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A REGULAR WORK SESSION OF THE VILLAGE COUNCIL OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD HELD IN THE SYDNEY V. STOLDT, JR. COURT ROOM OF THE RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE HALL, 131 NORTH MAPLE AVENUE, RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY ON JULY 10, 2019 AT 7:30 P.M.

 

  1. CALL TO ORDER – OPEN PUBLIC MEETINGS ACT – ROLL CALL – FLAG    SALUTE

Mayor Hache called the meeting to order at 7:30 P.M. and read the Statement of Compliance with the Open Public Meetings Act.  At roll call the following were present: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache.  Also present were Heather Mailander, Village Manager/Village Clerk; Donna Jackson, Deputy Village Clerk; and Matthew Rogers, Village Attorney.

Mayor Hache led those in attendance in the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag as well as in a Moment of Silence to honor the brave men and women serving in our armed forces and all our first responders.

  1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

Siobhan Winograd, 274 Ivy Place, stated that last July 18th she was disappointed to see the Village Council reinstate the Board of Education budget vote.  At that meeting there was a chart with numbers regarding voter turnout in comparison to off-cycle April and May and that chart was missing a lot of data, and some of the information was incorrect.  She was extremely concerned with the chart and a year later, the chart is circulating and just last week the Patch quoted those numbers.  She asked who made the chart and where it came from.  Ms. Winograd added that for the Board of Education, they break out the binary budget, yes or no, up or down, and the candidacy.  With regards to the chart, she knows that some people say that regardless of voter turnout, they would have reinstated the vote.  She doesn’t really feel that’s fair to the discussion because while this Village Council can decide, so can the BOE and they were here when the numbers were presented.

Ms. Winograd asked if anyone from the Village Council had reached out to the BOE and said that the numbers on the chart had been called into question and may have been incorrect.  She added that Ms. Jackson has numbers that may appear more accurate and she is also a part of One Village, One Vote and their numbers appear more accurate.  She stated that it is so disappointing to see these off-cycle elections that yield such low voter turnout can produce such critical decisions within our community.

Ms. Winograd stated that with all these decisions that need to be made, we all need to be looking at the same information but she really feels that the chart needs to be updated.  The numbers need to be publicly presented here again to reissue voter turnout and make sure that it is transparent and true.  She also feels that the BOE should be notified that there were some errors and issues on the chart from last July, and the press should be notified because the old numbers are still showing up.  Going forward, how Ridgewood residents vote is important to Ridgewood and it would be awesome on the website if there was a Ridgewood voter turnout tab where there could be some history.

Jan Philips, 234 Union Street, stated that she wanted to talk about Boards and Committees.  She looked at the 17 Boards and Committees and the two Commissions associated with each member of the Village Council and created a scoring system based on criteria that she had because she had been on a Committee with Councilwoman Knudsen who deemed these essential.  The criteria were attendance of committee members and Councilmembers; clear identification on the website of mission and committee members; clear identification on the website of committee minutes and terms of offices for all members. 

Ms. Philips stated that she started with Mayor Hache, but nobody got a passing grade based on that criteria and the takeaway for her was that Project Pride which seems to gather a lot of interest.  She added that there are members that had not been residents for a very long period of time, and that families are on that list.  She asked what the budget is for the committee, and it doesn’t list the correct Village Councilmember.  She added a comment that the Ridgewood Environmental Action Committee and the Green Team are now the same.

Scott Muller, 118 John Street, stated that he is the President of Ridgewood Baseball and Softball Association and they would like to make a gift to the Village of $16,200 for the repair of Upper Hawes Field, which is also referred to as Upper Pleasant.  The reason for the repair is to fix the field from all of the rain in the spring that drained from the school to the lower field and the baseball field clay washed away.  He added that they have shut the field down for the kids’ use because it is unsafe.  They are going to have to take out the whole infield, put down new dirt, clay and sod.  This is a two day project that won’t impact anyone.  Then it will be graded with lasers to make it pitch right and bring it up to level.  He asked for a resolution to have the Village Council authorize acceptance of the gift.

Councilwoman Walsh asked if Lower Hawes was owned by the Board of Education or the Village.  Ms. Mailander stated that she didn’t know off-hand.  Mr. Muller stated that the Lower field is owned by the Board of Education, and the Upper field is owned by the Village.

There were no additional comments from the public.

