incomes.  Auto dependency is an issue, as people tend to drive less as they age.  Having public spaces and gathering spaces for recreation, exercise, and community engagement is important.  These are the kinds of barriers that exist for people in communities.  New Jersey is a home rule state, so it is the municipal decision makers that set the vision for the community and the form it will take.  Ms. Warbeck stated that happens through master planning, visioning, zoning boards, planning, regulations, and capital budget, which are the things that a town can address or look at to help the aging population.

 

Ms. Warbeck stated that the NJ Future Aging Friendly Program has two components, one is doing land use assessments at the local level with municipalities, and the other is implementation planning.  Ridgewood has had an assessment done and now they are in the implementation planning phase with Ridgewood.  The assessment process is an engagement process.  They inform and engage the community through information sessions, and then through a project committee they prepare demographic profiles.  Then they engage the stakeholders both from the municipality as well as community stakeholders.  Ms. Warbeck stated that they get feedback through that engagement process to then go on and perform that aging friendly assessment which indicates recommendations.

 

Ms. Warbeck stated that with mixed use centers, they are looking for whether a town has a mixed use center, which is a downtown environment with retail and residential that would allow people to live closer to destinations and improves vibrancy of the downtown.  Their recommendations would be town specific for ways that the town could create that downtown environment with walkability being a priority, pedestrian oriented and a mix of uses.  Ms. Warbeck stated that with housing over 40% of New Jersey’s households are housing cost burdened meaning that they are spending more than 30% of their income on housing.  For older residents that is more than 50%.  Ridgewood is a little less than the State, but about 45% with the 65 and older population.  They are looking for options that are affordable, such as apartments and smaller units.

 

Ms. Warbeck stated that with transportation, they are looking to see if everyone needs a car to get around town.  They are looking for connectivity and whether other modes of transportation exist.  They also look at safety in terms of the number of lanes of traffic, speed of the road, and Complete Streets recommendations, as well.  Regarding public spaces and amenities, they are looking for an interconnected network so that people have a way to get out in the community easily.  The recommendations they make would be to enhance the existing facilities or fill the gaps for that network.

 

Ms. Warbeck stated that they created an assessment for the Village that was shared with the Village Council.  The next phase is the implementation planning.  It is important because it sets the blueprint for the steps that need to get done to meet the goals.  They identify specific things that could be done to achieve a specific goal.  It lays out who is responsible, the timeline, funding sources, and estimated costs.  This helps build support for the initiative and the projects, as well.  They are looking to have a well thought out plan for action to move forward.  With Ridgewood, they are doing public engagement tonight and will continue to do that, and then begin to identify the very specific action steps.  Then they want to continue to get that feedback from the municipality.

 

Ms. Warbeck stated that another part of this process is to lead this into the everyday municipal decision making, to think about these other aspects with this consideration of aging friendliness.  With implementation planning, they want to act on the strategies, engage the community, integrate these concepts, and promote the work.  They have the recommended strategies from the assessment, which are fairly general, and they want to bring those down to an actionable item.  They want to come up with smart objectives and then assess or prioritize that based on how much impact it will have and also how feasible it is.  They held a workshop and the project committee from Ridgewood, Teaneck, and Westwood were there.  Each of the recommendations from the assessment were written out and they got to come up with the top five priorities.

 

Ms. Warbeck stated that based on the discussion at this workshop, she developed a priorities matrix ranking the recommendations.  The project committee will present the resulting priority chart to the Village Council next month, and it is from that they will work to develop the implementation plan that has the action steps to get them closer to implementation for the high priority items on the list.  In terms of their timeline, they have formed the project committee, had the workshop, developed actions, and had a couple of follow-up meetings to finalize that implementation matrix.  She added that they are engaging the Village Council and she will be talking to the Planning Board.  She will work with the project committee to draft the implementation plan.  There are no obligations to implement, but these are things that have been determined as important for the aging population in the town.

 

Councilman Voigt stated that of the four top priorities, three have to do with walking and outdoors which says a lot about the Village in that people want to be outdoors and to exercise.  Ms. Warbeck stated that it is great the enthusiasm that the project team is showing.  Councilman Voigt added that with the new developments that are going to be opening, there are going to be a lot of people downtown and they are going to need to address the walkability.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that in addition to the walkability, she works with a lot of contractors who retired and then came back after realizing that they were too idle, so that is another thing that keeps coming up. 

 

Councilman Sedon stated that he was interested to know if they talked about taxes and if there were any creative solutions to lowering taxes as that seems to directly impact affordability.  Ms. Warbeck stated that is a great question as that is the crux of the problem, but she is in the process of compiling examples of innovative things that towns have done, including public-private partnerships.  As far as taxes, other than the State assistance, it is tricky.  They are compiling those kinds of resources and she will be sharing that when complete.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she had the same observations and they are facing some potential referendums in Ridgewood, and these are things that really need to be looked at and considered.  She added that people are living longer and are more capable, so they do look for employment opportunities in their community which gives an opportunity to socialize.

 

  1. DISCUSSION

             

  1. Ridgewood Water

 

  1. Award Sole Source Contract – Exchange of GAC Vessels at Carr Well

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Carr Treatment Plant came on-line after the installation of granular activated carbon treatment for the removal of PFAS compounds.  This filter media consists of carbon based product that is manufactured by Calgon Carbon Corporation of Pennsylvania.  That filter media will require replacement annually.  Therefore, Mr. Calbi’s recommendation is to award a sole source contract to Calgon Carbon in an amount not to exceed $128,000 for the year 2020.  Funding for the purchase is budgeted in the 2020 operating account. 

 

  1. Award Three Year Contract – Customer Billing Portal, Communications and Consumption Analytics Software

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they went out to bid for this.  One bid was picked up and one was received.  The sole bidder was Rio Supply of Sicklerville, New Jersey, who is a reseller of WaterSmart.  The recommendation is to award a three year contract to Rio Supply in the amount of $66,450 for year one, $43,800 for year two, and $45,060 for year three.  Funding is in the Water Utility Operating Budget of each year.  The first year is so high because there is a one-time setup fee of $23,700.

 

  1. Award Contract – National Co-Op Purchasing Agreement – Materials and Supplies

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was a resolution for the purchase of materials and supplies under the National Joint Powers Alliance Cooperative Purchasing Contract and for facilities, maintenance, repair and operating related supplies for safety related equipment and supplies, accessories, and services.  Ridgewood Water anticipates exceeding the statutory limit of $17,500 for these materials and therefore is in need of a Village Council resolution to purchase these items for 2020.  The award is to Granger, of Plainfield in an amount not to exceed $85,000.  This is in the water operating budget.

 

  1. Award Sole Source Contract – Furnish Corrosion Inhibitor

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Lead and Copper rule from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection mandates that Ridgewood Water maintain a Corrosion Control Program.  Corrosion control is the treatment process in which small amounts of phosphate inhibitors are added to the water in order to prevent corrosion.  They create a thin coating inside the plumbing materials and therefore prevents the erosion of lead and copper into the water.  In 2013, Ridgewood Water implemented a pilot program, utilizing poly-orthophosphate to control corrosion in the system.  Based on its success, Ridgewood Water installed the inhibitor ESC 532 at all of the active treatment facilities.  The installation was completed in April of 2016 and it is used at all points of entry for Ridgewood Water.

 

ESC Environmental uses a unique blend of polyphosphates and orthophosphate that is developed and distributed solely through their company.  Therefore, the recommendation is a sole source contract to ESC Environmental of Glenville, NY in the amount of $175,000 for the year 2020.  The funding is in the water operating account. 

 

  1. Parking

 

  1. Discuss Saturday Parking of Permit Holders in All Lots

 

Ms. Mailander stated that is has always been the policy that residents who purchase the Ridgewood Parking Permits can use them not only for commuting, but can also use the RPP at any time on the parking lots, whether it is in the evening or on a Saturday.  It has also been the policy that if they are parking with the RPP in the lots, that they can stay for as long as they wish, and not just for three hours.  The ordinance is not clear on these policies. The recommendation is to amend the ordinance to indicate that the RP may be used at any time, to park in the lots, without a time limit.  In addition, the amendment to the ordinance will indicate that the resident parking with the RPP in the lots cannot park in the shopper/diners or the CBD Employee parking spaces, except after 6:00 P.M. in the North Walnut lot.  This has been the policy since the RPPs were established.

 

Councilman Voigt asked if this is for the people who buy the permit for the Train Station. Ms. Mailander stated that it applies to everyone that has a permit.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if someone has the Chestnut Lot sticker can they park in the Train Station lot.  Ms. Mailander stated that on Saturdays and in the evenings they haven’t limited it, but they could.  Councilman Sedon stated that he wouldn’t limit it, as he can see the Train Station being a premium on a weekday, but on a Saturday a lot of people don’t commute.  Councilwoman Walsh agreed with Councilman Sedon. 

 

  1. West Ridgewood Avenue – 15-Minute Parking Spaces

 

Ms. Mailander stated that there are four parking spaces in front of the Wine Seller.  All four spaces have been memorialized in the Village Code, so they are all legal spaces.  There was a request from a resident who felt that there was a backup there.  It usually happens in the morning for around 20 minutes and around 3:30 P.M. for about 20 minutes according to the study done by the Police Department.  They went to the local businesses who said that they would be very concerned if these spaces were removed due to the fact that people use them to go into the stores quickly. 

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she was having a problem seeing where the four spaces were.  Ms. Mailander stated they were between Washington Place and Wilsey Square.  Councilman Sedon stated that he would be in favor of keeping it as it is.  Councilman Voigt stated that he was okay keeping the spaces.  Councilwoman Knudsen and Councilwoman Walsh discussed the exact location of the spaces.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that there needed to be a better explanation of the location of the spaces.  Ms. Mailander stated that could be amended to make it more clear.

 

  1. Budget

 

  1. Award State Contract – Portable Radios – Police Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is a resolution for the purchase of ten portable radios under State Contract and the vendor is Motorola Solutions, Inc. of Paramus.  It is an amount not to exceed $31,660.50 and is being paid for through the Police Department’s capital budget.  These new radios will better interface with the radio system, and have better fidelity of transmissions in higher noise environments.  It is part of a multi-year replacement program and after this purchase, a little over half of the officers will have upgraded portable radios.

 

Councilwoman Walsh asked if when mechanicals like this are purchased, there is a warranty, but is there a life expectancy.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would find out.

 

  1. Award Professional Services Contract – 2020 Tax Assessment Map

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is an annual contract for professional land surveying services for the certification, survey work supervision, and assistance with preparation of the Village of Ridgewood Tax Assessment Map for 2020.  The vendor is Daniel Dunn of Waldwick, and the amount is not to exceed $1,700, which has remained the same amount for the last ten years.  The retainer provides the Village with a New Jersey Professional Land Surveyor to endorse our tax maps and provide the license coverage for the survey work the staff of the Engineering Division prepares for various construction projects and regulatory submittals.  It will be paid out of the operating budget.

 

  1. Award Contract – Coach Bus Transportation Services – 2020 Senior Day Trips

 

Ms. Mailander stated that there was a bid in January accepted for Coach Bus Transportation Services for Senior Day Trips.  Five packets were emailed to vendors for their consideration and two were received.  Of the two bids, one of the bids was received late, and mailed back unopened.  It ended up being one sole bid from Panorama Tours, Inc. of Wallington.  It is an amount not to exceed $11,080 for the 2020 trips.  They have worked with Panorama Tours in the past, and were consistently on time with professional and courteous drivers.

 

  1. Award Contract – Diesel Exhaust Removal System – Fleet Garages

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Fleet Services Division received three informal written quotes for that project.  They are recommending the award of the work to Clean Air Company, Inc. of Fords, New Jersey, in the amount of $20,586.03 as the lowest responsible quote.  It will be paid for through the capital budget.

 

  1. Award Contract – New Jersey Co-Op Purchasing Program – GIS Mapping – Parks Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is the Shade Tree Inventory, and Ridgewood Parks and Recreation and the Shade Tree Commission have partnered together.  This will help us better understand the composition, structure, and maintenance needs of what we have, allocate resources, and qualify for financial grant assistance developed with management strategies.  Using a GIS mapping unit in the field collection to identify various characteristics of each street tree.  The anticipated visual assessment of approximately 12,000 shade trees will be conducted through state contract holder, Civil Solutions of Hammonton, and their partner Davey Resource Group.  It is an amount not to exceed $56,215.  A recent grant that the Village received in the amount of $10,000 will be put towards this as well as $50,000 funding which has been verified in the capital budget account.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it was important to point out that these are Village owned street trees.  Councilman Sedon added that we don’t even know exactly how many street trees we have; it is just anecdotal evidence from people who have worked in the Village and drove around.

 

  1. Declare Property Surplus – 2011 Ford Crown Victoria – Police Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this vehicle is in constant need of repair and the cost of repair exceeds the value of the vehicle.  The Fleet Department has inspected it and agrees that it cannot be repaired or rehabilitated.  It went from the Police Department to the Building Department and now it is in a condition where it really can’t be used by any of the other Departments.  It will be declared surplus and turned over to Enterprise LLC and sold at public auction according to State law.  Proceeds from the sale will be credited to the Ridgewood Police Department account with Enterprise.  Councilwoman Walsh asked if this was the last Crown Victoria.  Ms. Mailander stated that they may have another one.

 

  1. Award Contract – Installation, Service and Repair of Police Vehicle Equipment and Radios

 

Ms. Mailander stated this is Police, Fire, and Emergency Services and is for the maintenance of emergency radios, equipment, vehicle computer systems for those three Divisions.  This is the second optional year of a contract and it will be awarded to the original sole bidder, Regional Communications of Paramus, not to exceed $30,000.

 

  1. 2019 Appropriation Reserve Transfer Resolution

 

Ms. Mailander stated this is an annual resolution which transfers money from those Departments which have extra money to those that do not have enough money to pay the 2019 bills.

 

  1. Capital Ordinance – Paving of South Broad Street

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this will be a bond ordinance for a total of $216,000.  The Village received a $210,000 grant from the New Jersey Department of Transportation for this, but we have to appropriate the full amount and then get reimbursed. We will take $6,000 from the general capital fund balance account.

 

  1. Capital Ordinance – Paving of Spring Avenue

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is a total of $180,000 and the Village received an NJDOT grant in the amount of $175,000.  We will take $5,000 from the general capital fund balance account.

 

  1. Deferred School Tax

 

Ms. Mailander stated this is an annual resolution and it allows for the maximum deferral which is the most favorable position to take since it increases the Village’s fund balance account and will help offset any restrictions from reserve accounts which may arise from 2018 financial operations.

 

  1. Resolutions to Amend Capital Budget

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for the two paving projects, South Broad Street and Spring Avenue.  They have to amend the temporary capital budget because we haven’t adopted our final capital budgets yet.

 

  1. Award Contract – State Co-Op Purchasing Program – 2019 Ford F250 – Water Pollution Control

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Water Pollution Control Division has residual capital funds budgeted for vehicles.  The pickup to be replaced is a 2009 Ford F-250 identified as truck WP-53, which has significant underbody corrosion due to the environment at the plant.  The purchase is through the New Jersey State Cooperative Purchasing Program through the Route 23 Automall of Butler, in an amount not to exceed $36,846.

 

  1. Award Contract – Drainage System at 220 Chestnut Street – Fleet Garages

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Streets/Fleet Services Division solicited and received three informal written quotes to make corrections to our drainage system at 220 Chestnut Street.  They recommend the award of work to ConQuest Construction, Inc. of Westwood in the amount of $26,430.

 

  1. Award Contract – Printing for Municipal Election

 

Ms. Mailander stated that because this is a Municipal Election, the Village pays for all printing, which includes the election materials, ballots, and labels for the sample ballots.  They deliver to the Post Office, and print the sample mail-in ballots in English, Spanish, and Korean.  Election expenses are exempt from the public bidding law.  The Village used Royal Printing Service for the 2016 and 2018 Municipal Elections and the referendum election held in 2016.  Ms. Mailander stated that they have been very pleased with their work and they have also been used by Bergen County for the printing of the Primary and General elections for several years.  The quote is $19,800 for the printing, which is the same amount they charged in 2018.  She recommended the award to Royal Printing Service of West New York, NJ.

 

  1. Declare Surplus – Various Equipment – Parks and Recreation

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was for various equipment to be declared surplus, and is being sold through municibid.com which is approved under the State purchasing system.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they knew how old all of this equipment is.  Ms. Mailander stated they could find out.

 

  1. Update on Status of Bathrooms at Graydon Pool

 

Ms. Mailander stated that Connolly and Hickey worked on the overall scheme for the Graydon Pool bathrooms which are getting upgraded, painted, and will have new fixtures.  The partitions between each of the changing areas and bathroom stalls started to disintegrate when the contractor removed them as part of their work.  Connolly and Hickey had thought they would be fine to put back in, but they have realized they can’t do that.  It is $30,000 for the new partitions so that everything is going to look upgraded.  They have to do a change order for $30,000 and the contractor said they could try to use the old ones but they may not stay up.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that her opinion is they are doing the work and in the long run it might cost us more, so while they are doing the work right now let’s get it done correctly.  Ms. Mailander added that it should last decades after this, and there is a May 1st deadline.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they could get an update on the historic designation of Graydon Pool.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would get that update.

             

  1. Policy

 

  1. Revisit Winter Door Enclosure Ordinance – Extend Time Period

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Village Council proposed an ordinance to permit winter door enclosures in the CBD with dates of January 1st to February 28th or 29th.  The Planning Board had recommended December 1st because it is the restaurant industries’ busy holiday season, and it is cold enough to warrant the use during that time.  In speaking with the restaurant owners, the enclosures are expensive and the additional month would allow them to get more use from them.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she gets what they are saying and they are expensive, but she asked what the dates are on the outdoor café.  Ms. Mailander stated that right now it is March 1st to November 30th.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she still thinks it’s good to have a little time where they see the sidewalk and that was the basis for even amending the outdoor café ordinance.  She added that they find that the sidewalks really do need to be inspected and have some attention.  Ms. Mailander suggested December 10th. Councilwoman Walsh stated that the way she looks at it, the whole reason that they are doing this is to keep inclement weather out when doing a transition and opening the door.  If the intent is to have this up in the coldest part of the year, it would make sense to have December, January, February.  Councilman Sedon suggested December 10th to give some time to look at the sidewalk.

 

Mr. Rogers suggested that as part of the process for doing the permitting either for the outdoor cafes or for the winter door enclosures they could make sure that since the responsibility and the liability for the sidewalks in the commercial area are with the property owner, you could make sure that they get inspected when they apply for the permit and to make it part of the administrative process.  The Village Council agreed with that recommendation.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they would make it December 1st and then add that there will be an inspection and repair as part of the application process.  Councilwoman Walsh agreed.  Ms. Mailander stated that it probably should be done when they get their outdoor café permit, as they can do the repairs then.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the inspection should then be part of every outdoor café permit.  Ms. Mailander agreed.

 

  1. Occupancy Ordinance

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that she included in everyone’s packet information about occupancy ordinances in other municipalities.  The fire code for residences was included, as well as an article that showed what happens when planning isn’t done before.  We have a downtown that is going to be full, so she wanted to get a jump on this before that point.  Most towns do an occupancy ordinance to ensure that developments adhere to existing guidelines.  It talks about square footage of units and the HUD guidelines.  She met with Mr. Rutishauser and they spoke about the sewage lines that go down Franklin Avenue and he assured her that they have capacity to handle all of the proposed units that are under construction at this time.  In terms of fire safety and what was proposed, they follow these guidelines and there wouldn’t be anything out of the ordinary proposed in their ordinance.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it was a complicated process when they expanded the sewer line, and there had been some discussion about the occupancy ordinance and she thinks they should definitely have one.  Councilman Voigt stated that he agreed and there was agreement among the rest of the Village Council.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that this would have to go to the Planner and then discuss the process involved.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that out of all of them, she liked the way Allendale did it because they set it up in a way that was very understandable.  When the applications came to the Planning Board, they proposed the different unit sizes based on these other Uniformed Construction Codes and the HUD.  Councilwoman Knudsen agreed. 

 

Mr. Rogers stated that they should contact the Planner and have them look at it and how it fits into our scheme of things.  Ms. Mailander asked if it would go to the Planning Board.  Mr. Rogers stated that it wasn’t necessarily land use, but was more construction.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would give the Planner the packet and then look at something similar to Allendale’s.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that Ramsey wasn’t much different, but the grid that Allendale provided was easy to understand.

 

  1. Accept Donation to Community Center – North Jersey Masters

 

Ms. Mailander stated that each year volunteers that are made up of Parks and Recreation staff and family members host a water table on Fairfield Avenue for the runners of the 10k during the run.  As a thank you, North Jersey Masters donates some of the proceeds to the Community Center to help fund programs, as needed.  They are donating $1,000 and North Jersey Masters does not have any applications before any Ridgewood Board or Committee at this time.

 

  1. Update on Pickleball Courts – Acoustiblok

 

Ms. Mailander stated that she sent the Village Council additional information on the Acoustiblok fence that is being proposed for the Pickleball courts at Glen School regarding sound studies that were done with and without acoustic fences and showing the reduction in the noise levels achieved.  Noise was reduced ten to twelve decibels in a sound meter test conducted by the US Pickleball Association and this is more than a 50% reduction in sound.  Councilman Voigt had asked about a trial period to rent them, but they don’t do that.  However, if we are not happy with their product, they will refund the Village’s money less the cost of shipping the product back to them which is approximately $1,100.  They are convinced that this is going to be something that is going to benefit along with the muted balls, so they are hoping to award the contract and get this installed before the courts open.

 

Councilman Voigt asked what the warranty is on this.  Ms. Bigos stated that she would have to get back to them on that.  Ms. Mailander shared samples with the Village Council.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they could use the black color.  Councilwoman Walsh was worried about impacting the view into the courts in terms of safety.  Ms. Bigos stated that was already happening because there are windscreens on all courts right now, which are only two feet shorter than the panels coming in.  She added that it is opaque, but you would be able to see people’s legs at the bottom.  It has been designed to have the parking lot visible so that you will see the courts from the parking lot and the wall would be on the three sides adjacent to the homeowners’ properties.

 

Councilman Sedon asked if there was room to plant additional trees there.  Ms. Bigos stated that was something that she and Ms. Mailander discussed earlier today when they reviewed the Department budget.  Additional shrubs by municipal courts is something that she and the new Parks Supervisor are looking into. Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it appears from the photos that there is a tremendous amount of obstruction that already exists from the shrubbery that is there.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that was another location.

 

  1. Update on Graydon Pool Hours of Operation

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they have sent out to area high schools as well as to area colleges the help wanted advertisement for lifeguards.  The hourly rate varies depending on if they have worked here previously.  The rate of $10.43 is the low end and we are proposing $11 for the low end, and the salary goes up for those who have been here longer.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that to Ms. Loving’s point, if they were to increase the amount slightly, would they attract older applicants and is that something they should look at.  Ms. Mailander stated that increasing the pay, increases the budget, and ultimately taxes.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that she doesn’t believe in age discrimination.