Mayor Hache asked Ms. Mailander about the chart that was circulated regarding voter turnout and where the information was from.  Ms. Mailander stated that she provided it to the Village Council.  She took the bottom numbers where the Board of Education (BOE) is and then determined the percentage.  The information that Ms. Winograd received from an OPRA request was the overall voter turnout with the bottom portion, because they found that people vote the top of the ballot and not the bottom.  Ms. Mailander acknowledged that the numbers would be different, as they were looking to find out how many people voted for the BOE in the General Election.  She determined it in consultation with Mr. Rooney, and it showed that the voter turnout was higher and people didn’t vote as much at the bottom as they did at the top.

Mayor Hache stated that people shouldn’t contact the Board of Education regarding the accuracy of those numbers, because the BOE looks to the Village for the tabulation of those numbers.  Ms. Mailander stated that she hadn’t contacted them.  Mayor Hache confirmed that the BOE usually gets the numbers from the Village.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that as a reminder regarding voter turnout, because they can play with numbers and percentages and statistics, but the bottom line is that zero percent of the registered voters can vote on a budget if there is only a November election.  Removing an April election, zero percent of the registered voters can vote on the election.  With an April election, 100% of the registered voters have the opportunity to vote on the BOE budget.

Councilman Voigt asked Mr. Rogers if that was correct.  Mr. Rogers stated that they have had this conversation a number of times and in June the Village Council asked him to find some information regarding the 2% cap.  He added that was what they would report back to the Village Council about.  He spoke with Mr. Rooney and the Village Auditor and there is a budget guideline that he circulated around with some comment with regard to how they are going to do this when the Auditor comes to speak about the annual audit.  They will force him to give them some answers with regard to the BOE budget when that comes up in August or September.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the last November budget vote for the BOE was in November 2017 or 2018, and the BOE increase was 3.62% and there was no budget vote in November even though the budget exceeded the cap, there was no vote.  This goes to that point as to whether or not an increase over the 2% cap necessarily goes to a vote to the people; there are a lot of exceptions.  Councilman Voigt added that he wasn’t going to argue about it anymore, but there is the opportunity to vote in November if it exceeds the cap and some of the exemptions.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that it can easily substantially exceed the 2% cap, and not result in a vote. 

Councilwoman Knudsen added that should you read information published on social media or on One Village, One Vote, she asked residents to email the Village Council and to understand that not necessarily everything that you read is accurate.  Councilman Voigt asked if Councilwoman Knudsen was saying that One Village, One Vote was inaccurate.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she was suggesting that posts on social media that suggested there was a vote and anything that exceeds 2% there is a vote on November and she stated so on social media.

Mayor Hache asked Mr. Rogers when this discussion was going to happen.  Mr. Rogers stated that when Bud Jones, the Village Auditor, comes here to discuss the annual audit in August or September, they will piggyback that issue in his presence that night.

  1. MANAGERS REPORT

Fourth of July Celebration – Ms. Mailander stated that July 4th was spectacular.  The weather cooperated this year, and they are grateful to all volunteer committee members led by Tara Masterson and Leigh Gilsenan.  She also thanked all Village employees who helped out that day.

Village Council Public Meeting – Ms. Mailander stated that the next Village Council Public Meeting is scheduled for Wednesday July 17th.  After that the Village Council Meetings are August 7th and August 14th because there is a reduced meeting schedule during the summer.

Zabriskie-Schedler House – Ms. Mailander stated that the first three bid submissions were rejected because of compliance issues.  The Historic Architectural Consultants met with their engineers to identify areas of cost savings.  They are fine-tuning the requirements and will put out the bid in the next few days.  At the August 7th Work Session they will discuss the award of the contract and possibly have a Special Public Meeting that evening so that they can award the contract.

Hunter Research performed an archaeological assessment at the Zabriskie-Schedler House and property to define areas of likely archaeological sensitivity within the property and to provide recommendations for archaeological resource management procedures, in particular for the Revolutionary War related archaeology on the property.  Due to its proximity to the Paramus Reformed Church and that the property was apparently an underdeveloped part of the church’s land, it is considered likely that some of these wartime activities extended onto the Zabriskie-Schedler property.  The first historic occupation of the property is considered to have taken place is 1825.  There are potentially historic objects related to the 200 year occupation of the house, and a moderate potential that remnants of the outbuilding survived.  An archaeological survey of the property is recommended if significant ground disturbance is planned.  There may be further investigation during the next few months during the rehabilitation and restoration.

Healthbarn – Ms. Mailander stated that Tracy and her staff at the Healthbarn painted the interior of their space and the paint supplies and staff time equate to approximately two thousand seven hundred dollars in improvements to this Village-owned property which was completed free of charge.

Bergen Bites Back – Ms. Mailander stated that Bergen Bites Back is a mosquito protection initiative.  Bergen County Mosquito Control recommends emptying any containers that hold water, clean drains and gutters, and keep swimming pools adequately treated with necessary products.  It only takes seven days for mosquitos to grow and by taking these efforts it would make a difference for all of us.

Ridgewood Guild Art in the Park – Ms. Mailander stated that the Ridgewood Guild is sponsoring Art in the Park Friday evenings, July 12th and August 2nd.  Take a stroll in Memorial Park at Van Neste Square and enjoy music and artwork displayed by local artists.  Art is for sale those evenings with proceeds benefitting the Ridgewood Guild.

Graydon Pool – Ms. Mailander reminded everyone that Graydon Pool is open for the summer season, with hours from 10:00 A.M. to 7:30 P.M.  Residents can purchase memberships in person at the pool office or at ridgewoodnj.net/communitypass.  Various program offerings and amenities include spray fountains, Adirondack chairs, a shade system, recreational game area, picnic area with tables and charcoal grills Wi-Fi accessibility, the Waterside Café from noon to 7:00 P.M., swim lessons, story time under the pavilion, a lending library, and special events include movie nights, concerts and more.

Kasschau Memorial Shell – Ms. Mailander stated that the Kasschau Memorial Shell located on Veterans Field behind the Library, provides free live concert popular music concerts on Tuesday and Thursday nights at 8:30 P.M. in June, July and August.  Bring a chair or a blanket and enjoy these concerts under the stars.  This program is presented due to the generous sponsorship of several local businesses and the Village of Ridgewood.  The Senior Bus will be available for transportation to several of these performances.  If you are an older resident and wish to go to one of these performances, please call 201-670-5500 extension 203 for details and for which performances they will have the bus available. Front row lawn chairs are provided by Age Friendly Ridgewood for the bus riders.

Ridgewood Guild – Ms. Mailander stated that the Ridgewood Guild provides Movies under the Stars on Wednesday nights twice a month in July, and August in Memorial Park at Van Neste Square at sundown.  This summer they will be showing Sleepless in Seattle on July 24th, The Sixth Sense on August 7th and ET on August 21st.  Bring a chair or a blanket and enjoy the show.

Farmers Market – Ms. Mailander stated that the Farmers Market is open every Sunday through October 27th on the West Side of the Train Station from 9:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M.  He encouraged people to come and meet the farmers, in addition there is a Jam Man, Bella Mozzarella, Pickle Licious, and Bounty Bakery.  The Ridgewood Farmers Market is a real farmers market and is brought to us by the members of the Ridgewood Chamber of Commerce.

 

Parking in Village-Owned Lots after 3:00 P.M. – Ms. Mailander reminded residents that parking in all Village-owned parking lots after 3:00 P.M. does not require a permit.  There are still time restrictions of three hours and parking fees are still in effect.

 

Mayors Wellness Festival – Ms. Mailander stated that the Mayors Wellness Festival is slated for Sunday, September 22nd from 11:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. in Memorial Park at Van Neste Square.  All local health, fitness and wellness providers are welcome.  Contact the Parks and Recreation office for further information.

 

Safe Streets to Transit Grant – Ms. Mailander stated that the Village would be submitting for a grant for Safe Streets to Transit for age friendly sidewalk improvements to Ridge Road, next to Ridgecrest and going down to the Train Station.  They are hopeful that they will be successful.  The deadline is July 19th, so the Village Council needs to do a resolution to apply for that grant.

 

  1. COUNCIL REPORTS

Ridgewood Environmental Advisory Committee and The Green Team – Councilman Sedon stated that the Ridgewood Environmental Advisory Committee and the Green Team are well underway to putting together an awareness plan for the upcoming implementation of the plastic bag ban that will happen in January.  They will have some reusable shopping bags to give out to residents towards the end of the summer and into the fall.

Shade Tree Commission – Councilman Sedon stated that the Shade Tree Commission met last night and some members expressed an interest in helping the Village to communicate the immediate next steps at the Schedler Property.  So, he wanted to get some information to them so they could get some information out to the neighborhood.