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that if they were going to limit the season by a week they would have to discount the amount.  Ms. Mailander stated that this was a proposal and the reason is safety due to the lack of lifeguards.  They are hoping increasing the pay will gather lifeguards, and are doing an aggressive campaign to get more lifeguards.  There has also been contact with one of the swim teams at a local high school.  The minimum age is 16.  She added that there is training, and they have to be able to get up into the lifeguard chair.

 

Ms. Bigos stated that there is a prerequisite in order for them to start the lifeguarding course.  They have to be able to swim a mile and then other physical endurance tests.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that there are older adults that can meet those expectations, to which Ms. Mailander agreed.  Councilman Sedon asked if there was a thought to go out to a temporary employment agency.  Ms. Bigos stated that she wasn’t sure about that but they have gone out to Montclair, William Paterson, Ramapo, Bergen Community, Ridgewood High School, Franklin Lakes, Midland Park, Northern Highlands, Paramus, Waldwick, Ramsey, Mahwah, Glen Rock, Elmwood Park, the New Jersey Pool Manager’s Association, and various other contacts.  She added that they always start accepting applications for returning staff on March 1st and are ready to accept them.  Training is set and she has been in contact with the YMCA that does a waterfront program, but Graydon is black water and they offer to lifeguards the opportunity to take a bridge course to be certified in our facility with our staff and rescue procedures.

 

Councilman Sedon stated that that sounds like they went out extensively, and he agreed with Councilwoman Walsh that if they do have to limit the season there should be some type of reimbursement.  Ms. Bigos stated that they have been creative in the past, where there have been times where they have closed the section along Maple Avenue and maybe have people in the kiddie area, or sunbathe at the deep end without going in the water.  At the end of the season she sits with her management staff and they critique the summer.  One of the concerns that comes up every year is the three preseason weeks where college staff are in but work a double shift.  The Department of Health licenses Graydon and performs inspections, so they abide by those rules and regulations.  Councilwoman Knudsen encouraged using social media.

 

  1. Vehicle Anti-Idling Policy

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Village Council adopted a resolution in 2009 to put into place a policy that prohibits vehicles from idling, which is part of Sustainable Jersey.  It requires renewal every ten years.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that there are signs in certain places in town where she was told there are cars idling and she noticed in those areas there were no signs.  She asked if residents could recommend if they see people idling.  Ms. Mailander stated she would like to know the locations.  Councilman Sedon stated that he heard the same thing.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked how that impacts people who have the remote start.  Ms. Mailander stated that it is a resolution because it is a policy.

 

  1. Amendment to Single-Use Plastic Bag Ordinance

 

Ms. Mailander stated that although the ordinance is very comprehensive, so far they have found a couple of issues that have arisen.  The current ordinance does not specify if the plastic bags that can be used 125 times must have that printed on the bag itself.  The recommendation is that as long as they can get a distributor’s letter that it can be used 125 times, that would be okay, and that it wouldn’t have to be printed on the bag itself.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she was so proud of our Village because she sees everybody with their bags going into different shops throughout town, and it definitely is something that many are embracing.

 

Ms. Mailander added that there is no section of the ordinance that states the enforcement officers regulations and the recommendation is that it be modeled somewhat after Paramus who says that the Health Officer has the authority to enforce the ordinance.  She added that they also recommend that the Health Department be able to check the bags during twice a year.  Restaurant inspections and stores that are not food establishments would not be inspected, per se, however if there were a complaint filed they would do it on a complaint.  The thought is there would be some kind of flyer handed out to all of the establishments so they would be aware of it.  Ms. Mailander added they need to define the fine, and leave it up to the Judge, or specify an amount.

 

Councilman Sedon asked if there have been many cases in front of the Judge.  Ms. Mailander stated that there haven’t been any cases yet, and there was just one situation where they weren’t sure if the bag was complaint, but then they did accept a distributor’s letter.  Mr. Rogers stated that he thinks from a fine standpoint, it is usually best to give direction to the court and also state as a matter of law the type of exposure.  He recommended taking a look at other towns in terms of what their findings are and what their schedules may be on fines, and see if they find those appropriate for what they want to project here in Ridgewood.  The other side is that once they do that, they can also take a look and say a fine is no less than a certain amount for this offence and still leave it to the discretion of the court as far as where to go with that.  Councilman Sedon agreed with that.  Ms. Mailander stated that they would probably bring it back at the end of February or beginning of March.  

 

  1. Multi-Family Housing Informational Banners

 

Ms. Mailander stated that Mr. Rutishauser was approached about the possibility of temporarily waiving the sign limitation, as each of the construction sites would like to be able to provide people driving by with information about the project and who to contact for more information.  In addition, Mayor Hache had said that he was interested in having banners put up by the development so that people knew what was going to be built there.  Mr. Rutishauser indicated that perhaps they should suspend the enforcement of sign regulations for the banners and they would still have to pay a fee for the real estate sign.  Councilman Sedon stated that it seems that the banner would just be a real estate sign.  Ms. Mailander stated that they have received a lot of calls about who people should contact if they are interested in renting, and the Village really doesn’t have that information, at all. This would help if someone were passing by.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that this would add to confusion as people would have to slow down to read it.  Councilman Voigt stated that he was concerned with how long the signs would stay up.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that it said 210 days.

 

Mr. Rogers stated that he would be concerned about allowing banners for certain apartments or units that are being developed and not others that are not the same type of development.  Providing advertising for these developments is a stretch sometimes in terms of municipal assistance.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that in Morristown they have a simple sign, and when you go to that company’s website it takes you to the realtor’s site, and then it is their responsibility to provide the information on the website.  She added that she didn’t know if the Village rules were specific for a real estate sign in terms of what it could say.  Ms. Mailander stated that she knows it is for 30 days and then they could renew it for additional periods of 30 days.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she would imagine the developers would put up a small sign that has a website and social media details.  Ms. Mailander asked if they would allow a sign on each one.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that whatever out current code is, applies to those sites, as well. 

 

  1. Operations

 

  1. Appoint Clean Communities Coordinator and Recycling Coordinator

 

Ms. Mailander stated that these will be Sean Hamlin, retroactive to November 1, 2019.

 

  1. Approve Joining Somerset County Co-Op Pricing System

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this offers pricing for heavy truck repairs for work outside the scope of our Fleet Division mechanics, and has several vendors they customarily do business with.  Mr. Rutishauser has recommended that the Village join this cooperative because it will be the fastest way to obtain truck repair services that Fleet Services needs and have been competitively bid in the past.  The Village needs a resolution to join and also allow the execution of the agreement by the Mayor and Village Manager.

 

  1. Update on NJDOT Decision – Warren Avenue/Glenwood Road

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the report goes through what happened, which is that they proposed recommendations, had comments from Ridgewood residents, the Ho-Ho-Kus Chamber of Commerce, and the Village Council adopted a resolution.  Therefore, it was sent to the Exception Review Committee at NJ Transit comprised of various high level people, and they evaluated and decided to create an enforcement/non-enforcement trial period.  They then received an evaluated follow-up report from the enforcement/non-enforcement trial period in April 2019 in which they rendered a decision to establish Warren Avenue as one way.  Therefore, the Commissioner of the DOT based upon that Memorandum of Record says that they adopt the recommendations of that team.  According to the Administrator in Ho-Ho-Kus, they have never wavered from closing or one-way.  They started out saying they were going to close it completely and then because of the comments they decided that one-way would be a compromise.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Administrator believes they are planning to put shovels in the ground early summer.  There are going to be times when it is closed anyway because they are going to be doing improvements to the track area, as well as the Village having to eventually create Glenwood Road as a one-way in the eastbound direction.  It is about 2.5 to 3 years of construction to the track bed, drainage, and there are quite a few other things they are going to have to do.  She added that Village residents are still very concerned, and she understands.

 

Councilman Voigt asked how they could have better communication with Ho-Ho-Kus as it seems to be they are the ones talking with NJDOT.  Ms. Mailander stated that they have been good in telling us, and got the Village invited to the meeting when it was initially discussed.  NJDOT, in her mind, mistakenly thinks this is a Ho-Ho-Kus issue only.  Councilman Voigt stated that he was having a hard time understanding how the Ho-Ho-Kus person was rendering opinions and decisions on the people that live up in the Willard School District.  Ms. Mailander stated that he wasn’t rendering decisions. Councilman Voigt stated that he was making recommendations on changes that are going to effect a lot of people.  Ms. Mailander stated that he wasn’t making a decision, it is NJDOT and NJ Transit.  Councilman Voigt asked how do they get the Village inserted into the discussions.  He finds it incomprehensible that these huge tractor trailers go up this hill.  A few months ago he stopped a huge bus trying to go up the hill.  There is an issue with GPS that needs to be fixed and could help immensely.  He added that the enforcement by the Village and Ho-Ho-Kus could help immensely, and they need to figure a way to fix this with NJDOT. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that her concern is that it says “further directs” so she asked if the Village continued the conversation, would they consider punitive damages to close the road and put the Village in a bind.  Ms. Mailander stated that they still have that option.  Councilman Voigt stated that he talked with a representative who said that they didn’t know the ramifications that it would have on the surrounding streets.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she knows that at one point they talked about putting up a height restriction gate.  Maybe they could compile a list of additional measures that they could implement to help them understand that the Village recognizes their concerns, but that by taking this type of an action they may be fixing a perceived safety hazard but may actually be creating other safety hazards.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would talk to Mr. Rutishauser about that.

 

Councilwoman Walsh asked if there was a way they could count the cars that come back and forth every day this week as that would be helpful.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they dispatched the portable signage.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that goes back to bad behavior as people do that all over the Village.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that we need to see more of their reports and observations.  Councilman Voigt added that he thinks they need to get themselves more involved in this process.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she was stunned when she saw this, as if they implemented certain safeguards and they never heard from the NJDOT.  The point was to keep it open both ways, and this came out of left field for her.  Ms. Mailander stated that she contacted the Administrator in Ho-Ho-Kus and he stated that this was the only report that he received in May.  Councilwoman Knudsen agreed with Councilwoman Walsh’s point to do the counter and put up signage.  Councilman Voigt added they should also count the trucks that go up and down the hill, as that is a major problem that needs to be resolved.

 

  1. REVIEW OF FEBRUARY 19, 2020 PUBLIC MEETING AGENDA

 

The following is a review of the February 19, 2020 Public Meeting Agenda.

 

Proclamations include: Dad’s Night Days – Hawes School and Somerville School; Read Across America Day; and Super Science Saturday.

 

Resolutions: Authorize Temporary Capital Budget – Maple Park Field Lighting; and Authorize Temporary Capital Budget – Paving.

 

Resolutions for Ridgewood Water: Award Sole Source Contract – Corrosion Inhibitor; Award Sole Source Contract – Exchange of GAC Vessels at Carr Well; Title 59 Approval – Customer Billing Portal, Communications and Consumption Analytics Software; Award Contract – Customer Billing Portal, Communications and Consumption Analytics Software; and Award Contract Under National Cooperative Purchasing Contract – Materials and Supplies.

 

Ordinances for Introduction: 3781 – Bond Ordinance – Maple Park Field Lighting; 3782 – Bond Ordinance – Paving of South Broad Street; and 3783 – Bond Ordinance – Paving of Spring Avenue.

 

Ordinances for Public Hearing include: 3775 – Bond Ordinance – Street Paving and Streetscape, Security for Village-Owned Facilities and Buildings; 3776 – Parking Utility Bond Ordinance – Environmental Cleanup for Hudson Street Parking Lot; 3777 – Amend Chapter 212 – Parks and Recreation Areas – Rules and Regulations for Tennis Courts – Pickleball; 3778 – Amend Chapter 190 – Land Use and Development – Requirements for Lettering on Signs; 3779 – Amend Chapter 165 – Garbage, Refuse and Recycling – Bulk Refuse Definitions; 3780 – Amend Chapter 165 – Garbage, Refuse and Recycling – Container Specifications & Setout Requirements.

 

Resolutions include: Approve 2019 Budget Reserve Transfers; Award Contract – Diesel Exhaust Removal System – Fleet Services Garages; Award Contract – Printing for Municipal Election; Award Contract – Sound Panels for Glen Pickleball Courts; Title 59 Approval – Coach Bus Transportation Services – 2020 Senior Day Trips; Award Contract – Coach Bus Transportation Services; Title 59 Approval – Installation, Service and Repair of Police, Fire and EMS Equipment and Radios; Award Contract Under State Contract – Portable Radios; Award Contract Under State Contract – GIS Mapping Services for Tree Inventory; Award Contract Under State Contract – 2019 Ford F250 – Water Pollution Control Facility; Award Contract – Drainage System at 220 Chestnut Street – Fleet Services Garage; Award Professional Services Contract – 2020 Land Surveying Services Retainer for Preparation of Tax Assessment Map; Authorize Membership in Somerset County Cooperative Pricing System; Deferred School Tax; Accept Donation for Community Center for North Jersey Masters; Confirm Commitment to Anti-Idling of Village Vehicles; Accept and Authorize Execution of Bergen County Grant for Lighting at Maple Park Field; Appoint Clean Communities Coordinator; Appoint Recycling Coordinator; and Declare Property Surplus – Police Department Vehicle.

 

  1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

 

Boyd Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that he just wanted to make a couple of comments about Graydon Pool regarding the bathroom renovation project.  Perhaps their inspection process could be better with the roof and some underlying defects.  Regarding the modesty panels, at first sight it is clear that the panels are made of what the contractor cited.  So, this $30,000 they are spending and he takes issue with these contractors that always find something later on.  He asked if they could negotiate it to be a better price because in his opinion they are partly at fault for not seeing this.

 

Mr. Loving added that he echoed the thoughts of Councilwoman Knudsen that social media is key when attempting to get young people to come to anything.  He understands the Director’s concern that sometimes the advertisement isn’t accurate, but if the Parks Department is making it themselves and posting it themselves, why not do that.  He is a regular user of social media and he has seen not one advertisement for lifeguards at Graydon. 

 

Mr. Loving stated that he was driving eastbound on Robinson Lane one day and he noticed that every time you come to a corner there are three stop signs on every corner.  He asked Mr. Rutishauser if that is in compliance with the universal traffic code, and if it isn’t is the Village opening itself up to some type of liability.  He asked the Village Manager to follow up and for Mr. Rogers to, as well.  He added that at Kenilworth and Spring there are also three stop signs.

 

Bob Upton, 172 West Glen Avenue, stated that as far as the plastic bag ban and requiring merchants to have a letter confirming that their bags meet the 125 uses, he can see that it would be unreasonable for them to get the certification printed on the bag but he would encourage them to ensure with a product number that the bag and letter are tied together.

 

There were no additional comments from the public, and Councilwoman Knudsen closed public comment.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if the bids were all based on the same information from Connolly and Hickey, and all of the bid specifications that were responded to were all on the exact same information.  Regarding the signage, the Kenilworth issue was after a number of really bad accidents, but her recollection is because they wanted to do a four way stop but that wasn’t consistent with the Uniform Traffic Code, and from her observation it has been a significant improvement with the three signs, but they will double check the compliance.

 

  1. RESOLUTION TO GO INTO CLOSED SESSION

 

Deputy Village Clerk, Donna Jackson read Resolution #20-27 to go into Closed Session as follows:

 

 

  1. ADJOURNMENT

 

There being no further business to come before the Village Council, on a motion by Councilman Sedon, seconded by Councilman Voigt, and carried unanimously by voice vote, the Village Council’s Work Session was adjourned at 10:33 P.M.

 

 

 

 

 

______________________________

                                                                                                      Susan Knudsen                            

                                                                                                                   Deputy Mayor                   

 

 

 

______________________________

              Donna M. Jackson

           Deputy Village Clerk

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A REGULAR WORK SESSION OF THE VILLAGE COUNCIL OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD HELD IN THE SYDNEY V. STOLDT, JR. COURT ROOM OF THE RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE HALL, 131 NORTH MAPLE AVENUE, RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY ON MARCH 4, 2020 AT 7:30 P.M.

1. CALL TO ORDER – OPEN PUBLIC MEETINGS ACT – ROLL CALL – FLAG SALUTE

Mayor Hache called the meeting to order at 7:30 P.M. and read the Statement of Compliance with the Open Public Meetings Act. At roll call the following were present: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache. Also present were Heather Mailander, Village Manager/Village Clerk; Matthew Rogers, Village Attorney; and Donna Jackson, Deputy Village Clerk.

Mayor Hache led those in attendance in the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag as well as in a Moment of Silence to honor the brave men and women serving in our nation’s armed forces and all our first responders.

2. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

Joseph Ferrante, 610 Hillcrest Road, stated that he was here to commend the Village Council for a very comprehensive and forceful letter to the NJDOT on this issue surrounding the Glenwood Road railroad crossing. He believes it goes some of the way in making up for some lost time and lost ground and he hopes it gets their attention. One of the items in the letter is a plan that has been in existence for almost 50 years for widening Glenwood Road. That is a little disappointing that nothing has surfaced before and that potential was around for some time. He asked if the Village Council might put that plan on the website, as that is probably the strongest case we can make for maintaining the two way road.

Gail McCarthy, 153 Hope Street, stated that she was the new Chairperson of the Kasschau Memorial Band Shell, which is the centerpiece of summer nights in Ridgewood since 1958 and they hope everyone in Ridgewood will take advantage of the amazing concerts this summer. The passing of our long time Chairperson and Volunteer, Jo Delaney in January leaves a large void in our community, but it is the Committee’s goal to make it the best summer yet in her honor. Four generations of the Delaney family live here in Ridgewood and they also hope to honor her in a special way. Jo loved everything about the Shell and was appreciative of the Village’s financial support of the Shell, along with local businesses who contribute year after year. As Jo often reminded us, it is truly a community service to Ridgewood and the surrounding towns and very much appreciated by all of those who attend our summer concerts.

Ms. McCarthy stated that they will be announcing the lineups shortly and send all of the information to the Village to get it up on the website. The concert season starts June 2nd, every Tuesday and Thursday night through August 6th. You can like them on Facebook and Instagram.

There were no additional comments from the public, and Mayor Hache closed public comments.

Mayor Hache stated that he had a good discussion today with one of the Supervisors of Roads in the County, just to bring to their attention that NJDOT never consulted with the County regarding the potential of dumping 2,400 vehicles onto five different County roads. All that the Village asked in the letter that was sent to NJDOT is to have a complete conversation with all of the stakeholders and bring everybody together to come up with a plan that makes sense. Assemblyman DePhillips has been working in trying to get everyone to the table, as well.

3. MANAGERS REPORT

Hudson Street Garage – Ms. Mailander stated that the crane will be moving into the street as of March 9th and it will be there until March 20th. Hudson Street will be closed 24/7 during those dates.

Village Council Candidate Packets – Village Council candidate packets are available in the Village Clerk’s Office. The completed forms are due back to the Village Clerk’s Office by March 9th at 4:00 P.M. There are three Village Council seats up for election.

Poll Worker on Election Day – Ms. Mailander stated that there is an opportunity to be a poll worker in the Village in Election Day. It is $200 for the day, from 5:30 A.M. to 8:30 P.M.

Parking Kiosks – Ms. Mailander stated that parking kiosks are being installed throughout the CBD, and meters are being removed.

Age Friendly Ridgewood – Ms. Mailander stated that they have two presentations coming up, Medicare 101 presented by Sheila Brogan on Wednesday, April 22nd, at 6:30 P.M. in the Library; Mary Creegan will speak about her book “The Scar: A Personal History of Depression and Recovery” on May 6th at 7:00 P.M. at the Library.

Weight Loss Challenge Kickoff – Ms. Mailander stated that the Mayors Wellness Campaign, Parks and Recreation, Healthbarn USA, and the Valley Hospital have joined together to make our Village the healthiest it can be. The Challenge Kickoff will be held Monday, March 9th at Village Hall. To register for the Challenge, call 1-877-283-2276.

Census – The US Census Bureau is currently hiring workers for the 2020 Census. The positions are temporary with various pay ranges, but the pay does start at $19 an hour. If you are interested in a job, please visit the Census Bureau job site to apply.

Recreation Programs – Ms. Mailander stated that “Time to Tone It Up” fitness class Wednesday evenings starting March 18th from 4:45 P.M. to 5:45 P.M. in the Youth Lounge of the Community Center. “Introduction to Beekeeping” is a half day seminar from 11:30 A.M. to 3:30 P.M., Frank Mortimer, Adjunct Instructor at Cornell University Master Beekeeping Program, will present this. It is designed for people that have never kept bees before. Students will gain a basic understanding of what is needed to safely, productively, and enjoyably begin keeping bees. It has just been scheduled for Sunday, April 5th.

Pilot Program – Ms. Mailander stated that the Village was starting a new pilot program, the Food Waste Recycling Program. The USEPA estimates that more food reaches landfills and incinerators than any other single material in our everyday trash. We pay to send the food to the landfill and costs are increasing. To better understand the impact a food waste recycling program could have on the Village, the Ridgewood Division of Recycling will soon begin a small pilot program. Participating residents will be offered two days of the week to deliver food scraps to the Recycling Center and in turn, the Recycling Team will bring the scraps to a facility that will turn the food scraps into compost. Program information and a digital application will be available in the next two to three weeks and will be advertised on the Village website, Recycle Coach mobile app, the Recycling Facebook page, and other areas. If you are interested in participating in this program please keep an eye out and volunteer.

Earth Day - Ms. Mailander stated that Sunday, April 19th is the Earth Day Fair and Daffodil Festival at Memorial Park at Van Neste Square. This year’s theme is “2020 Act Now for A Green Ridgewood.”

Mobile Shredding Event – Saturday, April 25th will be a Mobile Shredding Event from 9:00 A.M. to 12:30 P.M. at the Graydon Pool parking lot. It is free to Ridgewood residents and businesses only. You can watch as your documents are shredded on camera. As soon as the truck is filled, it is over.

Ridgewood Water Utility and the Ridgewood Glen Rock League of Women Voters - Will host a public forum entitled “Healthy Lawn, Healthy Planet.” Featured guest speakers will present information on what a beautiful lawn really needs, how fertilizers, weed killers, and pesticides effect our environment and what less expensive alternatives are available. This will take place on March 24th at 7:00 P.M. at the Thielke Arboretum, 460 Doremus Avenue, Glen Rock. Light refreshments will be served and it is open to the public.

Village Council Upcoming Meetings – March 11th is the Public Meeting and introduction of the 2020 budget. March 25th is the Village Council Work Session, and April 1st is a Village Council Work Session.

Ms. Mailander reminded everyone that this Sunday, March 8th Daylight Saving Time begins so we set our clocks ahead one hour.