Councilman Sedon added that he noticed during the Fourth of July Parade that a lot of people were congregating under big giant shade trees and trying to get out of the sun.  He pointed out that they need to keep up with the canopy in the Village because if they don’t have trees then watching the parade is going to be less enjoyable for a lot of people.  They are making an effort to get as many trees planted as they can.

Security Reminder – Councilman Sedon stated that as a reminder, a couple of people that he has spoken to have had their cars were broken into.  So, residents should lock their car doors and not leave valuables in them.

Planning Board – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that Planning Board met last week for the reorganization.  Richard Joel will continue as Chairman, and Joel Torrielli as Vice-Chairman.  Chris Martin was reappointed as the Attorney for the Planning Board, along with their new Planner.  She added that the Mayor administered the oath of office to new members and members that are being reappointed.

Stigma Free Task Force – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Stigma Free Task Force met yesterday.  The initiative is to destigmatize mental health issues and they are trying to advance an initiative to make information available for crisis interventions and easily accessible information and numbers for emergency situations.  They are working on a placemat that will be available at the Daily Treat which is being funded through the Ridgewood FMBA Local 47 and the Mayors Wellness Campaign.  She added that they have been fortunate to have Dawn Cetrulo leading this charge and the Stigma Free Committee marched in the Fourth of July Parade.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they are fortunate to have Sheila Brogan as the BOE representation on the Task Force, and as a licensed social worker it is great to have her in the room.

Historic Preservation Commission – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Historic Preservation Commission meets tomorrow at 8:00 P.M.

Fourth of July – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it was an amazing event and day.  The parade and bands were incredible.  The amount of planning that goes into the all-day programming is difficult to imagine.  They are very fortunate to have Tara Masterson, Leigh Gilsenan, and Chris Raimundi leading the charge.  It is a 501(c)(3) organization that is self-funded and receives no funding from the Village.  The entire day went off perfectly, and the evening events entertainment was incredible.  There was a mishap with the fireworks.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Fourth of July Committee meets with Fire, Police, EMS, and the amount of meetings and making sure that every effort is made to ensure public safety.  When that mishap occurred they owed a debt of gratitude to the emergency responders which reinforced that their effort paid off.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that in regard to the public comment that was made earlier about the acceptable ratings for the Boards and Committees that the Village Councilmembers are on and participate in, and she disagreed with that comment.  They heard from two Councilmembers this evening on their processes and what they do with their Committees.  The Committees are members of the public, all volunteers, and they as a Council are on different Committees but also support each other’s Committees. 

Library – Councilwoman Walsh stated that the Library has the paperwork from the State and is reviewing everything and will hopefully come up with some questions if need be, but will also be working on any type of an application that is done.

Chamber of Commerce – Councilwoman Walsh stated that the Chamber of Commerce has 14 new members.  The Car Show is on September 6th.  There were some questions about the tree wells and what the process is in terms of Project Pride and the expectation of the property owners or business owners on what REAC or Shade Tree does.  Some of the business owners take pride and dress them up and weed them on a regular basis and then there are others that don’t.  If they don’t, does it then fall on the Village to maintain them.  The other question was about the blocks and drainage and how that process would move forward.

Councilman Sedon stated that Engineering is working on a spec to do one side of Chestnut Street, because individual test pits gets very expensive, so if they can do several it may be less expensive.  They are working on a bid to go out to see what it would cost to do one side of Chestnut Street.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that regarding parking, because they would be shifting parking from Hudson to the Train Station lot, the point came up again that the employee spaces are remaining vacant.  She tasked the Chamber of Commerce to talk among them to see if they want to turn all of those spaces into flex spaces and to see if it hurts both them and the Village.  They also wanted to know if the Village is planning any special celebration for Shovels in the Ground, and they wanted to be part of it and to be able to celebrate with the Village.

Mayor Hache stated that the Shovels in the Ground happens in August and they are planning a ceremonial event after everyone returns after Labor Day.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that the Chamber would like to participate and offered the use of their scissors.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked about the area from the sidewalk to the curb, because as a homeowner, it is her responsibility to maintain that.  She asked if that same rule extended to the CBD.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would have Councilman Sedon respond to that as they went through and did a cleaning a couple of years ago.  Councilman Sedon stated that the first year he was on Council they went through the summer and every Monday weeded the tree wells downtown.  They then had a landscaping committee where they discussed small gardens and whose responsibility it was.  So, they amended the snow removal ordinance for downtown and also included the tree wells so they would have a contractor go through and weed and mulch the tree wells.  After that it was supposed to be the store owners’ or landlords’ responsibility to pull the weeds.  That amendment was made and is on the books.  So, it is just a matter of enforcement. 

Councilwoman Knudsen added that she was talking about the weeds that are coming up from the sidewalk and elsewhere.  She added that Project Pride sends out a notice asking everyone to clean up in front of their buildings before the Fourth of July.  The weeds sometimes undermined the integrity of the concrete and masonry work.  Mr. Rogers added that they deal with that regularly and it is the responsibility of the property owner.

Citizen Safety – Councilman Voigt stated that the Sherman Place update, regarding excessive parking on the northern end behind 88 West Ridgewood Avenue.  The Mayor, Councilman Voigt, Chief Luthcke, Captain Amoroso, Sergeant Chuck, Ms. Mailander, and Mr. Rutishauser met with residents to discuss parking issues on July 1st.  They discussed various possibilities with the residents, who added that they were concerned with speeding on Washington Place.  Over the summer they would evaluate the usage of metered spaces on West Ridgewood Avenue and talk to the owners of the building to seek their input, and they will reconvene in September and monitor speeds on Washington Place.

Mayors Summit – Mayor Hache stated that July 18th from 9:30 A.M. to 12:00 P.M. is the Mayors Summit regarding PFAS and recovering the cost of removing drinking water contaminants.  This will take place at Middlesex Community College and is being sponsored by the Association of Environmental Authorities and the Drinking Water Coalition of New Jersey.

125th Anniversary – Mayor Hache stated that regarding the 125th Anniversary, they would be hosting a Gala Dinner at Felina.  The original discussion was to have it on Village property and to have a taste of Ridgewood, but Felina offered to open their doors to allow restaurants to bring in their catering.  That will take place November 2nd and they were going to send out more details in weeks to follow.  The next meeting is scheduled for next Monday.

  1. Presentation – Kensington Senior Living

Michael Rafeedie, a development partner, presented the potential preliminary plans for Kensington Senior Living, an assisted living community in Ridgewood.  Kensington was started formally in 2010 by a few principal partners who were former executives of one of the nation’s largest assisted living companies.  They have built and managed over 400 assisted living communities and financed over $6 billion in real estate across the United States and into Europe.  He added that they are a developer owner-operator assisted living community, and are their own developer owner-operator assisted living community, internally funded, and have no intent to sell.  They don’t take any money from Wall Street, pension funds, or life companies which allows them to make decisions quickly without any bureaucracy and allows them to do the best thing for their residents and communities.

Mr. Rafeedie stated that today they have seven built properties with another under zoning.  They have a property in White Plains, New York; Falls Church, Virginia; and are under construction in Weston, Virginia.  They also purchased in Kensington, Maryland.  They are concurrently attaining zoning approvals in Verona, New Jersey.  They own a property in Redwood City, California, and have a building in Sierra Madre, California, and opened yesterday in Redondo Beach, California.

Mr. Rafeedie stated that they are the contract purchasers of 246, 256, and 264 South Broad Street adjacent to the West Bergen Mental Health.   It is 1.8 contiguous acres zoned R-3, and the auto body shops are a non-conforming use.  He added that there is a variety of uses in this specific area.  There are institutional uses in the surrounding churches, there is residential in the single family homes, and multi-family use.  He stated that they believe the use fits into the corridor as there is not one specific use that dominates the corridor.  Mr. Rafeedie stated that the existing conditions are that the auto body shop is non-conforming uses.  The area and the site is somewhat of an eye-sore and is the blight in the area as the buildings are likely non-complaint with current code, and a recent environmental study that they conducted showed that the site is likely contaminated.

Mr. Rafeedie stated that Kensington was proposing 90 plus or minus units of assisted living with up to 130 state licensed residents.  They are proposing six stories of living over a parking garage at grade, hidden behind the facade.  The architecture is historically inspired and is a custom tailored design to fit Ridgewood.  Varied rooflines with dormers and varied high end materials in the façade, a combination of a secure garage and outdoor parking spaces.  The conceptual site plan is that the building wraps a central courtyard with each level having its own outdoor space in the center.  The building is set back from South Broad which creates a promenade.  There is a full 360 degree egress access around the site with two entrances on either side for garage access.  There is loading in the rear and the setbacks and parking spaces create a setback to adjacent properties.