4. COUNCIL REPORTS

Shade Tree Commission – Councilman Sedon stated that next Tuesday is a Shade Tree Commission meeting at 7:30 P.M.

Planning Board – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that Planning Board met here last evening at 7:30 P.M. and discussed two site plan courtesy reviews for the Schedler House and the Graydon bathroom, as both of those are Historic Designated Sites. The Planning Board agreed that both were appropriate, and they also reviewed two ordinances that are coming back to the Village Council for adoption. There was a NJ Future presentation and NV5 did a presentation on the Visioning Process and the Master Plan process, and this evening he will be doing the same.

Ridgewood Library – Councilwoman Walsh stated that the Library representatives were there tonight and were going to do a presentation on the upcoming application.

Citizen Safety Advisory Committee – Councilman Voigt stated that CSAC had its meeting on the 19th. There was strong support for the sidewalks along West Glen up to North Monroe. Also, there was strong support for upgrading the light on North Monroe and West Glen. They will be interviewing candidates for the CSAC opening the evening of March 10th, there are two candidates to be interviewed. The guardrail on Glenwood Avenue by the Train Station has been fixed by NJDOT. All of the businesses in Ho-Ho-Kus signed a petition to keep that by-pass two-way.

Bike Safety, educational efforts and sidewalk riding are to be addressed by Middle Schools this spring. There was some concern expressed by members of CSAC regarding a proposal that is under discussion to expand the facilities at Ridgewood High School which includes a 1,000 seat auditorium and some of the potential traffic issues on Ridgewood Avenue, which he thinks is evolving.

Community Center Advisory Board – Councilman Voigt stated that they met on the 19th and a number of events are coming up. The upcoming student mixers at the Community Center are: April 17th 7:30 P.M. to 9:00 P.M. sixth grade mixer, music, and pizza; April 18th Table Tennis Tournament, all ages. May 1st at 7:30 P.M. 7th and 8th grade silent disco; and May 29th 6:30 P.M. to 7:30 P.M. and 8:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M. there is Step Up for the 5th graders to meet future classmates at BF and GW. May 30th there is a student breakfast at Graydon Pool at 11:30 A.M.

5. PRESENTATION

a. NV5 – Master Plan

Mayor Hache thanked Councilwoman Knudsen and the rest of the Master Plan Subcommittee for all of the work that they have done, including Melanie Hooban, Diane O’Brien, and Richard Joel. Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they had been on the Master Plan Subcommittee for two and a half years now and it has been a long and thoughtful process. Mr. Joel stated that it was a very long and deliberate process, and they took a while to get it going and organized, but Neil Desai did a great job. Councilwoman Knudsen stated that as they work through this process, it is a really exciting opportunity for the Village.

Neil Desai, Senior Planner at NV5, has been working with the Master Plan Subcommittee, and they started the process in summer 2018. The website VisionRidgewood.org has been the central internet presence for the project. He shows the Visioning and the Master Plan process together because where they have arrived is that the final report is part of the Master Plan. There are rules and regulations that come from the State that tell you what a Master Plan requires and what the optional elements are. There is a Statement of Objectives that is required, which is this first report that they have created. The Visioning Process has informed this first section, but it also informs the optional elements, which is up to the Village which optional elements they would like to reexamine, and some of this is coming from the Visioning Process. Mr. Desai stated that there is more feedback that occurs beyond the Visioning Process, as well.

Mr. Desai stated that the Visioning outcomes were the Values, Principles, and Priorities, and that is what you see in this document. They have done the Visioning Questionnaire and an online Map Your Vision tool that people could use to plot out different points. There were also focus groups to reach all demographics, and there was an Instagram account, as well. There is a section on the website called Village Voices which holds the summaries of all of the focus groups.

Mr. Desai went over the Preliminary document and stated the Master Plan Statement of Objectives section says that the primary objective of this Master Plan is to guide future decision making and the planning and deployment of public/private efforts and investments in the Village. He added that the Master Plan is a guide of future decision making and how the Village as a public and private entity supports the aspirations of the Ridgewood community for the future.

Mr. Desai stated that every section has a purpose and in the first section they capture what they did in the Visioning Process, the steps and methods that they used. In the Ridgewood Past and Present section they focused on the fact that Ridgewood has evolved through a series of distinct stages. The parking garage is being built, apartments are being built, the Train Station expansion, the Library Reimagine Project, the Valley Hospital expansion, and relocation. So, this is the first time that there have been changes in Ridgewood and this Master Plan process comes at a great time. As the changes come to fruition they will have impacts on the Village. They will start to see what the results of the changes are and will start to be able to respond to them in more strategic ways through the Master Plan.

Mr. Desai spoke about the existing Master Plan and stated that it is a binder that sits in Village Hall which consists of all of these documents together. It includes items from the 1980s as well as items that have been added throughout the years. They want to be sure that this acts as the base for the new Master Plan. Structure of the Village is a section that came out of the main values through the Visioning Process which was to keep a small town/Village feel, and so character is a big part of that. In order to talk about character, he wanted to define what the character of Ridgewood is. The Village is formed by roads and landforms, and these first few pages summarize those and map them. The structure of downtown is important because they want to be able to define the dimensions and elements of downtown that give it that feel. You need those numbers because ultimately when you are looking at changes in downtown you want to make sure that lines up in terms of measurements.

Mr. Desai stated that he goes through the west side of downtown as well, and there is also discussion about the wings of downtown, Chestnut Street and Broad Street. He asked how the dynamics would start to change in the future, so the Master Plan process will look at that. The data shows that Ridgewood has one of the highest percentages of people who work from home. They depicted some basic data showing the different age groups. The data shows that it’s not just a family town, as more than 33% of the Village has been living in the Village for more than 30 years. Individuals 55 and older make up 26% of the Village population.

Mr. Desai stated that the Trends section show that there are certain trends that are impacting the Village. There was a range of responses to the survey in terms of transportation, environmental issues, and climate change. Trends in demographics, aging population, and high taxes, give some context to what is happening in other parts of the country. In each of the sections, they capture how Ridgewood has been responding to the trend. The State has made a requirement that the Master Plan must include a statement regarding storm resiliency with respect to energy supply, flood prone areas, and environmental infrastructure.

Mr. Desai stated that the Visioning Process Outcomes section is the ten things that they learned from the Visioning Process. He listed what things that residents value the most, such as the schools, Library, small town Village feel, the historic downtown, historic architecture, walkable nature, local shops and restaurants, and the Train Station. These came from the questionnaire, Map Your Vision tool, and Focus Groups. The second outcome is to keep a small town/ Village feel, which elicited several different types of responses. He stated that there are a lot of residents that believe in that principle of a small town Village feel, but they see the need for the Village to change, adapt, or evolve into the future in certain respects.

Mr. Desai stated that the questionnaire expressed a lot of sentiments, and they take those sentiments and use them to guide how they are going to move ahead. That starts to set the values, principles, and priorities of where they are going to start in the Master Plan process and what topics require the most attention now. At the beginning of the discussion, they emphasized if something has a low priority that doesn’t mean that it isn’t important to the Village, it’s just that it may not require immediate attention.

Mr. Desai stated that because they are working within a set of rules that the State requires, they talk about some strategic items such as the Master Plan requirements. You want to be able to meet the requirements of the State, and the last major planning product was the 2016 Master Plan Reexamination Report, and they noticed that there was a lot of recommendations in there that were quite consistent with the outcomes of the Visioning Report when they get into the detail of the planning that is going to be an important reference point.

Mr. Desai stated that because there is a complicated existing Master Plan and you don’t want to tackle everything at once, you want to be able to figure out what to do with the existing Master Plan. There is a section that goes through the construction of the Master Plan and what choices can be made. One of the recommendations is that when putting together the optional elements, you want to talk about them holistically, such as the downtown area.

Mr. Desai stated that the last section of the Master Plan is a Statement of Objectives and Principles. This is an actual part of the document that can be interpreted in different ways that needs to have substance in order to really mean something. These are the guiding principles for the Master Plan, so there are the really important filters through which you consider making decisions of the future.

Councilman Sedon asked how this is going to be compiled along with the new ordinances and new sections. Mr. Desai stated that it is up to the Village, as they haven’t had a discussion about the timeline. Contractually, his job is finished once this document is adopted and approved in the final version. They anticipate that is going to happen in May, and when you start digging into the recommendations of the Master Plan, the Planning Board will have to meet to address each section and what they want to do with the existing Master Plan. Councilman Sedon asked through his experience, once a town gets through the Visioning Process how long does it usually take. Mr. Desai stated that things like ordinances are down the line, as the Master Plan is a process. Westfield has just done a downtown Visioning Process and that would be helpful to us. He added that the momentum should be kept and there should be a plan within the next month to start on one part of the Master Plan. The process is going to be a long one because you start with one piece at a time. You want to launch the land use plan first, but at the same time a recommendation is to start doing the downtown plan first, as well.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that there is a lot of data that residents will have to go through. The thing that struck her through all of this was choices and to be proactive. A couple of things that they have been talking about are doing more with less when all of these other changes are going on. She asked if there were any statistics regarding the new developments, there may be a percentage of people that will downsize but is there anything to give a guideline of percentage of each type of transition. Mr. Desai stated that demographic changes can’t rely on census data because it’s not always up to date, but to get actual data from the property owners to get a sense of the new residents would be best. During the Master Plan process get a sense of who are the types of people that are asking about this place, as eventually you would have to build a relationship with the property owner to get a sense of who is moving here.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that she was caught up by the median income and the value of the home. In theory, the median income does not cover the cost to afford a home, so what is the sustainability for us. If the shift in income becomes non-owner occupied, how are they going to keep up with that, or as a community be able to afford all of those services. Mr. Desai stated that as far as future projections, the Trend section gets into that at a macro level. The question in his mind is in terms of housing and given that the millennial generation seems to have a lower income and marries later, are these large homes going to be desirable. The indicators are not going to be coming out in a year or two, but five or ten years when you will see the impact. There is some ability to plan for them, but at least being aware is important.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that the page that depicted what people seemed counterintuitive to what they hear all the time, such as that the school was in the lowest priority. Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the low priority was things that people were satisfied with, so they became a low priority. The lesser satisfaction levels shifted to higher priority. Mr. Desai stated that when they start getting into the details of the Master Plan process, you can’t do everything all at once, so the chart organizes what needs to begin right away. This is a framework and he has some recommendations as some things should be on the same priority level rather than separate, but it is flexible and this is the starting framework.

Councilman Voigt asked about all of the Master Plans in towns surrounding the Village, and he asked if they were homogenous in terms of look and feel and what that means for the Village. Mr. Desai stated that he is going to write an article on this, as towns expect comprehensive plans to look and feel a certain way, but they can be so much better. The general planning profession is starting to improve in comprehensive plans, but he has ideas for improvements in that. One of his goals is to raise expectations of what Master Plans can be especially as far as the physical document, inserting quotes of people and bringing it alive to reflect people in the Village. He hasn’t yet examined surrounding town Master Plans because that is what happens when you get into the details, but he stated that you should raise your expectations of what a Master Plan should be. In the end, he would be satisfied if there was a Master Plan that residents were interested in.

Councilman Voigt asked if the highest percentage of people working from home was out of New Jersey. Mr. Desai stated that it was out of the County, with 10% of people. Councilman Voigt asked about the median income of the people working from home versus the average in town. Mr. Desai stated that he didn’t think the data went into that fine a grain. Councilman Voigt asked about the figures 26% of the residents 55 and over, which is was increasing over time, and one of the high priorities for aging in place. Mr. Desai stated that the general trend is that the portion of people of a certain age is growing faster and faster. There was concern for older people to be able to stay. It is also concerned with the types of houses. He displayed some data from Zillow which projected that in Bergen County’s central area, by 2027 more than 11% of houses currently owned by seniors will be placed on the market.

Councilwoman Knudsen thanked Mr. Desai and her colleagues, and pointed out from the postcard to the level of detail that they sought to obtain through this process was important because they worked so hard to get this right. They look forward to continuing and moving this forward so they can formulate a structure for the public comment. She appreciated the efforts of everyone who promoted this through the use of social media and speaking to neighbors.

Mayor Hache stated that this has been such an interesting process in terms of how this developed. There are so many moving parts and, to see how this all interplays is a very interesting exercise for him. He attended one of the workshops that they hosted and it was unbelievable.

b. COAH Presentation – Beth McManus

Beth McManus with Kyle McManus and Associates presented the Draft Housing Element Fair Share Plan. She will be presenting this before the Planning Board as it has to be adopted by them first, but there is so much that is a Village Council element that it should be presented to them, as well. The biggest issue for the Village Council is the implementation, in ordinances, and resolutions.

Ms. McManus stated that she was here to talk about the housing plan and to see the Village through the process of getting the Judgment of Repose and then the Immunity from Builders Remedy Litigation. All of this started in 2015, but the Village does have a long history of providing affordable housing, as it received substance certification which is the COAH approval of the housing plan in 1990, as well as in 2004. So, there was a foundation that they were able to build upon for this process. In 2015 there was the Mount Laurel Decision which took the power of determining municipal obligations and municipal compliance away from the Council on Affordable Housing and gave it to the courts. That same year, Ridgewood filed a Declaratory Judgement Complaint, telling the court it wanted to comply and wanted immunity from Builder Remedy from doing so.

Ms. McManus stated that as part of that process the Village was required to essentially strike a settlement with Fair Share Housing, and it did so. That was done in 2018, and that settlement agreement put forth the affordable housing obligation and it set forth what it is that the Village is going to do to satisfy it. The settlement agreement was approved by this Village Council in 2018 and later approved by the court in 2019. As a brief reminder, there is the rehabilitation component which is six units; a prior round obligation of 229 units; and a third round of 669 units. Those are huge numbers, and what they have is a vacant land adjustment which is a process that was started by COAH, and the Village actually did that as part of previous substantive certifications and has reduced the prior and third round obligations down to something that is more reasonable. That number was reduced as part of the settlement down to 55 units.

Ms. McManus stated that all of these projects to help the Village meets its 55 units are already built or have already been approved. She stated that the unmet need is new ordinances. In the downtown B-1 and B-2 districts, and this strategy requires an amendment to the two zones to better accommodate affordable housing. Right now, it amends the districts to allow for dwelling units on the upper floors, or have common space on the ground floor, and she also added to allow ground floor units where they do not face a public street. The existing B-1 and B-2 standards allows for affordable housing and points to a different section that tells you the requirements. She amended these standards significantly, as this is what the Village was using to regulate affordable housing. She deleted all of those because one of the other ordinances they will have is an affordable housing regulating ordinance where she takes all of the components that had previously just applied to B-1 and B-2 and put it in a new section that applies to affordable housing anywhere in the Village.

Ms. McManus stated that one of the things they are able to accommodate is maintaining that maximum building height of 50 feet, which continues within the B-1 and B-2 district. One of the things that the Special Master, the Court, and the Fair Share Housing are on the lookout for is to make sure that the Village’s ordinances really make sense. She wanted to make sure that what was intended in the settlement agreement can indeed be constructed.

Ms. McManus stated this was also in the B-2 district but was specific to the portion of North Maple Avenue and the Goffle Avenue B-2 district. She created a new zone because the standards applying to them are the same, so she created a B-3 district and placed it in a new affordable housing district. The permitted use is mixed use and allows dwelling units above. It includes accessory uses that are consistent to what you might see. She tried to make sure that the ordinance works well with the remaining ordinances. It includes a graduated density that was specifically negotiated with Fair Share, and the density increases with the lot size, which ranges between 12 and 20 units an acre. This ordinance also includes a variety of building and site design standards.

Ms. McManus stated that the Affordable Housing (AH3) district which is a few lots located off Route 17 and is similarly structured to the B-3 districts in that it has a graduated density. It ranges between 14 and 18 units an acre, and those same building and site designs apply, but this is a residential only use. It also has single family residences surrounding it.

Ms. McManus stated that the Valley Hospital campus is the last specified location for unmet need zoning. Unlike the ordinances, Fair Share recognizes that this is such a significant site, so they allocated the Village with additional time. They gave the Village up to 18 months to move ahead and create a development area and the designated zoning for it, so this will have to come back. Any future redevelopment plan requires 35 to 45 family designated units to be available on site. Should a redevelopment not occur, the Village will overlay zoning on the property at 12 units an acre with 20% set aside.

Mc. McManus stated that the last item she wanted to talk about was one other ordinance called a mandatory set aside. It is essentially required for every vacant land community and it stated that where the Village or Council grants additional residential density in the amount of five units or more the project is required to do a 20% set aside. If you approve the variance request you have to include the 20% set aside. She recommended the Village Council adopt it because it is in the settlement agreement and also because it will ensure at any time an opportunity for affordable housing comes forward the Village has the power to require the 20% set aside.

Ms. McManus stated that the next steps are she will be before the Planning Board on March 17th in hopes of their adoption of the housing element as part of their Master Plan. Also, there are a number of ordinances and resolutions within the Village Council jurisdiction. There are a number of resolutions that they need the Village Council to endorse and approve. Once all of this is done, they will make a Submission to Court which will hold a hearing and review whether the documents are complaint with the settlement agreement. Then they will end up with the Judgement of Repose which will be conditional on the Valley Hospital site. This will last through 2025.

Councilman Sedon asked if this plan gives the Village a level of comfort and protection against zoning small areas of town and getting sued by developers. Ms. McManus agreed and the ability to defend yourself against that type of situation is why you would adopt it and the housing element so you can protect your zoning. Councilwoman Walsh stated that she thinks it is fair, and nobody could come into town and say that this whole outcome isn’t fair. Councilman Voigt asked how they are able to get around the B-1 and B-2 and B-3. He was assuming in the B-3 there were set asides too. Ms. McManus stated that it is 20% in each of the zones. She went through several mechanisms for unmet need and when they were negotiating there were several choices, and they decided to spread it around. Councilman Voigt asked if developers could come back and ask about certain areas. Ms. McManus stated that they could, but once the plan is in place you can show them the housing plan and they would have to comply with that. Councilwoman Knudsen thanked Ms. McManus and Mr. Rogers and stated that the outcome is not only fair but compliments the needs of Fair Share Housing and the Village of Ridgewood.

Ms. McManus stated that she thinks that the Village is in a good position as the settlement that was negotiated was much more advantageous to the Village than some other settlements she had seen. Part of that was the Village’s willingness to work with Fair Share. There are surplus credits to the Realistic Development Potential (RDP), the unmet need zone was kept with the density relatively low compared to other municipalities, also the timing knowing that the Affordable Housing Plan is adopted and allows you to focus on all of the other things that are going to come up in the Master Plan and you don’t have to worry about the housing taking priority over everything else. Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she found the process with Fair Share was fair and they were not unreasonable, and they were open and understood the importance of maintaining the uniqueness of the Village. Mayor Hache stated that this was really interesting as there was a lot of work and they are in a good place for the future and the fact that they can feel a lot more comfortable and envision the future.

c. Reimagine Ridgewood Public Library

Nancy Greene introduced Gail Campbell; Rocco Orlando, Library Trustee; Rebecca Rubenstein; Paul McCarthy, Friends of the Library; Tom DeVita, Foundation; and Assistant Director Laurie Steinbrock.

Rocco Orlando stated that they took all of the comments they received from the public, and how to use the space, and what would work and integrate into the needs of the users, and brought that to the architect. They have boards showing the floor plans prior and then how the adjusted it. He talked about how the previous design looked and changed the Library. On the new plan they were conscious of the existing structure and tasked the architect with a stair that got light from the second floor, and had a welcoming space. They shifted the stair over to the side, and on the rendering they created a stair that is done in various libraries creating stairs and bleachers within that space and integrating the functions around that stair as part of the Library. The Circulation Desk is shifted over and Lending Services is joined to that space. They looked at the need of the Library and how much they could function in that space so they reduce the office areas and increased other spaces that needed more space to function. The teen area increased in size and creates a larger gathering space for them.

Mr. Orlando stated that on the second floor, they had the circular stair that took up a bit of space and they reduced that quite a bit. The mezzanine expanded as it did on the prior design, but the stair is reduced in size and there is more space for functioning in the Library. There was a staff lounge and meeting room upstairs and they reconfigured that space to make it functionally better. He stated that they went through the budget and tried to see where they could save. In doing so, they also looked at what they were carrying before on existing elements in the building that they know have to become part of the renovation that they didn’t have in play initially when this budget was developed because there are now things that they have to incorporate that they didn’t prior. The roof needs to be replaced, as well as the HVAC equipment, and a generator that they worked into the plan.

Mr. Orlando stated that they feel that they can come to a savings of $500,000 overall in the project. They have part of the grant and an estimator that has to compile a full estimate as part of the application and they are working on that. He was able to review the estimates that they received before, and then he looked at the elements that were changed and added back in, and doing all that they are at approximately a $500,000 savings.

Councilman Voigt asked how that changes their “ask” and if they were still asking the Village Council for $2 million. Mr. Orlando stated that they were looking at an ask of $1.6 million. Councilwoman Walsh added that the team has been working around the clock because the application deadline is looming. They were considering a generator, so in case of an emergency the Library would be able to operate as a safe space. Also, they were about to reconfigure the space and it was a challenge to not lose anything in the design, and they accomplished that. Councilman Sedon stated that this design has more usable space and he liked the idea of the generator. Ms. Greene stated that the Library hasn’t flooded in the 25 years that she has been there.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked about the original plans, the original $2 million, and that $8 million did not include the roof. Ms. Campbell stated that part of that was at the time this was originally evaluated six years ago, the roof had a decent life expectancy. Now, they are looking at the roof again. Councilwoman Knudsen asked about the equipment that was included now. Mr. Orlando stated that would be the HVAC, and a generator. Councilwoman Knudsen asked about the new stair design with the bleacher effect as it seemed a stark difference from the original staircase. Mr. Orlando stated that he thinks it is great, is more incorporated with the plan, complements the adjoining spaces, and is multi-function. It also provides them with more functional space around it. Ms. Campbell added that it is also not impacting the beams as they are now, and should not be considerably costly compared to the spiral staircase. Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she thinks through the process that the staircase is a more functional outcome and complements the plan.

Mayor Hache stated that they have done a tremendous job and he loves the staircase as it is a great element to add to the plan. He was pleased with the numbers and added that what is here now touches on all of the different spots that weren’t addressed with the previous design. Councilman Voigt asked if the redesign was less or more functional space. Mr. Orlando stated that it was a lot more functional, it is the same footprint but they really looked at spaces and integrating them better into the plan. Ms. Rubenstein stated that they don’t have every single item figured out exactly, but they could figure that out for the Village Council. Mr. Orlando stated that you are probably a third of what it was. Councilwoman Knudsen wanted to acknowledge Mr. Orlando’s work on this as well.