Mr. Rafeedie displayed some the projects that they have recently built, showing the one in Virginia that was built two years ago on a downtown busy road in an urban area.  He displayed the building in White Plains, which was not representative to the architectural style or height of the building in Ridgewood, and he showed it to display that each building is custom to the site and thoughtfully inspired by the exact site.  The location in Verona is on Bloomfield Avenue, and in California he displayed those locations as well.

Mr. Rafeedie talked about what they were proposing in Ridgewood, and showed photos of the interior that they were proposing from a Falls Church property.  He showed an entry foyer, and the quality was representative of what they would do here in Ridgewood.  Today, if a senior needs help with daily activities they must leave Ridgewood, and it is their belief that folks who need assistance should be able to stay, live and thrive in the town they helped build and where their kids went to school and today they cannot do that in Ridgewood.  Additionally, 10% of the beds will be in accordance with the State Medicaid program which qualifies as affordable housing. 

Mr. Rafeedie stated that they are proposing to invest and continue the revitalization of the South Broad Street corridor.  He added that every time they erect a building they get involved in the fabric of the community and partner with various groups.  He stated that he has been in contact with Reverend Brandon and Reverend Brown from local churches, and Age Friendly Ridgewood and they have had good open productive discussions on how they could partner together.  There are many more stakeholders that they plan to meet with to establish true partnerships with various groups in town. 

Mr. Rafeedie stated that they sponsor many local events such as food drives and clothing drives.  Additionally where the site is located, he believes that local businesses will benefit from employees, residents, and visitors.  He added that assisted living is a benign use with increased tax revenues with very little expenditure.  The residents don’t drive and they have zero school district expenditures.  They will create about 120 full time jobs and 50 part time jobs.  The building itself spends a lot of money locally as each building has hundreds of different vendors.  They serve nearly 500 meals a day and get food delivered constantly which could be a great source of revenue to local suppliers.  Mr. Rafeedie added that they would love to partner locally with businesses inside of Ridgewood if the services are available.

Mr. Rafeedie stated that there are a few different avenues to helping this property get into Ridgewood, and the most appropriate would be through a redevelopment designation.  A redevelopment designation allows Ridgewood to work closely with Kensington to come up with an acceptable design, bulk design list of uses, to have more control over the process and what gets built there.  Tax abatements can be granted which gives the Village more control over where the revenue goes and how it is shared.  Additionally, this site is likely contaminated and redevelopment areas can be eligible for funding from the state.  Affordable housing in a redevelopment area can also be eligible for credits as well.  He added that they are excited about this potential project and opened it up for questions.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that the corridor is going to have increased capacity with the development going in there and the parking garage.  So, with 120 employees and 50 part time employees, how many on-site parking spots are they talking about at grade and then built above for the employees.  Mr. Rafeedie stated that they will have roughly 70 parking spaces which encompass staff, employees, and residents although the residents typically don’t drive.  The State requirement is 0.5 per unit, so they are proposing 70 spaces.  Councilwoman Walsh asked how much would be affordable housing.  Mr. Rafeedie stated that it would be 13 plus or minus beds.

Councilman Voigt asked if they are going to do a traffic study and will it provide some information on the level of in and out at that particular location.  He added that he assumes it is going to be low based on the types of people that are going to be there.  Mr. Rafeedie agreed.  Councilman Voigt asked about the types of jobs that were going to be created and asked if there would be any preference for Village residents.  Mr. Rafeedie stated that they typically find that employees come from the town or closer to where they live so that naturally happens.  They advertise and do job fairs locally.  They have jobs from 10 to 15 management level, to dining staff, caregivers, housekeeping, drivers, nurses, LPNs.  Councilman Voigt asked if the 10% of units being Medicaid was by State law.  Mr. Rafeedie stated that was correct.  Councilman Voigt asked if there was any inclination to make it higher than that.  Mr. Rafeedie stated they could talk about that. 

Councilman Voigt asked if they would be paying taxes there.  Mr. Rafeedie state that it would be a redevelopment area pilot, but yes.  Councilman Voigt asked if he could provide the information as to what those taxes might be.  He asked about the types of residents that would be there from activity levels to things they would be doing in town.  Mr. Rafeedie stated that the majority of residents are non-independent and the units are 300 to 600 feet with a kitchenette and it is true assisted living.  Some need lighter care and some are there because their spouses are there.  There are folks in the late stages of dementia.  The encourage activities they have a bus and take the residents to shows and games, and facilitate the residents going out and bring folks in for music and shows.  Councilman Voigt asked if there was any thought about how they would incorporate this with Age Friendly Ridgewood.  Mr. Rafeedie stated that they spoke with Sheila Brogan and Beth Abbott and there is a lot of education, and there is an option today that doesn’t currently exist, so there is a referral there too.

Councilman Voigt asked how big their bus was.  Mr. Rafeedie stated that it probably holds about 50 people at any given point.  Councilman Voigt asked if there were any thoughts about using the bus with other senior housing in the area.  Mr. Rafeedie stated that was definitely possible.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that her questions were similar to those of Councilwoman Walsh and her questions regarding employment opportunities as they relate to the number of parking spaces.  Also, the obvious is the width of the street, and Bloomfield Avenue is a much busier, wider, more traveled route, so it is very different.  Clearly Broad Street has its challenges, and it’s a narrow corridor, so she was concerned about that.  She thinks that they were here years ago when Kensington first approached them and some of the questions that were raised then were the number of emergency vehicles that come and go.  There are delivery trucks, laundry services, and a tremendous amount of activity that comes along with this type of facility, so those were her concerns.  Mr. Rafeedie stated that they did a survey regarding the ambulance and it is about six to eight visits per month per property.  They are typically not emergencies, which count people coming from or going to rehab or the hospital.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that several times Mr. Rafeedie stated that the site was likely contaminated and she said that she thought they did some work but that term seemed non-committal.  Mr. Rafeedie stated that they did a Phase I which does not involve digging and it came back and said that it was likely contaminated for a few reasons.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if the Village Council had a copy of the presentation and the report that he was speaking about. 

Mayor Hache stated that in terms of the communities where they currently operate, they are very different from each other, and asked how they typically measure the impact of the relationship within the communities and what is typically the feedback that they get in terms of the quality and the impact on these communities.  Mr. Rafeedie stated that it is typically more than what they thought than during the zoning process.  When it is built they receive letters from Councilmen, the Mayor, or Planning Board members thanking them for being there.  Mayor Hache asked if there was any plan for any sort of exit or was the plan to keep this a multi-generational type of business.  Mr. Rafeedie stated that to his knowledge they are generational assets and they have no intent at this point to sell or capitalize as they are 95% owned by three individuals.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they were looking to have this redesignated as an area in need of redevelopment.  Mr. Rafeedie stated that was correct.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked about the grant monies available for an area in need of redevelopment and for an area in need if remediation.  Mr. Rafeedie stated that he believes there is money available for redevelopment areas for sites that are contaminated.  He wasn’t sure how much or the extent of the contamination.  Mayor Hache stated that all they were waiting for now was just the report of the contamination.

  1. DISCUSSION

 

  1. Ridgewood Water

 

  1. Award Contract – State Cooperative Purchase – Service Truck Western Star Chassis and Reading Utility Body

 

Ms. Mailander stated that due to the ongoing equipment replacement program, they identified vehicle #97 needs replacement.  It is a 2004 service truck that is used daily by the Distribution Division at Glen Avenue.  It is a mobile water main repair vehicle housing all parts and tolls to repair 24/7 throughout the service area.  This truck is vital to Ridgewood Water’s operation and key to successful water main repairs.  The truck has over 52,912 miles and over 12,209 engine hours.  Major repairs have been completed including a rebuilt engine; the most problematic issue has been the onboard generator compressor.  When the onboard generator fails, the truck has to be sent out for repairs and they cannot remove the generator from the truck for service.  So, it causes excessive downtime of a vehicle that is needed to perform emergency repairs.  They are replacing the truck with one that affords reliability and efficiency needed to maintain the water distribution system.  It is a 2020 Western Star steel utility body and a detachable air compressor/generator.  This will allow Ridgewood Water to remove parts for repair and allow the vehicle to remain in service.  The cost is $286,469.  Western Star is from Cliffside Body and the air compressor is from Vanair.  Ms. Mailander stated that funding is in the Water Capital Budget.