6. DISCUSSION

a. Ridgewood Water

1. Ordinance for Revised Water Rates

Mr. Calbi stated that the first ordinance is a follow up from the budget meeting on Monday with the proposed rate increase on the water rent with a 39 cent per thousand gallon rate increase, which is an 8% increase. This is due to the increase in the debt payment for the utility and their three year projection as debt is increasing and the need to maintain a certain amount for operating expense. The rate is going from $4.82 to $5.21 per thousand gallons that would be effective with the third quarter bill this year.

2. Ordinance for Revised Water Fees

Mr. Calbi stated that they have had the need to redo what has been codified in the water fee ordinance. This is an overhaul of the wording and fee structure for the Water Department. Most of this won’t result in new revenue but codify things they have been doing for a long time. This includes the two fixed rate or facility charges for the 3 inch and 4 inch meters and the recalculated connection fee, which goes up slightly.

Mr. Timmeny stated that this is a lot of revised wording and better itemization of the fees. There are things that have been in the code for 20 years and were no longer used or relevant which confused people. It was better for them to spell out the changes and provides a pricing sheet for the field support based off the ordinance. One of the things that did change was the 3 inch and 4 inch rates for the calculations. Flush tank service is no longer relevant so that was deleted, and there were additional things that were removed to clean up the language. The new water service connection is the audited figure provided to them, so that is a small change from $3,575 to $3,730 per unit.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that you don’t usually see the service fees unless you are renovating or doing any kind of construction.

3. Award Contract – Public Communications

Ms. Mailander stated that in 2018 they hired H&G Public Affairs for the public notification supplement and would like to hire them again for the current public notification supplement. They will be hourly, in an amount not to exceed $4,000.

4. Award Contract – Landscaping Services

Ms. Mailander stated that they went out for bid with eight bid packets picked up and two received. The annual bid price includes a $25,000 allowance for miscellaneous services. The low bidder was $100,000. The services provided will include spring cleanup, edging, trimming, debris cleanup, mowing, fall clean up, and gutter cleaning at system locations. The low bidder is Clarke Moynihan Landscaping and Construction of Andover. It is the first year of a two-year bid, and the funding is in the Water Utility operating budget.

b. Parking

1. Update on Amending Time for General Parking in Lots

Ms. Mailander stated that in February, they changed it so that people could park in parking lots after 3:00 P.M. Now, they are proposing that in the station plaza lot, anyone can park there from 12:00 P.M. on and no resident sticker is needed. They must pay for the space up until 8:00 P.M. Monday through Friday or until 6:00 P.M. Saturday. She spoke with Sergeant Chuck about someone parking there for eight hours, and asked about a three hour limit. Sergeant Chuck stated that it would be very difficult for the Parking Enforcement Officers to limit the time accurately. As for the other lots, they don’t have to change it to noon because there are no set commuter spots, and if they are full or not it’s either shopper/diner or commuter. Mayor Hache stated that in Chestnut there are designated commuter lots. Ms. Mailander stated that it would apply there then, as well.

Mayor Hache asked about the enforcement possibility for a three hour limit and for clarification on mode of payment. Ms. Mailander stated that payment is through the kiosk or Parkmobile and that she would go back and ask Sergeant Chuck about the enforcement. Councilwoman Walsh stated that had been the problem with Parkmobile as you could pull in, and then pull out and to another spot and then you have moved. Mayor Hache stated that one of the things that they talked about in CBDAC was can they have no repeat parking within an hour of parking in a previous session anywhere in the downtown in the same zone. Councilwoman Knudsen stated that complicates the issue. Ms. Mailander stated that they are trying to make this simpler but it becomes more complicated for people who want to try to use the parking lots correctly and the rules keep changing. She added that she would get a better explanation.

2. Update on West Ridgewood Avenue – 15-Minute Parking Spaces

Ms. Mailander stated that the wording was changed to include the 15 minute spaces within the ordinance.

c. Budget

1a. Budget Wrap-Up

Mr. Rooney stated that he heard from Councilman Sedon and Councilman Voigt in terms of their priorities. Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they have another $400,000 from the Library, but added that she really does wish they could find a way for the Village to have another $200,000. The sidewalks that were important to Councilman Voigt were $150,000 and the trees that were important to Councilman Sedon were $110,000. She asked if that allowed them to do the Fire House kitchen and the shower for Sean Hamlin. Mr. Rooney stated that puts $150,000 for the sidewalks and $110,000 for the trees. Councilwoman Knudsen added the cardboard compactor was $45,000 which would resolve the issue of the folks behind having to hear the noise all day on a Saturday. Mr. Rooney stated that number is now $8,394,000. Councilwoman Knudsen asked Mr. Rooney to take out the $400,000 from the Library. Councilwoman Walsh added that the timeline on Schedler was another issue. Ms. Mailander stated that it was $1 million for the house and the field. Councilman Sedon stated that once the grants come in that goes immediately to paying down the debt service.

Mr. Rooney stated that after making those adjustments, you are $8,394,000 as he took $400,000 out of the Library, added in everything including the financing costs and they are at $8.4 million. Councilman Voigt asked about the West Glen signal as that is important. Mr. Rooney stated that they were up to $8.6 million. Councilwoman Knudsen asked where they were on the $8.4. Mr. Rooney stated that they would need another $4,000 to cover the capital improvement fund. The down payment of capital will mean the operating fund has to go up by $4,000. Councilman Voigt asked where that puts them in the net debt ratio. Mr. Rooney stated that they were slightly higher but would still be less than 1%.

Councilman Voigt asked about the underground fuel storage tank. Ms. Mailander stated that the issue is that is thirty years old and they want to replace them because of the 1980s fuel tank spill and the gasoline went down onto Oak Street and effected homes there. Councilman Voigt asked why that happened. Mr. Rooney stated that the tank that had a leak and caused the Village to purchase 210 Oak Street as part of the remediation effort, plus a lot of other work. The leaking tanks were replaced, and the tanks that were put in have a life expectancy of 30 years and they are now about 32 years old. There have been a couple technical issues with the tanks and they want to replace them while they are still in good graces with the NJDEP. Councilman Voigt asked if they were okay with the tanks today. Mr. Rutishauser stated they were okay with the tanks today, but they are past their life expectancy and it would be prudent planning to plan and anticipate their replacements prior to a catastrophic failure primarily because they have already faced that. Councilman Voigt asked if he was nervous about a catastrophic failure. Mr. Rutishauser stated that he was nervous enough to ask for the money to replace them.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked what they did with Kings Pond and where that left off. Mr. Rooney stated that they were presented with $155,000 and he took $155,000 off. Mayor Hache asked what the remaining work was. Mr. Rutishauser stated that right now they are removing the dredged soils, the next phase would be the final landscaping and beautification of the area that was dredged. Councilwoman Knudsen asked how much money they had remaining. Ms. Mailander stated that they were above where they were previously. Councilman Sedon stated that he wasn’t comfortable going any higher. Ms. Mailander confirmed the things that they were putting pack in, including the Fire House kitchen, cardboard compactor, West Glen sidewalks, trees, West Glen signal, and the Sanitation bathroom. Councilwoman Knudsen asked where they were. Mr. Rooney stated that they were at $8,559,261. Ms. Mailander confirmed that included the financing cost.

Ms. Mailander stated that they would be ready to introduce next week and then the other capital ordinances.

2. Award Professional Services Contract – Zabriskie-Schedler House – Phase II Revised

Ms. Mailander stated that over the past year, Zabriskie-Schedler House has undergone mostly the exterior renovation, although there was asbestos abatement inside. The exterior shingles were removed, they were replaced and painted. The window framing and reglazing is ongoing. The roof was installed with two chimneys restored and the stone foundation repointing work. To complete it and make it suitable and safe for public programming, new interior systems need to be installed, which includes HVAC, plumbing repair, install electric wiring, new electric service box, security fire protection, as well as project considerations. To cover the cost of the work, they anticipate submitting two grants and they will need Connolly and Hickey to help prepare them. They are proposing a not to exceed amount of $4,750. This is the first time they have ever applied to the New Jersey Historic Preservation Trust.

Councilwoman Walsh asked what the date is that the applications are due. Ms. Mailander stated that they needed a letter of intent by April and then it was May when they were due, but they don’t award until the fall.

3. Award Contract – Paving

Ms. Mailander stated this was our annual paving. There were ten plan holders eligible to bid, they received nine bids, and the low bidder was American Asphalt and Milling Services of Kearny in an amount of $2,538,450.91. The low bidder submitted a complete bid package and was the Village’s paving contractor for 2019. This work is to be funded from the 2020 Capital Budget. She recommended a partial award of $2 million. Councilwoman Knudsen asked if there were any trees. Ms. Mailander stated that there weren’t any trees in the bid because it didn’t work out last year as they were so much more expensive.

4. Award Contract – Kings Pond Restoration

Ms. Mailander stated that there were 13 plan holders eligible to bid, and the Village received 6 bids. The low bid was from Wetlands, Inc. of Saddle Brook with a quote of $239,184. The low bidder submitted a complete bid package with all necessary information. They are a new firm to the Village and this is the final improvements at Kings Pond. The bid is greater than the funds that are available, so they are recommending a partial award of $130,784 to start the critical elements of the project, as soon as possible.

5. Award Contract – Affordable Housing Administrative Agent

Ms. Mailander stated that this will be the entity that will help administer the affordable housing units in each of the multi-family units. They received two proposals, one is from CME Associates and the other is from Piazza and Associates. The difference from what she can see is that CME has given a full accounting for all of their costs, and Piazza gave a proposal and then an a la carte menu. CME provided a full bid packet, and Piazza did but their insurance was not at the level that the Village would want. She asked if the Village Council would like to interview them, but they have to move on this as they have to be part of the marketing plan for the multi-family units. There was an agreement to interview by the Village Council. Ms. Mailander stated that they would get it done as soon as possible and then hopefully adopt it in April.

6. Award Contract – Tire Purchasing – Fleet Services

Ms. Mailander stated that these are both new and recapped tires from vendors under State Contract. The award is recommended to Kirk’s Tire and Auto and Hudson Tire Exchange in an amount not to exceed $59,000.

7. Award Contract Under State Contract – Parts and Vehicle Maintenance Services – Fleet Services

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for various parts needed from various vendors on the New Jersey State Contract. It depends what the item is as far as who is awarded the contract. The total is not to exceed $357,000 and it is out of the 2020 operating budget.

8. Declare Surplus – Graydon Pool Equipment

Ms. Mailander stated that there are two Taylor Ice Cream Machines. The first was purchased in 2003, and it was used until 2012. The other was donated by Parkwood Deli and was used until 2012. The concession stand was privatized and they didn’t want to serve ice cream in that way, and the machines have been sitting at Recreation.

d. Policy

1. Dog Waste Bags in Parks

Ms. Mailander stated that there has been a proposal to have dog waste bag dispensers in several parks, and Parks employees would fill the dispensers as part of their regular duties. The waste bag container would have to be put next to the dispensers so that dog owners could dispose of their bags. She stated that this is a health concern as the dog waste bags sit in the regular garbage that are only picked up two days a week. The garbage would have to be clear as per Police regulations. The Village Code required residents to dispose of their solid waste and the responsibility does not fall on the Village. There is the risk that the dispensers could run out and people would assume that the bags are there and rather just leave the waste. She added that some people will look at this as a free giveaway, in which case they will run out more quickly. She stated that the National and State parks have a carry in/carry out rule. There are 1,567 households that own one or more dogs, which equates to 21% that have a dog.

Ms. Mailander stated that she received an email today from a resident who is against the Village providing the bags for waste citing all the same reasons that Ms. Mailander had stated previously.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that her understanding was having the bags there for the odd moment that somebody didn’t bring a bag with them so that it wasn’t left on the ground. As a dog owner, she wouldn’t assume that it was always going to be the Village maintaining the dog bags, but that the idea what that it would be available for somebody that either forgot it or needed another bag. Councilwoman Knudsen stated that presently the trash cans are clear, and you see whatever is in there, but somehow now the small bag of dog waste is now offensive. Ms. Mailander stated that she thinks it is going to be more likely to smell. Councilwoman Knudsen stated that people walk their dogs now and pick up their dog waste and already throw it away all the time.

Mayor Hache asked if there was an estimate of the cost. Ms. Mailander stated that she didn’t know. Mayor Hache asked if there was anything preventing people from bringing their own bag and picking up after their dog. Ms. Mailander stated that she saw Councilwoman Walsh’s point but didn’t know how you would ensure that people still brought their own bags. Councilwoman Walsh stated that you publicize it so that the intent is if you forget your bag.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if someone’s dog is runs around the park alone, it would be Parks that would be cleaning it up. Somebody still has to clean it, so isn’t it better that they encourage people to do the right thing and give them that option. Ms. Mailander stated that every dog owner she spoke to said it was their responsibility and not something that the Village should provide. Councilwoman Knudsen stated that nobody was saying that it’s not a dog owner’s responsibility to bring a bag, but what Councilwoman Walsh is saying they have to decide if this is a viable project. Mayor Hache stated that they should start with the cost. Councilman Sedon stated that if you have one central collection point where people are directed to put it, it could get offensive quickly.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that in the summer they don’t collect the garbage on the weekends. She added that she agreed with Mayor Hache that they have to look at the cost. Ms. Mailander asked how they would know how many bags were needed. Councilwoman Knudsen stated they would have to look to see how many bags it takes to fill it. Ms. Mailander stated that they could work on the numbers.

e. Operations

1. Liquor License Transfer – Elks Club

Ms. Mailander stated that this is the Elks Club liquor license transfer to John Steingraber d/b/a Signature Cocktails, LLC. The Elks Club is a pocket liquor license so this is a person to person and place to place transfer. They have paid the appropriate fees and the Police Department approves of this transfer.

2. Authorize and Accept Execution of Bergen County Grant – Permanent Lighting at Maple Park

Ms. Mailander stated that Muscoe Lighting is the vendor and this is for LED lighting, removing the environmental challenges of the portable light towers. The funding for this project will be through a Bergen County Open Space Trust Fund Matching Grant of $145,000, to be matched by the Village of Ridgewood Capital Budget of $145,000, and a $140,000 donation from the Ridgewood Youth Sports Groups. The total price will not exceed $430,000. This resolution would accept the Bergen County Open Space Trust Fund Grant. There will be another resolution to adept the donation of $140,000. Maroons Soccer is providing $54,000, Ridgewood Lacrosse is providing $42,000, Ridgewood Soccer Association $30,000, Ridgewood Baseball Softball Association $7,000, and Ridgewood Junior Football $7,000.

7. REVIEW OF MARCH 11, 2020 PUBLIC MEETING AGENDA

The following is a review of the March 11, 2020 Public Meeting Agenda.

Proclamations include: Proclaim March Red Cross Month; and Proclaim March Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month.

2020 Budget Introduction: Budget Message; Introduction – Ordinance 3784 – Establish a CAP Bank.

2020 Budget Resolutions: Approve Temporary Water Utility Capital Budget; Approve Temporary General Capital Budget; and Approve 2020 Municipal Budget and Set April 15, 2020 as the Date for the Public Hearing Thereon.

Ordinances for Introduction for Ridgewood Water: 3785 – Bond Ordinance – Water Utility Capital; 3786 – Revise Water Rates; and 3787 – Amend Chapter 145 – Fees – Ridgewood Water Utility Fees.

Resolutions for Ridgewood Water: Award Contract – Trolley Gate Repair at Wortendyke Facility; Award Contract – Public Communications; Award Contract – Landscaping Services; Establish Interest Rates for Delinquent Payments to the Water Utility for 2020 and Set Grace Period for Payment of Water Utility Bills; and Accept Ridgewood Water Annual Maintenance Fee.

Ordinances for Introduction: 3788 – Bond Ordinance – Lighting for Maple Park Field; 3789 – Bond Ordinance – General Capital; 3790 – Amend Chapter 265 – Vehicles and Traffic – Parking in Station Plaza after 12:00 P.M.; 3791 – Amend Vehicles and Traffic – 15-minute Parking Spaces on West Ridgewood Avenue; and 3792 – Amend Single Use Plastic Bag Ordinance.

Ordinances for Public Hearing include: 3781 – Bond Ordinance – Paving of South Broad Street; 3782 – Bond Ordinance – Paving of Spring Avenue; and 3783 – Amend Chapter 190 – Land Use and Development – Winter Door Enclosures – Timeframe Allowed.

Resolutions include: Endorse Submission of Recycling Tonnage Grant; Appoint Tax Assessor; Award Contract – Purchase of Tires; Title 59 Approval – Road Resurfacing; Award Contract – Road Resurfacing; Title 59 Approval – Kings Pond Restoration; Award Contract – Kings Pond Restoration; Award Contract Under State Contract – Purchase of Diesel Fuel and Gasoline; Award Contract Under State Contract – Purchase of Manholes, Catch Basin Frames and Grates; Award Vehicle Contract Under State Contract – Parts and Vehicle Maintenance Services; Award Professional Services Contract – Zabriskie-Schedler House Phase II Revised; Award Professional Services Contract – Administrative Agent for Affordable Housing; Establish Interest Rate for Non-Payment of Taxes and Assessments for 2020 and Set Grace Period; Establish Interest Rates for Non-Payment of Other Municipal Liens for 2020 and Set Due Date; Establish Interest Rate for Delinquent Payments for Significant Sewer Discharger Bills for 2020; Extend Sublease Agreement of 43-45 Hudson Street for EPIC Management; Authorize Tax Appeal Refund – 265 Ackerman Avenue; Accept Donation from Sports Groups – Permanent Lighting at Maple Park Field; Accept and Authorize Execution of Grant Agreement – Permanent Lighting at Maple Park Field; Declare Property Surplus – Graydon Pool Equipment; and Approve Person to Person and Place to Place Liquor License Transfer – Elks Club to Signature Cocktails, LLC.

8. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

Anne Loving, 342 South Irving Street, thanked the Village Council for passing the ordinance that allows dogs to be in all the parks as she really appreciated it. In terms of the discussion about the waste bags, as Councilwoman Walsh said the girl scouts may be able to manage it, and at least one family has already volunteered to donate to this project. The cost is minimal as she looked it up before, and the bags can be biodegradable. The thing about the garbage cans is that the waste bags are all over town. Every town that she is familiar with has the dispensers and it wouldn’t be something that dog owners would depend on as they already carry bags, it would just be as a courtesy or also as a gentle reminder to the occasional person who might not have brought bags. She added that the time to reload the dispenser should only be about 30 seconds and shouldn’t be an added burden on the Parks Department.

Boyd Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that he also wanted to thank this Village Council for passing the ordinance that permits him and his wife to walk their dog around Vets Field. He also added that he has been going to Village Council meetings regularly since 2000 and he has never heard a Manager give preceding comments to a discussion as negative as the comments that were given this evening. He is outraged by them and personally offended as a dog owner that there was nothing but negative comments about why this wouldn’t work. He added that he was going to OPRA those remarks and publish them.

There were no additional comments from the public, and Mayor Hache closed public comment.

9. RESOLUTION TO GO INTO CLOSED SESSION

Deputy Village Clerk Donna Jackson read Resolution #20-60 to go into Closed Session as follows:

10. ADJOURNMENT

There being no further business to come before the Village Council, on a motion by Councilwoman Knudsen, seconded by Councilwoman Walsh, and carried unanimously by voice vote, the Village Council’s Work Session was adjourned at 11:27 P.M.

 

 ______________________________

Ramon M. Hache, Sr.
Mayor

 

______________________________
Donna M. Jackson
Deputy Village Clerk

 

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A REGULAR WORK SESSION OF THE VILLAGE COUNCIL OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD HELD IN THE SYDNEY V. STOLDT, JR. COURT ROOM OF THE RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE HALL, 131 NORTH MAPLE AVENUE, RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY ON FEBRUARY 26, 2020 AT 7:30 P.M.

1. CALL TO ORDER – OPEN PUBLIC MEETINGS ACT – ROLL CALL – FLAG SALUTE

Mayor Hache called the meeting to order at 7:30 P.M. and read the Statement of Compliance with the Open Public Meetings Act. At roll call the following were present: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Walsh, and Mayor Hache. Also present were Heather Mailander, Village Manager/Village Clerk; Matthew Rogers, Village Attorney; and Donna Jackson, Deputy Village Clerk. Councilman Voigt was absent.

Mayor Hache led those in attendance in the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag as well as in a Moment of Silence to honor the brave men and women serving in our nation’s armed forces and all our first responders.

2. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

Richard Brooks, 777 East Ridgewood Avenue, stated that he wanted to express support of bonding on behalf of Maple Park East lighting project. This is an evolutionary next step for Maple Park, one of the most heavily used recreation facilities in the Village. Two years ago they replaced the turf surface, and the lighting system will increase opportunities for Village residents to use the facilities. They currently use diesel powered construction lighting after dark, which are antiquated, environmentally dirty, and energy inefficient. They were not designed for athletic field lighting, whereas the proposed lighting was designed for field illumination and is state of the art in terms of design, energy usage, and lighting efficiency.

Mr. Brooks stated that the investment in this Village facility is unique. The Village, the County, and a consortium of Village sports organizations will utilize the field. This is a continued investment by the sports organizations towards the facilities that they play on and in. He added that more and more adults are starting to play recreational team sports, like soccer, flag football, baseball, and softball. In addition, the recent closure of the Orchard School field will lead to a juggling of the Spring schedule. He urged the Village Council to support this investment in our community.

Hans Jorgen Lehman, 234 Union Street, stated that an incident occurred at the Village Council meeting on February 19, 2020 when a resident spoke about an article which appeared in The Record the following day. The article makes reference to an event that took place in Elmwood Park between a Borough Councilmember and an employee of the Borough. The resident in question then made reference to what he deemed to be a similar situation in the Village and made a request that the Village Council launch an investigation into the situation. Mr. Lehman stated that he strenuously objected to the comments made by the resident who seems to have appointed himself as a member of some sort of local moral police. Anyone in that room on that day, knew what he was referring to, and he finds this behavior to be beyond deplorable and inappropriate for a Village Council meeting. He added that he found the Village Council’s behavior to be equally deplorable for entertaining those comments.

Mr. Lehman stated that he has been to plenty of Village Council meetings where comments were shut down by the Councilmembers. However, that wasn’t the case in this situation. He would even venture to say that the Village Attorney could have objected to what was being said because it was reprehensible. As long as they are asking for investigations into unnamed parties, he asked that the resident who spoke might be investigated. On what basis is he asking for an investigation, is he stalking the unnamed parties or are other enabling him. He asked if there was a conspiracy to do harm to unnamed individuals. Mr. Lehman asked if this individual was given access to information that a normal individual might not have. He stated that the Village Council is in the position to put a stop to this type of behavior at Village Council meetings, and asked them to do so for the sake of civility and fair and just government.

There were no additional comments from the public, and Mayor Hache closed public comments.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the hypocrisy in the last comment should not be lost on anyone at all.

3. MANAGERS REPORT

Hudson Street Garage – Ms. Mailander stated that the crane is there at Hudson Street, and they are moving the precast into place. The corner area is now standing. There will be closures during the day on Hudson Street, and South Broad Street will be closed intermittently during the day. Both roads will be open to traffic during the evening.

Village Council Candidate Packets – Village Council candidate packets are available in the Village Clerk’s Office. The completed forms are due back to the Village Clerk’s Office by March 9th at 4:00 P.M. There are three Village Council seats up for election.

Poll Worker on Election Day – Ms. Mailander stated that there is an opportunity to be a poll worker in the Village in Election Day. It is $200 for the day, from 5:30 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. You must be at least 18 years old, a Bergen County resident, registered to vote, and must attend a two hour training class. If interested, contact the Bergen County Board of Elections.

Parking Kiosks – Ms. Mailander stated that parking kiosks are being installed throughout the CBD, and should be completed in the next couple of weeks. When using the kiosks, you enter a license plate and pay using coins or credit card. There is a 3% convenience fee for using a credit card. You do not have to display the receipt. The 15 minute parking spaces at the end of each side street will remain in effect with meters.

Carfax – Ms. Mailander stated that the Police Department has started using Carfax which will allow accident reports to be available online 24/7. This allows people who were involved in accidents and not available during the Records Department hours to get their reports. Carfax charges customers for the service and donates $5 per hour to the Ridgewood Police Department.

Life Guards at Graydon Pool – In preparation for the summer, there is a need for certified Life Guards at Graydon Pool. The American Red Cross is advertising a waterfront lifeguard training at a sand bottom facility in May or June.

Age Friendly Ridgewood – Ms. Mailander stated that there were several Age Friendly Ridgewood presentations being scheduled at the Library. There will be an Elder Law presentation, including Estate Planning and Elder Law issues, Tuesday, March 3rd from 6:30 P.M. to 7:30 P.M. Medicare 101 will be presented by Sheila Brogan on April 22nd at 6:30 P.M. Mary Creegan will speak about her book, ‘The Scar: A Personal History of Depression and Recovery’ on May 6th at 7:00 P.M.

Weight Loss Challenge Kickoff – Ms. Mailander stated that the Weight Loss Challenger Kickoff, sponsored by the Mayor’s Wellness Campaign, the Ridgewood Health Department, Fitness Academy, Healthbarn USA, and Valley Hospital will be held on Monday, March 9th at Village Hall. To register for the challenge please call.

U.S. Census Bureau – Ms. Mailander stated that the U.S. Census Bureau is currently hiring for the 2020 Census. The positions are temporary with varying pay. The pay starts at $19 per hour, and if you are interested in a job, please visit the Census Bureau website to apply.

Recreation Programs – Ms. Mailander stated that the recreation program, “Time to Tone It Up”, fitness class is on Wednesday evenings starting March 18th from 4:45 P.M. to 5:45 P.M. in the Community Center. The Introduction to Beekeeping, will be taught by Frank Mortimer, Adjunct Instructor at Cornell University Master Beekeeping program. The seminar is designed for people who have never kept bees before. Students will gain a basic understanding of what is needed to safely, productively, and enjoyably begin keeping bees. It is being held Sunday, March 8th from 11:30 A.M. to 3:30 P.M.

Upcoming Events in April – Ms. Mailander stated that Sunday, April 19th is the Earth Day and the Daffodil Festival at Memorial Park at Van Neste Square, from 11:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. This year’s theme is ‘2020 Act Now For A Green Ridgewood,’ which highlights the importance of sustainability and showcases how Green Ridgewood assists the Village in going green. There are many eco-themed activities.

There is a Mobile Shredding Event on Saturday, April 25th from 9:00 A.M. to 12:30 P.M. in the Graydon parking lot, rain or shine. It is free to Ridgewood residents and businesses, and you can watch as your documents are destroyed.

Village Council Upcoming Meetings – Monday, March 2nd is the final Budget Meeting with the Village Council at 5:00 P.M. March 4th is a Work Session at 7:30 P.M. and there will be a presentation by NV5 on the Master Plan Visioning, and then the Ridgewood Library project will present an updated plan. March 11th is the Village Council Public Meeting and the presentation of the 2020 budget will take place at that meeting. March 25th is a Village Council Public Work Session.

4. COUNCIL REPORTS

Planning Board – Councilwoman Knudsen stated the Planning Board will be meeting Tuesday evening at 7:30 P.M. New Jersey Futures, NV5, and the Master Plan Committee will be doing presentations. There is an opportunity for questions.

Ridgewood Library – Councilwoman Walsh stated that there were only about 50 tickets left for the Authors Luncheon. She added that the Library would come back next week with the updated plans for the Library. The application is very cumbersome and they have been working hard to get the application done by the deadline.

Maple Field Lighting Project– Mayor Hache stated that the Maple Field Lighting Project will be brought in for a vote by the Village Council at the next Public Meeting on March 11th.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she didn’t think about the number of teams that are playing, including kids and adults. She wondered if there was an inventory of the teams that are playing. Mayor Hache stated that there was list in the Fields Committees schedule. Councilwoman Knudsen asked for the list as she would be interested to see it.

Glenwood Road – Mayor Hache stated that last week they discussed Glenwood Road, and there was a discussion in Closed Session, and he wanted to give an update. They just sent out a letter to NJDOT with the position that there has to be a more collaborative approach to discussion regarding Glenwood Road. From a safety standpoint, the plan is an improvement to the intersection, but it is lacking with the impact to the community. The 2,400 cars that travel that road everyday are now going to sprawl out onto 5 county roads, and the County was never brought into the discussion. He added that the Village was asking for a more robust discussion, and when you look at the safety measures, widening the road was never considered. There are plans from the late 1970’s for the improvement to the road, and it needs to be a part of the discussion.

Ms. Mailander added that they are discussing the Maple Park Lighting Project later in this meeting, as well.

5. PRESENTATION

a. NJ Future

Ms. Mailander stated that the group is comprised of Richard Joel, Maryanne Bucci-Carter, Sheila Brogan, and Beth Abbott. They went to a presentation by Tonya Rohrbach of NJ Future, and this presentation is what was decided was important for Ridgewood.

Sheila Brogan stated they were there as a follow-up as two weeks ago Tonya from NJ Future made the presentation to the Village Council, and this is what they have come up with NJ Future, the Village of Ridgewood, and Age Friendly Ridgewood. The project has been funded for NJ Future through the Taub Foundation that has funded the Age Friendly Ridgewood Initiative.

In September and December, a group of people from the Village were involved in looking at the report that came from NJ Future with a number of recommendations. They prioritized the recommendations and formalized some action ideas in an effort to look at improving Ridgewood’s Age Friendliness.

Ms. Abbott stated that they looked at land use in Ridgewood, and the challenges it presents for older residents. Two main things kept coming up: the pedestrian safety, and housing choices. They concluded that Age Friendly Ridgewood has done two large community surveys. There have been a lot of focus groups and they have recommendations from the two professional studies. With the professional guidance of NJ Future, the project committee identified goals that involved pedestrian safety, housing diversity, mixed use downtown, engaging residents, and supporting community design goals.

Ms. Abbott added that the group dug deeper into these broad goals and identified specific actions that they could pursue such as problematic intersections, complete street strategies, pop-up traffic calming, strategies to diversify housing options, looking at street furniture and bus stops, and establishing a phased sidewalk and crosswalk improvement plan.

Mr. Joel stated that Age Friendly is seeking to promote certain priorities as they effect older individuals. The Ridgewood Planning Board has a visioning project going on right now to create a new Master Plan which will set forth the priorities in the Village. There is certain work that will cross over into the work that was done by NV5 and the Master Plan that will eventually be prepared. There is an aging population, and seniors, as a group, have different needs.

Ms. Bucci-Carter stated that most Master Plan documents are from a broader view and one of the goals is to enhance the comfort, safety, and mobility for residents and of the downtown. One of the outcomes of the work that was done with the NJ Future committees was that, and the goal for this team is to try to take that to the next step and identify some actionable improvements that can take those grand Master Plan goals and implement them, or at least start to. They will need to identify who is responsible for what and get things moving so that these types of improvements always take place and are a continual part of the community. One of the first things to come along was the priority to evaluate problematic intersections, and the discussion that came out of this was ways to do that which may be inexpensive, and to try to approach this in a way that is easy and simple. Ms. Bucci-Carter stated that one of the tools that came out of that was to demonstrate projects where you can try a temporary improvement that is in place for about a week and see if it works. She displayed some examples.

Ms. Brogan stated that another idea that came out was to survey the street furniture and bus stops. There are a lot of bus stops in the town, and some are busy and have no cover or seating. Whether a sheltered bus stop would fit is something to be evaluated, but there may be some spots where it would be helpful. Second, is to evaluate what we have in street furniture right now and then does it need to be replaced or is there a need for more. Age Friendly donated three benches to the Village last year, one is by Stop and Shop, and there is someone sitting on that bench on a regular basis. They want to evaluate where the good spots are and where people may need a rest. The other idea was to have planned expenditures on improving sidewalks. The idea is to put that into the Capital Budget each year and to phase in the sidewalk improvements that are happening. We need to have some tracking mechanism on the website to list improvements that have been done and are upcoming.

Ms. Bucci-Carter stated that the result of this effort is going to be implementation plans that are thoughtfully prepared. The advantage to all of the work that has been happening over the past few years, including the senior bus and improved sidewalks, are that elder residents are feeling more considered, and this is an effort to keep that going. She added that they welcomed the feedback of the Village Council.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that as much as this is age friendly, it is also just human friendly. Ms. Brogan stated that as they improve the community for the older citizens, they improve the walkability and safety, which makes a difference for the whole community for everyone. Councilwoman Knudsen agreed that the walkability came up in every age group. Mayor Hache added that it was beneficial from a general operating sense for the Village, it helps as a planning tool to stay on top of this. Councilman Sedon thanked everyone for their efforts as anything to make the downtown safer. Some work was already done with the tree wells, and there is a lot more work to be done which will provide canopy and shade to compliment the benches around town. Councilwoman Walsh stated that the benches were interesting because a lot of elderly people she knows can walk a distance and then they need a place to sit. They plan their route based on where they are going to be or end up so that they can get picked up at a bench or someplace where they can be seated.

Ms. Brogan stated that she didn’t know all the improvements that would happen on Franklin Avenue, but that may be a good spot to do a demonstration before it is actually built. Another area that comes up in conversation is the Broad Street, Ridgewood Avenue area. There might be opportunities to bring students in and do some design work. It is paint and it can be painted over if it doesn’t work, but it is just a thought as they move forward. Councilwoman Knudsen stated that Franklin is a County road, and they would have to go through the County to do anything, even if it is temporary. She loved the idea of students taking Ridgewood as a test project.

6. DISCUSSION

b. Ridgewood Water

1. Award Contract – Trolley Gate Repair at Wortendyke Facility

Ms. Mailander stated that the trolley gate at Wortendyke Facility in Midland Park is in disrepair and requires replacement. The Water Department went out for three quotes and are recommending the replacement by A.A.A., Inc./Anzalone Fence of South Hackensack in the amount of $20,012.00 which can be found in the Water Capital Budget.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that one of the other bidders stated that they are reusing the existing Doorking system, but on the other one they have the Doorking entry system as a replacement, and they integrated that into the price. The other bidder is saying that 1812 is incompatible. Ms. Mailander stated that she would get more information.

2. Water Utility Interest Rates for Delinquent Accounts

Ms. Mailander stated that these are annual resolutions which set the interest rates for delinquent accounts or for delinquent accounts similar to non-payment of taxes. It sets a 30-day grace period. Regarding the administrative fees, Ridgewood Water pays the Village of Ridgewood based on the total property tax indicated by the assessed value of the land, excluding the improvement. This is paid quarterly on the same due date as property taxes.

3. Water Administrative Maintenance Fees

c. Parking

1. West Ridgewood Avenue – 15-Minute Parking Spaces

Ms. Mailander stated that this ordinance codifies all four 15-minute parking spaces along East Ridgewood Avenue into the same section of the code. There was clarification on location, and the description of the 15-minute parking space along Van Neste Square. Mr. Rutishauser had also suggested replacing one 15-minute space on Library Place with a 3-hour space because it is closer to the kiosk, which is actually around the corner.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they were still missing two spaces. They should be adding all of those parking spaces on the south side of West Ridgewood Avenue, between Washington and Wilsey. There are four spaces, but this only refers to two. Ms. Mailander stated that she would get more information from Mr. Rutishauser.

2. Amend Time for General Parking in Lots

Ms. Mailander stated that this is a proposal to allow parking in all lots from 12:00 P.M. on without a permit. There would be a three-hour limit. The exceptions would be Cottage Place and the Train Station. The person would have to pay by Parkmobile or the kiosk, and they cannot park in the employee spaces on North Walnut. They are looking to free up the spots if there are any. Mayor Hache stated that this is a follow up to rolling back to 3:00 P.M. in a commuter spot, and subject to observation even up to noon there were still a lot of spaces that were unused.

Councilwoman Walsh asked if they would still have to have the resident permit. Ms. Mailander stated that they wouldn’t at that point, after noon. They would just have to pay the kiosk or through Parkmobile. Councilwoman Knudsen asked if there were any problems when they had changed the hours previously. Ms. Mailander stated that they didn’t have any problems.

d. Budget

1. Award Contract Under State Contract – Purchase of Fuel – Fleet Services Division

Ms. Mailander stated that this is awarded to Allied Oil Company of Hillsborough, not to exceed $370,000. This is in the 2020 operating budget for Fleet Services.

2. Award Contract Under State Contract – Purchase of Manholes and Catch Basin Frames and Grates – Street Services Division

Ms. Mailander stated that this award is to Campbell Foundry of Harrison, in an amount not to exceed $38,690.20. This is in the capital budget funds.

3. Permanent Lighting – Maple Park Field

Ms. Mailander stated that this was discussed and surrounding neighbors were notified. The proposal is to award the contract to Musco Sports Lighting of Farmingdale. It is under Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing, and funding is $145,000 from Village capital budget, $145,00 from Bergen County Open Space Grant, and $140,000 from the Ridgewood Youth Sports Groups. A bond ordinance would be introduced for the full amount and then the Village is reimbursed by the grant and the contribution from the sports groups.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked why they needed to bond for the whole amount. Ms. Mailander stated that they always do, whenever the Village gets a grant they have to do the whole amount and then get reimbursed. Councilwoman Knudsen stated that when they get a grant they have to make the purchase to get reimbursed, but asked why can’t they take the $140,000 from the youth sports group and then just bond the $300,000 and then make the purchase. Ms. Mailander stated that she would ask Mr. Rooney and the Bond Council. Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they shouldn’t add the debt if they didn’t have to.

Councilwoman Walsh asked how it was broken out across the Ridgewood Sports Groups. Ms. Mailander stated that she could find out. Councilwoman Knudsen added that it would be good to itemize it on the resolution.

4. Interest Rate for Delinquent Taxes

Ms. Mailander stated that these interest rate resolutions are annual resolutions that set the interest rates on the non-payment of these various liens, payments, or bills. It is the same interest rate as delinquent taxes, and sets grace periods for delinquent taxes with a 10-day grace period. With the other liens its 25 days, and for the sewer discharger fees it’s a 30-day grace period.

5. Interest Rate for Non-Payment of Other Municipal Liens

6. Interest Rate for Delinquent Significant Sewer Discharger Fees

7. Extend Sublease Agreement of 43-45 Hudson Street – Epic Management

Ms. Mailander stated that Epic is renting 43-45 Hudson Street, and this will expire at the end of April and an extension will have to be renewed until June. P&D Partners, the landlord, has agreed to the extension of the lease to the end of June 2020, and the resolution has to be done before it expires.

8. Bond Ords. – Schedler Fields and House

Ms. Mailander stated that one bond ordinance is for the improvements to Schedler Field, which was discussed when Mr. Rutishauser came in and discussed his budgets. The thought was to appropriate $1 million for that this year, which would be Phase I. He mentioned he would like to put in the parking lot, curbing, and if possible, some of the walking paths to get people to start using the park. The second is a bond ordinance providing for various improvements to Zabriskie-Schedler House in the amount of $865,500. Ms. Mailander stated that this is the final amount for that, and the Village will be applying for Historic Preservation Funding through Bergen County. In addition, Connolly and Hickey has recommending that they also apply for funding with the New Jersey Historic Preservation Trust. This is the full amount, as they don’t know what kind of grant they would get, but she is hopeful they can get grants from both of them, which would reduce this amount.

Mayor Hache asked if Millennium ever said that this project was coming up and there was a grant there, or was this solely from Connolly and Hickey. Ms. Mailander stated that it was solely from Connolly and Hickey, but as far as the Bergen County grant, that is something that the Village itself also applies for. Councilwoman Knudsen added that Friends of Schedler would also be applying for a grant. Ms. Mailander added that the amount would then be reduced by whatever grants came through.

e. Policy

1. Amend Single-Use Plastic Bag Ordinance

Ms. Mailander stated that as discussed, they have put together the things that both the Code Enforcement and Health Department requested. It indicates that any reusable bag has to indicate on it that it has a lifetime of 125 uses or the store must have available for inspection a written document from the distributor indicating that the bag has a lifetime minimum of 125 uses. The enforcement would be through the Village Health Department employees, Building Department employees, and/or any other Village employee so designated by the Village Manager. They can do this by investigating complaints or violations, completing unannounced inspections, or as part of regularly scheduled inspections by the registered environmental health specialist. This will address the concerns for those who enforce it, the fines are the same from originally, but this gives them the ability to enforce. It also allows the Village Manager to designate someone else to enforce it.

Councilwoman Walsh asked if it was 125 uses or 25 uses, as she had seen bags in stores that said 25 uses. Ms. Mailander stated that it was 125 uses. Councilwoman Knudsen asked Mr. Rogers what you can do by ordinance. Can you state that they can’t give the plastic bags to carry the groceries home, but she thought that if it was something for sale in the store they didn’t have the option to impose an ordinance dictating what could be sold. Mr. Rogers stated that was a different issue, as they are talking about whatever they are going to sell here to be able to be viably used to transport goods from a retail store. It doesn’t keep them from selling anything, it keeps them from selling a particular item that isn’t in conformance with this ordinance. Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they have the authority to say they can’t give the plastic bags, but do they have the jurisdiction or authority to condition their sales on these parameters. Mr. Rogers stated that they do have the ability to regulate for health and safety, and if they have to do with recycling they can put some parameters with regard to that.

Ms. Mailander stated that in the original ordinance that was adopted, it says 125 uses, as well. This new ordinance just incorporates it in a better way.

2. Update on Glenwood Road

Ms. Mailander stated that the Mayor gave the update on Glenwood Road previously in the meeting.

f. Operations – NONE

COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

Boyd Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that he had sent a note to some members of the Council regarding the Park and Ride as he learned that the Air Brook Limousine Service vacated the space, and the Avis Rental Car that was also at that location is gone. There is a tremendous amount of space that is available at that location, and it doesn’t seem that this has been discussed. He didn’t know if NJDOT notified the Village about this vacancy, and there also seems to be a number of spaces in the Village-managed portion of the lot. He asked if the Park and Ride was going to be increased in size, and would the NJDOT try to negotiate with Coach to begin more bus service from that area, or was there a private business that would take up that space. Mr. Loving added that there might be some opportunity for revenue generation if they let the Village manage the area.

There were no additional comments from the public, and Mayor Hache closed public comment.

Mayor Hache asked if there was an update on the Park and Ride. Ms. Mailander stated that they have not heard back from NJDOT yet, as this all happened recently, and it was recently that the Village boarded up the previous trailer that Air Brook was using. She agrees there are a lot of spaces available, and it may be possible that the Village could take up some of that space. Mr. Rogers stated that Mr. Rutishauser has been involved with NJDOT on a number of instances, and recently they were able to get Avis to leave that area. Avis is out of there now, and it is freeing everything up and now is a great time to deal with that issue.

7. RESOLUTION TO GO INTO CLOSED SESSION

Deputy Village Clerk Donna Jackson read Resolution #20-59 to go into Closed Session as follows:

8. ADJOURNMENT

There being no further business to come before the Village Council, on a motion by Councilman Sedon, seconded by Councilwoman Knudsen, and carried unanimously by voice vote, the Village Council’s Work Session was adjourned at 8:36 P.M.

 

 

______________________________
Ramon M. Hache, Sr.
Mayor

 

______________________________
Donna M. Jackson
Deputy Village Clerk

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A REGULAR WORK SESSION OF THE VILLAGE COUNCIL OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD HELD IN THE SYDNEY V. STOLDT, JR. COURTROOM OF THE RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE HALL, 131 NORTH MAPLE AVENUE, RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY ON OCTOBER 2, 2019 AT 7:30 P.M.

1. CALL TO ORDER – OPEN PUBLIC MEETINGS ACT – ROLL CALL – FLAG SALUTE

Mayor Hache called the meeting to order at 7:30 P.M. and read the Statement of Compliance with the Open Public Meetings Act. At roll call the following were present: Councilmembers Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache. Also present were Heather Mailander, Village Manager/Village Clerk; Matthew Rogers, Village Attorney; and Donna Jackson, Deputy Village Clerk. Councilwoman Knudsen was absent.

Mayor Hache led those in attendance in the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag as well as in a Moment of Silence to honor the brave men and women serving in our armed forces and all our first responders.

2. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

Russell Forenza, 228 Emmett Place, stated that he wanted to talk about the American flag on the flagpole, which should be the only flag on the flagpole outside including the prisoner of war flag. If another group wants to put up a flag they should get another pole and let them put their flag on that pole. The American flag is for all of the people who have died for this country, there is no flag that is equal or better than the American flag and no other flag deserves the honor to be on the same pole with the American flag. Mr. Forenza stated that there are fringe groups that want to do their thing, and let them do it, but on a different pole.

Mr. Forenza stated that the water still tastes bad. He added that the sewers and drywells need to be cleaned. Some don’t connect to the sewer line, and when the winter comes people are going to be sliding on the ice.

Mr. Forenza stated that he met the new tax collector this week and he thinks they did an excellent job with the hire as she seems to know a lot already which is a tremendous accomplishment. He thanked the Village Council and the Clerk for the hire as he thinks it is an excellent hire.

Tony Damiano, 274 South Broad Street, stated that he was there with colleagues from the Historic Preservation Commission, and added that he spoke last month about the business that painted their storefront orange. There is an ordinance in place regarding the use of bright color which shall be used only for accent. When he began with the HPC four years ago, he was never presented with the by-laws, a handbook, etc. They now have a handbook and it says to retain the established streetscape patterns to maintain the character of the Village center historic district. If the HPC does not favorably recommend your plan, the Building Department will not issue a permit for the work. Mr. Damiano stated that Councilwoman Knudsen wanted to rescind the ordinance and bring it to the Village Council. He stated that the Commission got very upset, and one of his colleagues said that she couldn’t do it as this ordinance was in place by HPC. He added that they took a vote and it was unanimous to keep this ordinance in place, and although she and Melanie Hoban were in favor of this, it clearly does not fit in with the streetscape.

Mr. Damiano stated that they have a predicament now and they are looking to the Village Council to recommend what to do about this. He asked if they weren’t going to follow ordinances, why they would have them in place. The HPC is trying to keep with the character of Ridgewood, and these buildings on Ridgewood Avenue are Tudors, Victorians, etc., and orange is not an historic color. They are looking to the Village Council for some guidance, and added that the business did use their old sign which the HPC did not approve.

Nancy Hill, 136 Doremus Avenue, stated that she wanted to say a few words about shade trees. She added that there are still people in Ridgewood who think that there is a shade tree department and if a tree goes down, a tree gets planted. She stated that this isn’t true, and hasn’t been true for decades. She estimated about 4,000 missing trees which is going to make for a very unpleasant Ridgewood life they don’t do something about it quickly.

Ms. Hill stated that she went to a Visioning Workshop a week ago, and there was an item on the checklist that says maintain the canopy and the trees, and in the group that she went to, four groups said that they valued the canopy highly. She added that there is a lot of support for these trees. She stated that they need these trees, the money, and a permanent shade tree department, and the only way that they are going to get it is if there is a line item for a department and the trees.

Neil Sullivan, 335 East Ridgewood Avenue, stated that he thinks when it comes to the flag; the American flag flies for every American and covers everybody. Once you deviate and get into other areas, you get into the First Amendment. He added that flags can cause division in a community and, so, he would think that if you continue with the agenda of having anybody fly a flag, who determines who flies a flag. He suggested going with the flag that flies the highest and covers everybody.

Hans Lehman, 234 Union Street, stated that the Village Council seems to pride itself on communication with its residents, but asked how do you get a Councilmember to reply to your emails, seven in this case, with no response.

Russell Forenza, 228 Emmett Place, stated that he moved here in 1951 and Ridgewood had a gun range in Glen Rock and at one time had a competition there amongst other towns. He added that it was there before and it was operational, and the surrounding communities all participated in the competition.

There were no additional comments from the public, and Mayor Hache closed public comments.

3. MANAGERS REPORT

Ridgewood Fire Department Open House – Ms. Mailander stated that the Ridgewood Fire Department Open House is this Sunday, October 6th from 1:30 P.M. to 3:30 P.M. The events are fire extinguisher training and demonstration, engine ladder and rescue demonstration, and refreshments will be served.

Village Council Meetings – Ms. Mailander stated that the upcoming Village Council meetings will take place on the following dates: October 7th Public Meeting at 8:00 P.M. – this is a Monday due to Yom Kippur on Wednesday, October 9th; October 23rd Work Session at 7:30 P.M, and November 6th Work Session at 7:30 P.M.

Ridgewood Chamber of Commerce Sidewalk Sales – Ms. Mailander stated that the Ridgewood Chamber of Commerce will host their biggest Sidewalk Sale ever October 3rd through 5th.

Bergen County Utilities Authority – Ms. Mailander stated that the Bergen County Utilities Authority sponsors free recycling events throughout the year. The next recycling and shredding event will be this Sunday, October 6th at Campgaw Reservation in Mahwah. Household hazardous waste collection will take place on Sunday, October 20th from 9:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. at Bergen Community College in Paramus. Details at www.bcua.org.

Ridgewood Farmers Market – Ms. Mailander stated that the Ridgewood Farmers Market, sponsored by the Ridgewood Chamber of Commerce has extended the date to which they will continue to operate. They will run until November 24th from 9:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. at the Ridgewood Train Station.

Deadline for Voter Registration – Ms. Mailander stated that the deadline for voter registration for the November General Election is October 15th. Anyone who is not yet registered to vote or has moved with or into Ridgewood since the last election should register or re-register to vote. Voter registration will take place on October 15th from 8:30 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. in the Village Clerk’s Office and then from 4:30 P.M. to 9:00 P.M. in the Ridgewood Public Library lobby.

4. COUNCIL REPORTS

Community Center Advisory Board – Councilman Voigt stated that they met last Thursday. Today there was a bus tour for seniors to get them engaged with the new bus. The theme was Ridgewood Parks tour with Nancy Bigos as the tour guide. Friday, October 4th there will be a 6th grade mixer from 7:30 P.M. to 9:00 P.M. in the Annie Zusy Center. It includes pizza, cookies, and a DJ.

There is a 7th and 8th grade mixer featuring Flavian the mind reader on November 4th from 7:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M. in the Annie Zusy Center. They are seeking to pad the poles in the center with carpeting so people don’t get hurt by banging themselves into the poles and it will cost approximately $1,100.

Age Friendly Ridgewood – Councilman Voigt stated that Age Friendly Ridgewood is likely to gain an additional grant from the Taub Foundation based on their interaction with the Village and the Village Council demonstrating a desire to work with them and with elders.

ACCESS – October 11th and 12th is ACCESS Weekend for families at the Ridgewood Library in conjunction with the Community Center Advisory Board.

There is a senior workshop, “Protecting your body and brain” on Friday, October 11th. Ridgewood Parks and Recreation and Shira Altman will be presenting at the Annie Zusy Center. Crafts, Jester Jim, a family concert, live music, and a fashion show, will take place throughout the weekend.

Ridgewood High School – Councilman Voigt stated that there is the 100th birthday of Ridgewood High School on Saturday, October 19th from 11:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M.

Chamber of Commerce – Councilwoman Walsh stated that Ms. Mailander mentioned the Sidewalk Sale.

Library Board – Councilwoman Walsh stated that the Library Board meeting was last Tuesday and there was conversation regarding the application that the Library is hoping to put in for renovations. There was public comment asking how the structure would work and it is fluid at this point, but the idea would be to make the application and hope to have donated funds, Village funds, and then the grant that would come back. That is still a work in progress.

Green Ridgewood – Councilman Sedon stated that tomorrow, from 4:00 P.M. to 4:45 P.M. he will be hosting an event in the Library called “Our Planet” for children ages 4 to 7. Registration is full, and they will go through a few select songs and stop in between to talk about the dos and don’ts of things you can recycle in Ridgewood, where our water comes from, and an arts and crafts session. He thanked Ashley Loria, at the Library and Bob Upton, Chair of Green Ridgewood, for working with him to put the program together.

Ridgewood Arts Council – Mayor Hache announced in Councilwoman Knudsen’s absence that the Ridgewood Arts Council met last night and is working on organizing the second annual Holiday Display Contest. Interested businesses should email Councilwoman Knudsen or rac@ridgewoodnj.net.

Visioning Workshop – Mayor Hache announced in Councilwoman Knudsen’s absence that Saturday’s Visioning Workshop was a great success and she was grateful for all who attended as they move into the next phase of the Master Plan process. She has been asked about the feasibility of adding another date for the workshop and is looking into the feasibility of doing so.

Mayor Hache stated that Councilwoman Knudsen was absent this evening because she was attending the 200 Club Dinner and Awards Ceremony where Ridgewood Police Sergeant Kyle Finch and Ridgewood Police Officer Jack Knudsen are receiving Meritorious Service Awards under Dangerous Circumstances. He thanked all of our public safety professionals, adding that they are grateful for their service to our community.

Mayor Hache added that a lot of interesting things came out of the Visioning Workshop this past weekend, there was good participation from members of the community, NV5, and it was very interesting. The two things that came out most prominently was the importance of the tree canopy, and our age friendliness as a community. He added that they are going to start looking at some proposals to start the projects of replacing and rehabbing the tree wells in the downtown. The removal of those bands will be the first part, and they are waiting to hear back what the cost will be. The second step will be to level out the soil and stabilize that and then rehab the tree well, and the last step is planting new, healthy trees.

Gold Star Mothers Ceremony – Mayor Hache stated that last Sunday, they had the Gold Star Mothers Ceremony, and he thanked Bob Paoli from American Legion Post 53, Maria Bombace, Boy Scouts Troop 5, and the RHS students from Project Interact. He thanked Ms. Mailander, Councilwoman Walsh, and Councilman Voigt for being there, as well.

Grand Opening – This Friday, October 4th at 5:30 P.M. there is a grand opening for Stretch Recovery Lounge at 29 Godwin Avenue. Saturday, October 5th at 12:00 P.M. Café De Royal is opening as well.

5. PRESENTATIONS

a. Lead and Copper

Rich Calbi, Director of Ridgewood Water, and Dan Timmeny, Business Manager for Ridgewood Water were presenting on lead and copper. Mr. Timmeny stated that they were there to talk about lead in our drinking water. They have observed successes regarding lead in our drinking water. The USEPA and Ridgewood Water are very concerned about lead in the water, and the action level for lead is set at 15 parts per billion. There has been some talk about reducing that longer term. The action level for copper is 1.3 parts per million. Under Federal law, they are required to have a program in place to minimize lead in drinking water. Ridgewood Water fully implemented the use of corrosion control polyorthophospate in May of 2016.

Mr. Timmeny stated that the EPA wishes all utilities talk about the health effects of lead. Lead can cause serious problems if too much of it enters your body over time. It can damage the brain and kidneys; it can also damage the production of oxygen carrying red blood cells. The greatest risks are to infants, young children, and pregnant women. Lead poisoning has been linked with lower IQs in children. Adults with kidney problems or high blood pressure can also be affected by lower levels of lead than healthy adults. Fetuses receive lead from their mother’s bones which can have adverse effects on brain development in utero, as well.

Mr. Timmeny stated that lead is a common metal that is found in the environment. Drinking water is one potential source, but the main sources are lead based paint or lead contaminated dust or soil. Most often, it can also be found in pottery, pewter, brass fixtures, cosmetics, and some foods and spices. Exposure can also occur from hobbies such as shooting ranges or fishing, and as a reminder lead is not intrinsic to the water supply. Mr. Timmeny stated that the EPA estimates that between ten and twenty percent of a person’s potential exposure to lead can come from drinking water. Infants who consume mostly formula with lead containing water can received between 40 and 60% of their exposure to lead if they were consuming water with higher levels of lead.

Mr. Timmeny stated that prior to January 2014, lead-free allowed up to 8% of leaded plumbing products. That has since changed and now end-use fixtures that are labeled as lead-free can contain no more that .25%. They always recommend that people test the water in their home. He stated that lead primarily enters the drinking water supply through the corrosion of materials that contain lead in the water distribution system, but also mainly from household plumbing including solder, fittings, valves, and pipes made with lead. Homes and buildings in New Jersey built before 1988 are much more likely to have lead pipes or lead solder in their homes. Service lines can also contain lead.

Mr. Timmeny displayed a diagram that laid out the structure of how someone’s service line connects to the actual water main in the street and where it comes from. The main point to convey is that internal household plumbing tends to be the predominant source of where lead is coming from. Their corrosion control treatment is a polyorthophospate additive that is food grade, and added to the water supply. Phosphates inhibit the transfer of lead from those plumbing materials and it binds the lead that the water might pass through and prevents it from leaching into the water. This is approved by NJDEP and USEPA. As a reminder, Mr. Timmeny stated that they have undertaken significant testing, and when they talk about acquiring additional water from other sources they are constantly testing that water supply.

Mr. Timmeny stated that materials in contact and stagnation are two conditions, that when eliminated will stop the corrosion of lead into the water. You can replace the materials in the home or create a barrier between the water and the material, which is what the phosphate does. Ridgewood Water also tells people to flush the water that has been sitting overnight, let it run for a second, and you will see a reduction if there is anything there.

The Ridgewood Water testing results show a trend since 2003 at 7.7 parts per billion, climbing to 21.6 which was a lead exceedance and put Ridgewood Water on an action plan in 2012. There was a straight line reduction thereafter, and the most recent round of testing two weeks ago was 1.9 parts per billion. Ridgewood Water has never had any issues with copper, and the most recent testing was 0.15 parts per million. Mr. Timmeny displayed a chart showing the action level, which shows that the phosphate is working for sure.

Mr. Timmeny stated that there are discounted water test kits at Village Hall, and they have contracted with a reputable lab which is $50 for a test kit. As a courtesy, if someone wants and it is inconvenient to get to Village Hall, they are taking names and addresses. So, if the meter techs are out in a nearby area they will drop the kits off. The lab picks up the sample directly and will provide the resident and Ridgewood Water with the results, as well. If you have any questions about your piping, you can contact the distribution division, and you can consult with an expert to review the pipes and fixtures in your home.

Councilwoman Walsh asked about the two years that the lead spiked, and if Mr. Timmeny had any analysis why it spiked and afterwards were there any lines changed that would have reduced it. Mr. Calbi stated that they have no definitive conclusions, but they could tell from documents regarding prior operations, that there were treatment changes made in the system that resulted in changes in pH, which is one of the very important factors of maintaining optimum corrosion control in the system. The altered pH then created further corrosion in the system.

Councilman Voigt asked how long you should flush the water in your house. Mr. Timmeny stated that at least a minute is the recommendation, longer if you can leave the room and let it run while you do something else. Councilman Voigt asked about the phosphate creating a barrier between the lead pipe and the water, and if it coats the pipe. Mr. Timmeny stated that was correct. Councilman Voigt asked if someone finds that lead tested high in their house, how they determine the source. It may create a situation where you have to replace all of the pipes. Mr. Calbi stated that they will go out and try to pinpoint where in the home the problem could be. They take a sample at the point of the meter, kitchen sink, bathroom sink, and try to determine if it is a problem from the service line or if it is located in the home. They will then try to isolate it to a location for the resident.

Mayor Hache commended Mr. Calbi for his leadership, and looking at the amount of resources and the outreach of the community. This educational material is helpful as there is a lot of misinformation out there, so he appreciated them already being in front of these things. He asked if additives like phosphate would have an impact on the taste of the water. Mr. Calbi stated that not necessarily, the phosphate by itself will not create a taste problem, but it will create more of a chlorine smell or taste as a result of contact with the chlorination that they do. A lot of the complaints they receive are about the smell and taste as a result of that disinfectant. Mayor Hache stated that they have to comply, so the smell and taste are actually proof of compliance. Mr. Calbi stated that the level of compliance today has quadrupled in the last decade and as a result they have to do more disinfection. Mayor Hache asked if the temperature of the water was also a factor in the lead presence, in addition to running the water for a minute. Mr. Calbi stated that hot water tends to leach it out. Mr. Timmeny added that you should run the cold water at that point as well just to make sure you get it out.

Councilman Sedon commended them for the work that they have done for Ridgewood Water, and for this presentation, as some of the publications that go out make it seem scary, but the presentation did a good job of putting it in perspective. Mayor Hache asked if the presentation would be available on the Ridgewood Water website. Mr. Timmeny stated that they could arrange that. Mayor Hache stated that the water forums with the League of Women Voters that they did last year were great and suggested that perhaps they do something similar this year.

b. WaterSmart

Mr. Calbi stated that about a year and a half ago, Ridgewood Water posed a recommendation to award a contract for software called WaterSmart. Since then they have been going back and forth in ideas with respect to that, the benefits and the cons. They feel that at that time when they brought it to the Village Council they may have asked for too much, but they have seen the value to the program over the past year and a half.

Mr. Timmeny stated that since they last talked about WaterSmart, they have been through two summers which will be one of the driving points of this discussion. In that time, they heard from customers that they wish they had a tool to identify leaks at their residences, and also how a specific volume of water is being used. While Ridgewood Water reads the entire system monthly, they bill quarterly. That makes a big difference when it comes to leak detection. He added that they looked at monthly billing in the past, which is cost prohibitive. Customers also lead them to believe that quarterly billing is sufficient. Mr. Timmeny added that they are confident in the quarterly billing but need a way to get the data they are already capturing out to their customers at a more frequent interval.

Mr. Timmeny stated that they have between 20 and 30 leaks a year, and will hear two to three times that amount from people who said they had a leak and fixed it. The AWWA best practice indicates that every home will have a toilet leak every five years. What that actually means is they will directly read from the meter how many gallons are passing through the meter per minute. It can be anywhere between 1 and 5 gallons a minute, 4 and 5 is fairly unusual. Looking at gallons per minute, and at 2 gallons per minute, times 60 minutes in the hour, you are looking at 2,880 gallons of water used. That is just a single toilet. Mr. Timmeny stated on a monthly level, at that same two gallons a minute, it will be 86,000 gallons and the quarterly total is 259,000 gallons. The total cost of that leak to a customer per quarter is $1,251.94. He pointed out that this is a significant amount of money for a customer to have to pay simply because they have no idea what’s happening in their home in that interval between billing periods.

Mr. Timmeny stated that they are often called out to do what is called a data logger. Someone will say they presume they have leak, and if it isn’t a sprinkler it is something internal in the home and they would be checking toilets. Data loggers let them log into the meter itself and see the hourly history of water use in your home for 90 days looking back. When you see a toilet running it tends to stand out as a large jump. In 2017, they did 40 data loggers. In 2018 there were 45, and this year they have already done 31. Mr. Timmeny stated that they like going out to do this, but it is pro bono as they are not completing any repairs or work. So, it is a cost to the utility. That cost overall would range anywhere between $6,000 to $10,000 per year, just in terms of human capital, use of vehicles, fringe benefit capture, and the like.

Mr. Timmeny stated that that they did a data logger for a residential leak in Glen Rock. The person’s consumption bill on May 6th was 28,000 gallons, and their August consumption was 313,000 gallons. The first month immediately following that 28,000 gallon read was 114,000 gallons. If that person had that information available to them, they could have called Ridgewood Water or self-diagnosed the problem. The bill for that person was $1,500 in wasted water. Mr. Timmeny stated that there are more than 20,000 accounts, and this is not a crazy amount of water. WaterSmart would allow users to set thresholds and go back and diagnose. These are resources that we don’t presently have as a utility.

Mr. Timmeny stated that a restaurant in Ridgewood used 1.2 million gallons in a single quarter. They did a data logger and were floored by the amount of water that was flying through that building. They have since made repairs, but it is not fully repaired, and on the absolute high end they may be using 400,000 gallons in a quarter. Their bill was $5,500. Had they caught that between the time of the read and that first month they would have saved them over $3,600. Mr. Timmeny stated that was a series of different things, including an ice maker line, the way they were cooling cases, and the running toilet. This is another place where WaterSmart, or a tool like it, would be really helpful and beneficial to residents and commercial customers.

Mr. Timmeny stated that their customers want to have this information available to them. They want it easily accessible. He stated that they had previously come before the Village Council and requested a full suite of services with water reports, mailings to the home, portal, messaging client, and leak notifications. For Ridgewood Water, the most important thing is the portal, integrating with payment methods, and making sure that people have all of that data available to them. If payment is embedded in the portal, WaterSmart indicates that 40-50% of customers are actually engaged with their portal tool. If it was a smart metering system, the uptake is in the mid-20s, and if you are the older legacy west coast utilities, you are looking at 10% of customer engagement. Mr. Timmeny stated that the current billing contract does integrate with WaterSmart, so they would shoot to be in that 40-50% engagement range within 12 months.

Mr. Timmeny stated that WaterSmart is now in Paulsboro, and North Brunswick. They have also recently implemented in Yonkers. There are about 1,500 commercial accounts in the system and about 19,000 residential. There are two streams of water savings from a percentage basis, 3-5% of water use per capita per day are water utility efficiency, and better consumer leak detection. Leak Detection is not the kind of thing that you will find and then never again. The AWWA says that a flapper in the toilet will fail every five years, so you never know when this might affect you. Another benefit is cash flow, as customers pay about 16 days faster through a portal.

Mr. Timmeny stated that they have spent the time collecting data, and would like to talk about the software portal itself, the messaging client, and the leak detection technology which isn’t actually reliant on someone signing up for the system. Going forward, they received a quote of year one pricing at $73,000 which includes API fees and licenses. Year two is $44,000. The last time they were here, each water report that went out to customers was about ninety cents each. They are willing to forgo that entirely just to have the software portal and the tools themselves. Mr. Timmeny stated that it would enhance their operations and offer something to the customer that they are looking for and expect from their utilities.

Councilman Voigt stated that they have about 15 leaks, about $19,000 times four so that’s about $81,000 in savings, and it’s going to cost about $73,000 for the system so it sounds like Ridgewood Water would make money on this in the end. Mr. Timmeny stated that they are certain they will find that more people will notice the leaks in their homes, and right now they know that number is entirely underreported. He added that they don’t know if something has changed, and they won’t know unless they go to the house but can give people that self-service tool. Councilman Voigt stated that they didn’t talk about the commercial side in terms of leaks. Mr. Timmeny stated that the majority of what is reported is toilet leaks on the residential side. Off the top of his head, there is a restaurant in Wyckoff that had a toilet running in a back room for almost two years and they did not know that bill should be any different.

Councilwoman Walsh asked what the dollar amount was last time for the program. Mr. Timmeny stated that they asked for year one costs at $157,840 and then year two costs were $38,000. Councilwoman Walsh asked if the difference from the last time they presented is just due to the reporting. Mr. Timmeny stated that they were asking for four water reports a year that totaled $75.600. Councilwoman Walsh asked how many water reports they were asking for now. Mr. Timmeny stated that they were asking for zero, as they will just engage strictly on the portal itself as an electronic tool that is mobile enabled.

Councilwoman Walsh asked if there were no three year or four year costs. Mr. Timmeny stated that was correct, but they would need to go out to bid to see how that would shake out. API fees are subject to a small increase of 2-3%, so year three would be $48,500. Councilwoman Walsh asked if at that point it would end or would it continue each year. Mr. Timmeny stated that 2-3% was the presumed increase per year. Councilwoman Walsh stated that then there would be charges each additional year. Mr. Timmeny stated that was correct, as the majority of that comes from a subscription fee per account. Councilwoman Walsh asked how much they would save per year. Mr. Timmeny cited the numbers that Councilman Voigt calculated.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that he had talked about customers, and the volume, and asked what the manpower reduction would be. Mr. Timmeny stated that right now this is something that they do not do. The data loggers they would save on the amount of times that they have to go out to a home, but right now they are not combing through the data set to identify leaks. Councilwoman Walsh asked if the 20 to 30 leaks a year were self-reporting, and then what happens. Mr. Timmeny stated that from a utility perspective, they will go out and try to isolate the leak, or the resident may fix the leak themselves. He believes that number is exponentially higher than what is reported. So, giving people that information will cut down on some calls. Every time they go out to look at a leak people ask why there is no tool to tell them that something has happened.

Councilwoman Walsh asked Mr. Timmeny what that cost would be to bill on a monthly basis for the customer to be notified. Mr. Timmeny stated that he would get that exact number, but it was severely cost prohibitive to them. Councilwoman Walsh stated that she set a threshold to her water to $300, so she would get notified when there was a bill that was higher and they should just do that. Mr. Timmeny stated that the cost would be exponentially higher to do that. Councilwoman Walsh asked if they looked into the current billing system and changing that, shouldn’t that be a real easy data point for a company to get and shouldn’t cost that much as it is literally the same data.

Councilwoman Walsh asked for further clarification with regards to how they are engaged. Mr. Timmeny stated that we do not currently have a smart metering system, but if they did, it would be getting data much more frequently. That is a cost that a lot of utilities have decided to embark on, and it is something that is down the road. As a result, their analytics and the uptake of the system is that if people don’t have embedded payments and just use the portal as an information dashboard, your engagement is in the mid 20’s. They would expect that it would be lower than that for Ridgewood Water because they are only providing data once a month.

Ms. Mailander stated that they needed a decision at this time. Councilman Voigt asked how quickly they could get out of the contract if they weren’t happy with it. Mr. Calbi stated that any service like this is a two year maximum contract, awarded annually. Councilman Voigt asked if they would have to do two years. Mr. Calbi stated that you could get out of it after the first year. Mr. Rogers stated that depending on how the contract is written, and performance, there may be exits during the contract process. Councilman Voigt stated that this seems to be a lot more palatable and is in favor because they are going to be saving money.

Councilman Sedon stated that he was in favor of it last time and this time sounds even better. It is a great conservation tool and like Mr. Timmeny mentioned, maybe they won’t get it out as quickly without the water reports, it might just get out there through word of mouth. Mayor Hache stated that the figures of water loss are staggering. That is water that is wasted and especially in the summer months when we are buying water from other utilities to make up the shortfall. So, he thinks it is a wise investment. Councilwoman Walsh stated that if she could get that other information, and we have current systems and she would think that these should be hand in hand.

c. PFAS Treatment Demonstration

Mr. Calbi stated that he was talking about the current polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and a resin treatment demonstration project that they are kicking off in the utility. They are talking about PFAS compounds that are emerging contaminants in our water. In particular, they are looking at the compounds of PFOA, PFOS, and PFNA. There are thousands of PFAS compounds, but the three listed are the ones most prevalent in our area and are about to be regulated by the NJDEP. These are man-made chemicals used for firefighting. They are in carpet, clothing, fabrics, furniture, packaging for food and other materials. They are resistant to water, grease, stains, and have been titled the forever contaminant because they do not break down. Mr. Calbi stated that as a result of the use of these contaminants for about the past 70 years, they have made their way through our waste stream and unfortunately into our groundwater.

Mr. Calbi stated that about this time last year, Ridgewood Water, the Village Council, and Ms. Mailander sat in on a really robust educational program about PFAS because they knew it was in our water and they needed to react and let the public know and come up with an action plan. He stated that one of their main goals in the action plan was shutting down the Carr Treatment plant and installing treatment. The Carr Treatment Plant had one of the highest levels of PFAS in the source water, and they shut it down in 2017. They designed and went out to bid on a treatment system, which is now complete and it went back online last week and is running a million gallons a day. It is now running water with non-detect levels of PFAS into the system.

Mr. Calbi stated that their second goal was to evaluate alternative methods for treatment because the GAC that they put at Carr was very expensive and the granulated activated carbon only lasts a certain amount of time and then has to be replaced. Their other goal was to monitor and assess the plants based on those levels in terms of where they should target treatment next in the system. Other goals were to follow the source to determine the source of this contaminant. Earlier this year they filed a lawsuit, and they communicated with wholesale providers to ask what they are doing for treatment. Passaic Valley Water Commission does not have this problem at the moment. They continue to report this information to the public and will present this information to the public this fall with one rather large presentation in Midland Park, and all will be invited to that.

Mr. Calbi stated that they are going to talk about ion exchange using synthetic resin. The goal is to demonstrate the capabilities of this technology for removing PFAS from the groundwater so they can determine sizing and cost. They are doing a resin demonstration program at the Prospect Treatment Plant in Glen Rock. They are considering resin because it has a much larger surface area than traditionally activated carbon, thereby it requires a small vessel reducing the cost, and it has an extended life. It has been found to last as much as three years. They are doing a cost evaluation as well to determine what is best for us.

Mr. Calbi stated that the project is a joint effort with a company ECT2 who have provided test kits for Ridgewood Water to do the testing. Ridgewood Water installed the system with them and is doing the analysis on a monthly basis. It will then be shared with ECT2 who will then generate a report which they will both use to analyze the cost effectiveness of this technology. He showed what the device looks like, adding that they are currently testing two different types of resins. Mr. Calbi added that there is not a single utility in New Jersey that is using resins. In Pennsylvania they have been using this for years, so they are taking this approach proactively in hopes of securing better technology and saving money over time.

Mr. Calbi stated that current results from the August sampling show that the influent concentrations, PFOA standards that are proposed are 15 and PFOS standards are 14. The PFOA is in exceedance and the PFOS is very close. On the treatment endpoint, they are at non-detect, so the resin is working. Based on the results they are getting, they expect it may take a year or more to see some breakthrough, at which point they might stop to do some analysis to find the life expectancy of the resin.

Councilman Voigt asked what that would cost if they continue with the activated carbon and implement that through the whole system. The project at Carr cost $3.5 million in capital costs, and he didn’t have the firm number on operation and maintenance costs but there will be an annual O&M cost. Councilman Voigt stated that if the utility uses 8 to 12 million gallons a day, they have to ramp up the processing of this, so if its $3 million, 8 times that is $25-$30 million. Mr. Calbi stated that was before interest. Councilman Voigt asked about the resin and if there was an idea of how much less expensive that would be. Mr. Calbi stated that the carbon is more expensive than the resin, but it does have a longer life and it can function in a smaller vessel. With the Carr project they had the designer retrofit the system ahead of time so that if they ever decide to go to resin, they are set up for it. Their hope is that they could pump water from other facilities at some point and go from 1 million gallons per day to 2 million gallons per day, saving that infrastructure cost.

Councilman Voigt asked if this would be in our water forever. Mr. Calbi stated that it is a forever contaminant, but at some point if you pump and treat it you could eliminate it from the plume. These chemicals are outlawed, and there was an agreement between the companies and the federal government to stop production, but a lot of these companies change a chain on the molecule and sell it. At the Carr plant, they test for 14 compounds, and found that all 14 are non-detectable at the moment.

Councilman Sedon stated that there was some discussion about the Twinney plant, and there is a cylinder there and would this resin work there. Mr. Calbi stated that they have engaged an engineering firm and they are evaluating both resin and carbon to see which one should go there and to reactivate those vessels. Councilman Sedon asked if this was something that they were considering for the property on Goffle Road. Mr. Calbi stated that was up for the Village Council’s approval tonight, as the Ravine property had to put pumps back in the well. They got test results back and were able to get proposals from consultants. They are going to evaluate treatment alternatives for this site.

Mayor Hache stated that they talked about the challenges with the granulated activated carbon, as once it is used up it is a complicated process. He asked if the cost was also considering the cost of disposal of the chemical. Mr. Calbi stated that was an important point as the carbon can be regenerated, and the resin cannot be regenerated and has to go to a landfill. Mayor Hache stated that he thought there should be an environmental consideration, as well. Mr. Calbi stated that it would have to go deep into a protected canyon.

d. Plastic Bag Ban

Councilman Sedon stated that Justin Manger is the Chair of the Ridgewood Green Team and Bob Upton is the Chair of Green Ridgewood, and they were going to talk about a website that will be a very helpful tool for them to get out the information about the plastic bag ban. The idea is to put Dylan Hansen on as an administrator as well just in case they need to do any updates in the future.

Mr. Upton thanked the Village Council for passing the plastic bag ban, and for implementing the name change that was requested taking REAC to Green Ridgewood. They are focused on the education campaign for the plastic bag ordinance, targeted businesses and residents. Logically, since this is the first program that they are undertaking as Green Ridgewood, this also serves as their introduction to the community under the new name and they are looking to promote the name at Earth Day, as well as throughout the year.

Mr. Upton stated that the plastic bag education is the launch of their Green Ridgewood identity, so they will be doing an education program and asked the Village to take advantage of any opportunities to publicize the plastic bag ordinance. They also provided information to the Chamber of Commerce and the Ridgewood Guild to notify businesses. While they are still developing the education campaign, they are in the process of purchasing reusable shopping bags to use as a promotional item, and rather than creating literature, they are just going to produce something along the lines of a bookmark that can be handed out to people with information telling them where to go to get more information. Those would introduce Green Ridgewood with the name and a new logo which is the same as the REAC logo, but just changing the wording on it.

Mr. Upton stated that they would want to promote the activities, both the plastic bag education and the other activities of Green Ridgewood through a website, Facebook, and social media. They have found it difficult to work with the Village website because they have to request what can go on there, so they feel the need to create their own website that they can manage and control. This will become central to the educational campaign and anything that they decide to do in the future.

Mr. Manger displayed the website, GreenRidgewoodNJ.org and stated that they are looking to take the burden off the Village IT Department, and delegate some of those duties to themselves. He stated that they could add Dylan as an administrator if he wanted to be on the site. He added that the website was a big part of the new rebranding, as it is customizable and made for mobile. Mr. Manger stated that Earth Day is coming up and the theme is Green Ridgewood, so this is a perfect opportunity to highlight the rebranding and use the website to recruit volunteers. He walked the Village Council through the beta of the website and showed them various options and places for personalization and customization. He added that the page is currently live, but they haven’t announced it. It is currently hosted on Weebly and the cost is $150 annually, and there is money in the Green Ridgewood budget to pay for this. He added that there was also a “contact us” page.

Mr. Upton added that one thing they would request is to have a link from the Village website to this page so that people can find them easily. Mayor Hache asked if the idea was to have it on Boards and Committees and then a link to click. Mr. Manger was in agreement.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that she thinks this is great, as George Wolfson and Ellie Gruber tried for years to get the website back, but they couldn’t get the person to relinquish access to the website that had been the REAC website. She asked Mr. Rogers about another group that wanted to do a personal website that was similar to this, but there was a question about content that would be supported by the Village. How does that work if it is a Village committee and this is a private website. Mr. Rogers stated that it is a standing committee that they have dealt with throughout the year, and maybe there should be some additional wording to distance it from that standpoint even though it might be on the Village website. They appoint its members, so they may have to work on some wording to make sure there is a distance there that shows that this website that is being run independently and the Village assists in just those items.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that if Mr. Hansen should have access to this, as well, because you never know when somebody could go rogue and post something. Councilman Sedon was in agreement. Mr. Rogers stated that it was something that the Village Council would have to weigh in on regarding the benefits that come out of doing it this way. He highlighted possible detriments as well, adding that you have to take those extra steps to make sure that you’re covered and properly engage the right technique and the right wording. Mr. Manger stated that they were happy to work with someone to get the legal wording down. Councilwoman Walsh stated that she didn’t know how you could go rogue with sustainability, but understands if this was going to be a model for others to come. Mr. Rogers stated that it would be a committee by committee basis and the oversight is going to be the key.

Mr. Upton stated that Councilman Sedon is fully informed on what is going on at all meetings, and he reviews the minutes from the meetings before they are sent to Mr. Hansen to go on the Village website. Councilwoman Walsh stated that it is public information, and would still have to be housed on the Village website, but it could be on both locations. Mr. Rogers stated that in the future they might not have someone who is as involved or as attentive as Councilman Sedon is. Mr. Upton stated that they want to order promotional items and put the website on them, and he hoped they were comfortable with him doing that. Ms. Mailander stated that she wanted to run it by Mr. Hansen to make sure there were no problems, as her one concern is that it says “contact us,” and they way that they respond may not be the way that the Village would respond and she didn’t know how that would be reconciled. She added that Mr. Rogers can come up with wording for them, as well.

Mr. Manger stated that they could help promote Village things such as the water program. As long as it has a sustainability issue, they could help get the word out. Mayor Hache stated that some guidance from Mr. Rogers regarding language and also to distribute a social media policy to Boards and Committees, as well. He added that this is a tremendous group of volunteers. Ms. Mailander asked that they wait to hear back from her before ordering anything. Mr. Upton stated that the email address that people would contact them through is already on the Village website. Mr. Manger added that they could take down the “contact us” page, as well, if that was something that the Village Manager wanted.

6. DISCUSSION

a. Ridgewood Water

1. Award Professional Services Contract – Feasibility Study to Reactivate Ravine Well

Ms. Mailander stated that at the Ravine Well, they want to explore the option of pumping the yield from the Marr Test Well to that Ravine Treatment Facility. They did purchase the house at 451 Goffle Road right by the Ravine Well and that was to facilitate the installation of treatment for the Ravine Well and/or the Marr Well. Mott MacDonald, who was the low proposal, will evaluate the feasibility, develop concepts for the activation of the wells, and also the installation of the treatment options. There were three proposals, and Mott MacDonald of Iselin was the low amount at $27,400. The funding is in the Ridgewood Water Capital Budget.

2. Award Contract under State Contract – Fiber Network Collection and Build

Ms. Mailander stated that this is under State Contract to get information about a fiber network and putting it all together so that it can be tracked through our new ESRI system by block and lot. It would also track assets for the water system so they understand where everything is located. This State Contract would go to Civil Solutions of Hammonton in an amount not to exceed $39,260 and this is out of the Water Operating Budget.

3. Award Sourcewell Co-Op Purchasing Contract – 2020 Ford F250 Pickup – Metering Division

Ms. Mailander stated that this is a truck for the Metering Division. This would be in an amount not to exceed $45,743. It is a 2020 Ford Super Duty F250 XL 4WD. It is in the Water Capital Account. Currently the vehicles used by the Metering Division have been failing and spend significant time in the garage. This would let them perform their daily tasks and affords them a vehicle that is versatile in use. The existing vehicles do not have towing capability and do not operate well in inclement weather. It is getting to the point where the repairs are more than the worth of the vehicles. Ms. Mailander stated that this was being awarded to the National Auto Fleet Group under the Sourcewell Contract.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that there are two 2015 vehicles, a Jeep Patriot and Ford F250, and the fact that one vehicle has three times the mileage that the other does and they are both treatment vehicles and makes her curious. Mr. Calbi stated that the initials in the parenthesis are the actual employees that operate the vehicles. Vehicle 163 is a service vehicle so that is currently driven by Jim Techio who is the Senior Water Operator. He goes to every well location to do repairs on a daily basis. The other 2015 vehicle is driven by Jose Leon who is a technician. The majority of his time is at the Wortendyke Facility but he does go out sometimes. Councilwoman Walsh asked about the other vehicles. Mr. Calbi stated that it depends on the use and who is using the vehicle, even though it is a Treatment vehicle, they all have varying responsibilities. Councilwoman Walsh asked about a 2017 vehicle that already has 32,500 miles. Mr. Calbi stated that belongs to Jose Martinez who is everywhere, every day, as the Superintendent.

b. Parking

1. Parking Rates – Permits, Meters

Ms. Mailander stated that the Walker Report indicated that we need an increase in meter rates. Their recommendation was to increase all meters to $1.25 an hour, to increase parking permit rates by $25, to increase CBD stickers and hangtags by $5 each. Right now, the CBD employee permits are $25 a year, and would go to $30 a year.

Councilwoman Walsh asked how many they have sold, because she has seen empty spots. She asked when they decide whether it’s even worth it because all of those empty spots are lost revenue. Councilman Sedon stated that we prices ourselves out of the parking market by overpricing, but if they keep the price down and have the additional spaces maybe they get more. Ms. Mailander stated that for the CBD stickers 141 have been sold, and then monthly it varies. For September the monthly hangtag was 54. If people work different shifts the hangtags can be shared, but the increase is $5 for each of them. Councilwoman Walsh asked what a metered spot would earn in the day. Ms. Mailander stated that it depends on how long they are there, so 8 hours times seventy-five cents. Councilwoman Walsh stated that she sees them as vacant. Ms. Mailander stated that the parking spots in Walnut are full almost every day.

Councilwoman Walsh suggested that maybe they should take the spots from Cottage, as the challenge for the Village is the balance if all the spots are full and you’re driving and see 30 empty CBD spots. Ms. Mailander stated that what they could do is make some of them flex spots, and all of them in Cottage flex spots, so this way it is first come first served every day. Councilwoman Walsh asked why do the flex spots, then. Ms. Mailander stated that they are paying for a permit. Councilwoman Walsh stated that they weren’t getting a discount on parking, though. Ms. Mailander stated that they were getting a discount if they buy the hangtags.

Councilman Sedon stated that he tended to agree with what they were saying that the employee spots do get used a lot more in Walnut versus Cottage. So, instead of taking them away completely, turn them into flex spots and then if employees are buying hangtags and are unable to park, they can adjust it. Mayor Hache stated that Cottage continues to be a very frustrating situation in that sense.

Ms. Mailander asked if the Village Council was willing to increase the permit prices by $5. Councilwoman Walsh stated that she didn’t see why they would have to increase the price. Ms. Mailander stated that Walker says the Village needs to increase the price in order to pay its debt service. Councilwoman Walsh stated that if they were taking the spots away, then that should balance it. Mayor Hache stated that he thinks the increase is a separate conversation from the usage. He stated that for the purposes of us staying on track with what Walker has suggested, we need to move forward with an increase. Mr. Rooney was in agreement and stated that we can determine how we allocate that and move forward.

Ms. Mailander stated that the premium parking permits are currently $1,300. This allows commuters to park in all lots and that will increase to $1,325. The regular parking permits which are Chestnut, Cottage, North Walnut, and the Park and Ride are $975 and are proposed to increase to $1,000. The resident and non-resident Park and Ride parking permits are at $975, so they will go to $1,000. And then the non-resident parking permits which are at Cottage Place only are at $1,950 and that will increase to $1,975. Ms. Mailander asked if everyone was okay with that $25 increase.

2. Parking Kiosks

Ms. Mailander stated that they would talk about the meters next. It is seventy five cents an hour currently everywhere. There have been a lot of different proposals, with more money on the street, or keeping the price the same between the street and the lot. She added that Mr. Rooney has done some calculations, which were discussed at the last meeting. They do need to increase the meters. Mr. Rooney stated that he provided the Village Council with a lot of data at the last Work Session.

Mr. Rooney stated that he went back to the kiosk costs and tried to bring it back in line. He provided a three year lease obligation and the amortization of the debt he used the maximum of 15 years. He went back and did a three-year on the purchase and the lease cost, and they are relatively flat. The reason being is there is no residual value, and after three years, the kiosks are ours. He sent the Village Council some revisions which showed the three-year debt principal and interest on the purchase. Some of the questions that were raised regarding the maintenance and warranty changed some of the projections, as well. If you lease under a 3 year term, you get a 3 year warranty. If you purchase, you only get a 13 month warranty with an option to pay for the additional months. Ms. Mailander added that originally they weren’t told that, but learned today that it was actually 13 months.

Mayor Hache asked what the expected life was of these kiosks. Mr. Rooney stated that the average life is ten years. There are several municipalities that have some that are 14 years old that they have been using. He added that Councilwoman Knudsen stated that you aren’t changing the technology though. Mayor Hache asked if they were including software updates as opposed to just hardware. Mr. Rooney stated that they will maintain the software. He added that after three years, the Village owns the kiosks. Doing the analysis of the maintenance costs that you would have to pay if you purchased it, you are paying less under the lease than you would be under the purchase. Eighty five meters leased at a three year cost would be $745,000 and that would give a cost per meter of roughly $8,800. Mr. Rooney stated that if you purchase it, you are looking at approximately $824,000 and the cost is $9,700 per meter.

Councilman Voigt asked with a lease with a 36 month warranty, if something breaks on it would they come to fix it. Mr. Rooney stated that the warranty is on parts except for the battery. Should it require installation, it is another coverage, however, based on three individuals that he spoke to, they are amazed at the capabilities that Signal has on fixing these things. So, he didn’t think they needed to worry about the labor costs.

Ms. Mailander stated that they needed to know if the Village Council wanted to purchase, lease, or do the entire Village now or continue to phase it. Mayor Hache stated that he thinks that if they are looking at the purchase cost as 10% higher than the leasing cost, and you are ending up with a three year warranty versus 13 month. Mr. Rooney stated that as to the revenue stream, he provided the Village Council with four different analyses as to where they would have the various increases. Mr. Rooney stated that his suggestion is to go $1.25 across the board. This way they are guaranteed the money to have the operations get up front if a year from now they decide that they have collected enough they can make an adjustment. His concern is that they have to make sure they have enough to finance the debt service. He added that there is an increase in revenue from the kiosks, but he can’t tell them that it will stay that high, say 40% for example. He would be more conservative, saying 15% is reasonable. Mr. Rooney suggested going with what Walker proposed, and using that as a guideline, he thinks they will be where they want to be. The other point is, he reached out to Walker to see if they had time and could meet a deadline to look at the change in projections. They could do that for a fee of $8,200.

Mayor Hache stated that with the purchase they are amortizing the cost over 15 years. Mr. Rooney stated that he changed that and brought it back to three years. Mayor Hache stated that realistically, the lease payments don’t change regardless of how long they hold the existing equipment. Mr. Rooney stated that was correct. Ms. Mailander added that Walker does indicate another price increase within a couple of years, but if they are doing well at $1.25 they may not need that. Mayor Hache added that it could smooth it out. Ms. Mailander stated that was correct, adding that it was a bit of an increase now but there won’t be another increase for a few years. Mr. Rooney stated that as Ms. Mailander pointed out at the last meeting, they don’t want to do this twice. Going by the information that they have available, he thinks it is very reasonable to do the $1.25 across the board.

Councilman Voigt asked if they needed a decision tonight. Ms. Mailander stated that they do because they need to get the ordinances adopted so they can be effective in time for January 1st. Mayor Hache asked from a pricing perspective, 25 cents now buys you 20 minutes, but 25 cents will buy you 12 minutes at $1.25. Councilman Voigt stated that he thinks they are really underestimating what the kiosks can do. If they go to $1.25 and they start to really bring in some revenue, he thinks they owe it to the town and the residents to back off that amount if they are doing that well. Mr. Rooney stated that was Council’s decision and his concern was that he doesn’t want to be short and then have to catch up. Mayor Hache asked what would be the assumptions in the revenues from the kiosk to get them to flat as opposed to going to negative. Mr. Rooney stated that he would have to do the math, but he thinks it would be worthwhile looking at.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that she thinks that Councilman Voigt is saying that in July, you have six full months of data. In July, if you are showing that your numbers are shocking, then at the August meeting they would make a plan for January. Councilman Sedon stated that he would still be in favor of seeing the data and getting the difference by Monday. Based on that, he would still be in favor of doing $1.25 on the street and $1.00 on the lots and they would look at it again in six months and review it in July. Mr. Rooney stated that would be his minimum.

Mayor Hache stated that he appreciated Mr. Rooney putting on the auditor hat, but the only reason they wouldn’t reach the same level of increase is that the attrition would not be as great. Then there has to be people who say that $1.25 is too much. Mr. Rooney stated that in his assumptions he took a 5% reduction, because as Walker said, it normally experiences 5% less usage when the rates go up and the people start to work their way back in. So, there is some reserve in there for that. Mr. Rooney added that he would get them the numbers.

Ms. Mailander stated that she needed to know if they wanted to do the entire Village now with the kiosks. There was agreement throughout the Village Council. Mayor Hache stated that what they did with the roll out for the pilot programs, the idea was to pilot North Broad. He thinks that the turnover in the spots is noticeable, and asked what the assessment is of how they have worked out. Mr. Rooney stated that he thinks they are fine, once people got over the change. Ms. Mailander stated that she thinks the new screens have been a help, as well. She added that she wanted to know how the Village Council felt about leasing or buying. Mr. Rooney stated that his suggestion was to lease and there was agreement among the Village Council. Councilman Sedon stated that you are paying a bit less and getting more of a warranty, and at the end of the day you own them.

Ms. Mailander stated that the revenue from this doesn’t just pay for the debt service. It pays for improvements to any lots, and PEO salaries. Mr. Rooney added that it would pay for this lease cost. Councilman Sedon stated that if Mr. Rooney could get them the numbers that Mayor Hache had requested for Monday, because the next meeting is in a few more days, then they could see the differential and decide on the rates. Ms. Mailander stated that they can’t write an ordinance unless they know, so they would have to wait until the 23rd of October. Councilman Voigt asked if that gave enough time for January 1st. Councilwoman Walsh stated that they could hold a special meeting. Ms. Mailander stated that it would be effective by January 1st. Mr. Rooney clarified that they were definitely doing the increases for the permits. Mayor Hache stated that the only thing up in the air is $1.00 across the board and what the assumption is for the kiosk increase and whether or not that is realistic. Ms. Mailander stated that they would discuss it on the 23rd and then have a Special Public Meeting that night.

c. Budget

1. Award Sourcewell Co-Op Purchasing Contract – 2020 Ford F250 Pickup – Shade Tree Division

Ms. Mailander stated that this was for the purchase of a Ford F250 for the Parks and Shade Tree Division through the Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing Program. Funding is in the Capital Budget, and this will rescind the resolution that was previously passed for a Ford Ranger. This vehicle is more versatile and will be better suited to the jobs that they do.

2. Award Contract – Tree Planting Throughout the Village

Ms. Mailander stated that they went out to get quotes. Six plan holders were eligible, and they received three. The low quote was from Clarke Moynihan Landscaping and Construction LLC out of Andover. It was for the planting of 100 trees, of 10 different species. The cost is $398 per tree. By comparison, when Mr. Rutishauser bid out the paving and curbing contract, the contractor quoted $500 per tree. This is $39,800 and there is money for tree placement and some additional money will come out of the Shade Tree Division Regular Operating Budget. She added that she had Nancy Bigos give an estimate of what it would cost to do this in house. With the salaries and internal coordination, the cost would be $27,200 and then the trees and supplies would be $22,695. So, she estimated about $49,895, but that doesn’t address concerns about delivery and storage of the trees, proper watering, and then the fact that staff would be redirected from their normal day to day activities for approximately 20 business days. It is about $10,000 less to have an outside contractor do it, as well as the fact that the Park Department currently has tree trimming scheduled out as far as April of next year. She recommended they accept this award.

Councilman Sedon asked when the trees would be planted. Ms. Mailander stated that they were looking to get them planted this fall. Councilman Sedon asked if it was some time in November. Ms. Mailander stated that was most likely. Councilman Sedon asked if a tree was planted in front of a Village residence would they be notified. Ms. Mailander stated that she would look into that. Councilman Sedon stated that they have been engaging in these tree plantings for several years now and the Village Arborist isn’t really involved in the plantings. So, he was hoping that the arborist could be involved in the supervision of this because you are talking about protecting an investment as you could potentially lose more trees. Ms. Mailander stated that her understanding is that by hiring this contractor, the contractor is then responsible for the tree and if it doesn’t make it they are then responsible for replacing that tree. Councilman Sedon suggested that the arborist could even drive by when they are doing an area to check and make sure that they aren’t cutting any corners.

Mayor Hache stated that it doesn’t have to be one or the other, as if they are talking about protecting an investment and supervising buys a certain level of insurance. The idea is to come up with a list of the trees that have been planted and in a year have the arborist take over from there, instead of assuming that the tree was fine after a year. Councilman Sedon was in agreement with that and added that a little bit of oversight on our part would go a long way and make a lot of sense. Ms. Mailander stated that she agreed.

3. Award Contract – Two Gearboxes – Water Pollution Control

Ms. Mailander stated that the Village received three informal written quotes for the replacement of a Winsmith double reduction gearbox including torque control at the Water Pollution Control Facility. The low quote was very good, so they are going to purchase two units because they have several of the gearboxes and this way they can replace ones that are failing. The recommendation is to award the work to Precision Electric Motor Works of Clifton, in an amount not to exceed $34,550.

4. ADA Compliant Curb Ramp Program

Ms. Mailander stated that Bergen County goes out for the ADA complaint curb ramps, which are those with the bubbles on them. So, the County is awarding a contract under the County Contract to P.A. Contractors of Green Brook, in an amount not to exceed $86,743.31. This is for going forward with the paving, where the Village does have to do those curb cuts.

5. Authorize Acceptance of Community Development Block Grant for Handicap Accessible Ramp for Zabriskie-Schedler House

Ms. Mailander stated that this was for the acceptance of the Community Development Block Grant for the handicap accessible ramp at the Zabriskie-Schedler House. The Village applied for this earlier this year and has been awarded an $80,000 grant to construct the ramp and this does not require matching funds. This is to authorize that grant and have it executed.

6. Discuss All Terrain Emergency Vehicle – Emergency Services

Ms. Mailander stated that at this point they need to make a decision as to whether or not the Village Council wishes to fund the ASAP or not. Councilman Voigt stated that there is the MedStat or the Gator, and he asked if the difference was $25,000. Ms. Mailander stated she believed that was correct. Councilwoman Walsh stated that she thinks the Gator is more versatile. She understands that the ASAP vehicle is enclosed and operates like a mini ambulance but if it can’t be driven on the street right into the hospital, that seemed like the big selling feature. Ms. Mailander stated that the Gator couldn’t do that either.

Mayor Hache stated that they discussed at the last meeting that if someone has been hurt and they put them on the Gator they actually have to immobilize them because it is not compatible with the stretchers. This delays the care and there were a lot of things that were mentioned as advantages. Councilwoman Walsh stated that those were extreme cases and we have ambulances available. It would really be in the instances where you can’t get the person safely off or somewhere where it is inaccessible. Councilman Voigt stated that he is okay with a Gator and he thinks that a MedStat is a bit of overkill. Councilwoman Walsh stated that she was okay with a Gator. Mayor Hache stated that he was fine with the ASAP. Councilman Sedon stated that he was fine with the Gator.

d. Policy

1. Flag Ordinance

Mr. Rogers stated that he provided the Village Council with a memorandum discussing another concept for the flagpole at Van Neste Square. He also included a draft of an ordinance that was a work in progress. Therefore it is not a public document and they just wanted to see what it might look like. He added that the Village Council should be aware of a recognized doctrine by the United States Supreme Court utilized by many communities throughout the United States known as the Government Speech Doctrine. He provided the Village Council with two cases and also some background wording from one of the decisions to show the distinctions between what the Government Speech Doctrine does versus a First Amendment free speech issue. This deals with content neutrality issues which means they would have to include safeguards if they go that route.

Mr. Rogers stated that the Government Speech Doctrine permits a municipality to advance its own form of expression or speech without having to adhere to content neutral type safeguards so long as it’s the municipality. In this case it is the Village Council making the decisions as to what the expressions or the speech should be. It emanates out of what has gone on throughout the years and how things have operated with monuments in public parks, flags or other types of structures that have been allowed in public parks over the years. What happened is that the United States Supreme Court said that the government can’t be confined to making sure that everything it does is content neutral. It takes positions with lots of different things, and as long as it is the governmental entity that is doing it, that Government Speech Doctrine is protected and certainly would qualify for certain things.

Mr. Rogers stated that there were a couple of instances that he provided to the Village Council, sharing examples of situations, showing that the court said that the government has its own right of speech. Even though public parks are often identified with the public in mind, the government owns the land and if a statue is accepted, it is meant to convey the speech of the government itself. So, it is certainly something that the Village Council can do in terms of dealing with the flagpole. The process would be that there is a thought or an idea of what type of a flag to fly, and by resolution the Council would decide what goes up and when it goes up. They would have the same guidelines in terms of timing and size of flags. With the plethora of applications that they may get with regard to non-commercial public interest type flags, the flagpole can only handle so many. Mr. Rogers added that there would be limitations with regard to that.

Mr. Rogers stated that it is a different approach, but he thinks it is something that the Village Council needs to be made aware of as they approach what should be done with this flagpole. If they use the Government Speech Doctrine, he believes that the American Flag Code applies, in which the American Flag has to be flown at the top, and everything else underneath it. He stated that it was something that the Village Council should consider, and decide which route they would like to go as far as making determinations.

Councilman Voigt asked if the flag was for public use only. Mr. Rogers stated that was what he was asking the Village Council to decide when they decide which method to use. Councilman Voigt stated that his personal feeling is that it is a public place and it should be for the public. Councilwoman Walsh stated that they have heard from residents with concerns. There are two flagpoles at Van Neste Square, and this is specifically in the northwest corner. The American Flag is always going to fly on the memorial flagpole, and this is a different flagpole. She added that they always wanted to fly the American Flag on both flagpoles, and the additional flag would go on the bottom if it could withstand it.

Councilwoman Walsh asked if there was an American Flag and an expression flag, if it is contradictory do they not fly the American Flag. Mr. Rogers stated that if you look at some of the wording from the case law, it says that a government can’t function by trying to take care of that in an ordinance. Government Speech has the discretion to decide which of those things goes up there, but with the other one you have to have protections for people who want something different and may be outside of the purview of what you intend. He added that at the same time to maintain content neutrality, you would have to allow that kind of banner.

Mayor Hache asked if they could resolve to say that the upcoming schedule of flags that will fly on the pole for the year, as opposed to what they were considering before which was having a logbook with requests. Mr. Rogers stated that as he read further about the Government Speech Doctrine it really is a government decision. He wrote in the memo that maybe there are times that people make suggestions about what should fly, and that is permitted, but you don’t want to have an application process because that is not government speech. He added that you would have to take out the application process if they went that route and work it in a different fashion where the Village Council would decide. Mr. Rogers added that it is done by public resolution and requires discussion, it also becomes less time consuming. He pointed out that he was trying to draw attention to the distinction between the two routes.

Mayor Hache stated that at any time they could decide that there is a national event and replace whatever it is that they had scheduled with something that is more significant to what was happening at that moment. Mr. Rogers stated that they could create a schedule for the entire year, but there may be other ways of dealing with it that may be less determined. The Supreme Court says that if you are going the free speech route, it is a very difficult task to make sure that you cover all the bases while remaining content neutral and provide the opportunities for all of these things to get in. This is very new ground with regard to the approach from a free speech standpoint, and you do lend yourself to a greater exposure when you go that route. If someone applied from a free speech standpoint and the Village decides these are obscene and insightful you expose yourself, whereas with Government Speech you don’t have that kind of thing.

Councilman Sedon stated that with the Government Speech aspect that could cut down on someone who would want to create an issue with an application, he added that with Government Speech someone would have to come in and publicly request a specific flag. Mr. Rogers pointed out that you didn’t need that, but you could leave the door open to hear requests. He added that the downside is that it is not the public expression that maybe some people were hoping for, it is the government expression. He asked the Village Council to think about it and offered for them to contact him individually. Ms. Mailander added that she would put that back on the agenda for the 23rd.

2. Hudson Street Parking Garage Construction Site – Authorized Signatory

Ms. Mailander stated that some materials need to be exported to an approved facility, so they need someone to authorize who can be at the site to execute and sign various manifests as well as permit applications and other documentation. This authorization will be given to Chris Rutishauser, Village Engineer, through a Village Council resolution.

3. Residency Requirements for Village Councilmembers

Councilman Voigt stated that he had inquiries from several residents regarding what the residency requirement is for existing Village Councilmembers. He has been working with Mr. Rogers as there are some state laws that are in effect relating to residency requirements for an existing Village Councilmember. He wanted Mr. Rogers to go through what those were, adding that he handed out the statute.

Mr. Rogers stated that Councilman Voigt sent him an email regarding several statutes that he wanted him to take a look at. The first was 40A:19-1.12 which says that no person can be a candidate or hold a local elected office unless he is a resident of that unit. The interesting thing is that there isn’t any set definition, but there are some other definitions that go into this. The next one is 40A:9-1.11 which deals with a definition for a resident and a resident is a person having within the local unit a place of abode which has not been adopted for any temporary purpose. This means that it is meant to prevent someone from jumping into a locale and deciding to see how they do, and it is also meant for dealing with situations where somebody may temporarily have to move from someplace where they are permanently domiciled. The courts look at certain things such as voter registration, and whether or not there is an ownership or lease at the property, driver’s license, and it says that they are not going to consider temporary places. Mr. Rogers stated that was what the courts and the statues say, as there is not one separate definition for residency, but it is subject to fact sensitive issues.

Councilman Voigt asked for clarification on the wording “when they cease to become a resident.” Mr. Rogers stated that he doesn’t know that it actually is defined, but he thinks it is all factually sensitive. Councilman Voigt asked if it was based on voter registration and driver’s license. Mr. Rogers stated that wasn’t ceasing, but to establish residency those are the things that the courts have looked at over the years to determine whether someone is a resident. Councilman Voigt asked what permanent domicile means. Mr. Rogers asked if there was a particular statue Councilman Voigt wanted him to look at. Councilman Voigt stated that there was a particular case he sent Mr. Rogers. Mr. Rogers stated that he wasn’t sent a case, but it was provided this evening and he could see that Councilman Voigt highlighted a particular section of that information that says domicile has been defined as a place where a person has their true home and particular establishment where after they leave they have the intention of returning. He added that he remembered reading those words, so maybe Councilman Voigt had sent it to him.

Councilman Voigt stated that the residents had questions on what the definition was, as they weren’t entirely clear, so he was assuming that they have to be a resident and have a permanent domicile in this locale. Mr. Rogers stated that was another word for a jurisdiction or town. He added that if your residence is in a municipality you can run in that municipal government or legislative district. Councilman Voigt asked if they needed to have any local law on this. Mr. Rogers stated that they can’t, this is state court and statute controlled.

e. Operations

1. Update of Graydon Pool Restroom Improvements

Ms. Mailander stated that the bid will be advertised in The Record by this Friday, October 4th. The bids will be due on October 23rd at 10:30 A.M. They will have a discussion of the bids that were received that evening at their Work Session, and then possibly be able to award at that Work Session depending on how much it comes out at, and as long as the Engineer has enough time to review the bids and make sure that they comply. They may also be able to have a Special Public Meeting at their November 6th Work Session. The length of the contract would be that it has to be completed before the season opens for Graydon; however they may start prior but may have to stop at some point due to weather.

The items in the contract include masonry repointing, door upgrades, repair of restroom partitions, repair of walls and ceilings, application of high performing paint coatings, installation of new barrier free restoration accessories, upgrade of interior and exterior lighting, and other related work for a complete project in accordance with the contract documents. This was developed with Connolly and Hickey, and the Village does not need to have prequalification of bidders for this building. Ms. Mailander added that she asked about the roof being replaced, and she was told that the work that is being done will not affect the roof in any way, so that project can go forward at this time.

2. Review of Best Practices Inventory

Ms. Mailander stated that this was the annual best practices that are sent out by the State. They have to answer questions about what the Village does in various areas of government and from those answers it is determined whether State aid will remain the same or change. Mr. Rooney has gone through this with various departments that are in charge of these different questions. They have two or three no’s, and are at the point where they will still get 100% of our State aid. Ms. Mailander added that they did an unscored survey this year that didn’t go towards the score.

Mr. Rooney stated that the reason for the unscored survey is for future use and whether or not they should ask these questions down the road. Since he has been here they have done their best to get all yes answers but there were a lot of questions that weren’t fair. The Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) met with the state over the past year and recreated a lot of the different questions that are here and seem to be very fair. He added that the GFOA did a great job in modifying this to be realistic. Ms. Mailander stated that the requirement is that they discuss this at a meeting, and she didn’t know if the Village Council had any questions about any particular questions.

Mayor Hache stated that some of the no’s seemed easy to rectify, as they were talking about cybersecurity threats and on-going education of staff, and those were things that seems very easy to fix. He added that he didn’t see anything concerning on here.

3. Resident Survey

Ms. Mailander stated that this is something that she brought to the Village Council that Fair Lawn had done about seven years ago. There are some similar questions to Fair Lawn, and others that could be discussed. She added that she didn’t know if the Village Council wished to do this, but she had a conversation with the Mayor where he said that any chance for input is a good thing. She highlighted some of the possible questions for the survey. Then it has areas for ratings.

Ms. Mailander added that they do have the ability to use SurveyMonkey and in addition they could have hard copies for anyone that didn’t want to go on the computer and do it. She added that if they had other questions that they could think of between now and Monday if they decided they wanted to move forward, they should get them to her and then they could get the survey up and running. She added that they could use the information to do things a little differently and to find out what people value.

Mayor Hache added that they should include some questions about the Central Business District. Councilwoman Walsh stated that she thinks that some of the questions need to have more of a qualifier, adding that maybe there would be a statement and a question. Mr. Rogers stated that it would be almost like a referendum. Councilwoman Walsh agreed, adding that if you knew that it was going to save you a certain amount of tax dollars would you be in favor of it. Mayor Hache stated that without the context of what the applications are, and Councilman Sedon added that people would be saying that they love curbside garbage pickup. He added that during the budget discussion they did a survey through the Visioning Process, but this would be different and they could use it to determine what residents’ value and there is an opportunity for savings. This would assist them in determining what people value more if they had to make budget cuts.

Ms. Mailander added that if the Village Council had specifics she would appreciate it so that they could get some good feedback and hopefully a good response rate. Councilwoman Walsh suggested that some of the 13 questions were all demographic, and if they have no intention of using that information she would just eliminate those, because the shorter and more concise the survey, the better. Mayor Hache added that at least the age question might be interesting in terms of the types of services that are important to which demographic. Ms. Mailander and Councilwoman Walsh discussed the recreation questions and how that applied to questions about age and number of children under the age of 18. Councilwoman Walsh stated that she thinks that people are going to answer surveys if they are quicker. Councilman Voigt asked if they were open to other questions. Ms. Mailander stated that she was and to let her know and also let her know if they wanted to clarify any other questions. She added that if they wanted to do the survey this month she would need the questions by Monday, and they could also use the answers for the budget.

7. REVIEW OF OCTOBER 7, 2019 PUBLIC MEETING AGENDA

Ms. Mailander stated that this was a review of the October 7, 2019 Public Meeting Agenda.

Proclamations: National Diabetes Awareness Month; and Recognize October 13, 2019 as Metastatic Breast Cancer Awareness Day.

There are no ordinances for introduction or public hearing for Ridgewood Water.

Resolutions for Ridgewood Water include: Award Professional Services Contract – Feasibility Study to Reactivate Ravine Well; Award Contract under State Contract – Fiber Network Collection and Build; and Award Contract under Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing Contract – 2020 Ford F250 Pickup – Water Metering Division.

The following ordinances are scheduled for introduction: 3751 – Amend Chapter 145 – Fees – Ridgewood Parking Permits and Central Business District Employee Parking Stickers and Hangtags; 3752 – Amend Chapter 145 – Fees – Parking Meter Fees; 3753 – Management Salary Ordinance; 3754 – Non-Union Salary Ordinance; and 3755 – Establish Regulations for Winter Door Enclosures for Businesses.

The scheduled public hearings include: 3747 – Amend Chapter 265 – Vehicles and Traffic; 3748 – Amend Chapter 190 – Land Use and Development – Driveways; 3749 – Establish Reserved Parking Spaces at Train Station Parking Lot – NJ Transit and Concession Stand/Social Service Association; and 3750 – Amend Chapter 265 – Vehicles and Traffic – 15 Minute Parking Meter on East Ridgewood Avenue.

The scheduled continued public hearing includes: 3746 – Bond Ordinance – Zabriskie-Schedler House – Phase III.

Resolutions include: Award Contract – Roofing of Graydon Pool Buildings; Award Contract – Ford Escape – Parking Enforcement Officers; Award Contract – Tree Planting Throughout the Village; Award Contract Under State Contract – Genesis Rescue Tools; Award Contract Under Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing Contract – 2020 Ford F250 Pickup – Shade Tree Division; Award Contract – Two Gearboxes – Water Pollution Control Facility; Award Contract – ADA Compliant Curb Ramp Program; Authorize Execution of Manifests for Hudson Street Parking Garage; Authorize Major Soil Moving Permit – 142 Elmsley Court; Authorize Execution of Community Development Block Grant – Zabriskie-Schelder House Ramp; Appoint Member to Planning Board; and Appoint Members to Zoning Board of Adjustment.

8. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

Hans Lehmann, 234 Union Street, stated that he was going to go back to what he referenced earlier, and would like to enter the record that there was an email sent to the Deputy Mayor on seven separate occasions to which he received no reply. He read the body of the email for the Village Council, regarding the CRAB Committee, adding that he hoped someone on the Village Council would get an answer for him.

Boyd Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that there was some discussion about the parking kiosks, and if he recalled correctly the kiosks were installed in the lots in the spring when it was light out late in the day. They attended a meeting at the BOE offices, and now it is starting to get darker earlier, and they found that the kiosk screen in the Cottage Street parking lot was difficult to see as there was no lighting. Mr. Rooney talked about there being 85 kiosks, and perhaps the kiosks on Broad Street and the Chestnut Street lot can be seen because those locations are lit very well, but when you start putting kiosks in locations that are not as well-lit he didn’t know if there was an option that they could be backlit. Mr. Loving mentioned Daylight Saving Time and the difficulty to see these kiosks in the dark when parking is in effect until 8:00 P.M.

There were no additional comments from the public, and Mayor Hache closed public comment.

9. RESOLUTION TO GO INTO CLOSED SESSION

Deputy Village Clerk Donna Jackson read Resolution #19-328 to go into Closed Session as follows:

10. ADJOURNMENT

There being no further business to come before the Village Council, on a motion by Councilwoman Walsh, seconded by Councilman Sedon, and carried unanimously by voice vote, the Village Council’s Work Session was adjourned at 10:49 P.M.

 

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Ramon M. Hache, Sr.
Mayor
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Donna M. Jackson
Deputy Village Clerk

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