  1. Award Contract – Additional Award for Resurfacing and Repair of Water Utility Locations

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was an additional award for the Ridgewood Water Company.  Earlier this year they awarded a paving bid, the low bid was from American Asphalt and Milling Services of Kearny.  At this time, Ridgewood Water has miscellaneous locations throughout its service districts that need milling and paving work, so they would like to award an additional amount of $40,000 to do the minor paving and concrete work.   This is being paid for out of the Ridgewood Water budget.

 

  1. Award Professional Services Contract – Engineering Consultant for Farview and Eastside Station Improvements

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is a Professional Engineering service.  On June 20th they received proposals from three pre-qualified engineering firms, Boswell Engineering, Arcadia U.S., Inc., and Suburban Consulting Engineers.  Boswell Engineering, Inc. providing the lowest cost at $150,000 is being recommended to be awarded and will be paid for out of the Ridgewood Water Capital Budget.  The improvements are necessary to correct building, electrical, mechanical, site and system deficiencies such as replacing old pumps, installing new variable frequency drives, replacing old HVAC systems, upgrading and consolidating electric components, and things of that nature.  This will require a pay to play, so as long as we have that, we can award it next week.

 

  1. Award Contract – Infrared Asphalt Surface Repair, Asphalt Trench Patching, and Miscellaneous Curb and Sidewalk Repair

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Village received bids on July 2nd for infrared asphalt surface repair, asphalt trench patching, and miscellaneous curb and sidewalk repairs at various locations.  There are six plan holders and they received three bid packages.  J. Fletcher Creamer Construction was the apparent low bidder at $1,165 for the aggregate amount of all the unit items.  The bid will be shared by the Village of Ridgewood with Ridgewood Water Company, and other interested communities, as they have expressed an interest in using the low bidder for their pavement/concrete restoration work in the past.

The intent of this contract is to have available means to restore Village streets to a “new condition” after an excavation has been made.  The contract will also be used to repair excavations done under Village street opening permits where the contractor failed to satisfactorily restore the street.  Funds for this award are available in the Ridgewood Water budget account and from permit fees for street opening permits.  The Ridgewood Water Company recommends award of a contract in an amount not to exceed $150,000. 

Councilwoman Walsh asked why the contract was $150,000 when the bid was only $1,165.  Ms. Mailander stated that these are the unit prices and then they use it as needed, so the total to be used between now and next June is anticipated to be approximately $150,000.  Councilwoman Walsh asked how many units that was.  Ms. Mailander stated that she didn’t know as it depends on what they use, what size the opening was, and what type of material they need to close it up.

 

  1. Parking

 

  1. Designate Parking Spaces in Train Station Lot for Hudson Street Lot Permit Holders

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the people who had Hudson street permits were going to participate in a rideshare program when the Hudson Lot closed.  Due to the reconfiguration of the Train Station with approximately 35 additional spaces and the fact that they only sold 12 of those Hudson Street permits it has worked out well.  They are going to designate 12 spots for Hudson Street permit holders, so they will have spots available at the Train Station.  She added that they have to create an ordinance to allow for this.  Mr. Rutishauser reviewed this and there were 12 spots right when you pull in to be all Hudson Street permit holders and it would be easy for the PEO’s.

Councilwoman Walsh asked if there was a default in the process, and why they would get a premium amount.  Ms. Mailander stated that they paid premium prices, and they were going to provide a rideshare service taking them directly to the train station and at this point they were going to give them spaces at the train station to park in.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that they were being displaced.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that they were being displaced, but it wasn’t different than anyone else as they didn’t pay any more than the holders who are first come first serve. Councilwoman Knudsen stated that those tags are specific to Hudson Street.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that the cost is the same as the ones that can park anywhere at the Train Station.  Because there was never an agreement that they would get premium spots there, wouldn’t they get passes like everyone else.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she thought it was an administrative effort to make it easier for the PEO’s because those tags are different.  There was additional discussion with Mayor Hache saying that normally they wouldn’t give anyone special designation but because of the construction they were going to designate the spaces for the Hudson Street permit holder.

Ms. Mailander added that going into 2020 they will be able to sell more Premium Parking Permits, and perhaps they won’t sell out as quickly because there will be more spots available at the Train Station.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that technically they would have to decrease it by 12 for the remainder of this year.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the timing worked out and that was the reason they weren’t doing the rideshare.  Councilwoman Walsh added that she thought there would be a default if enough passes weren’t sold and it wouldn’t be feasible.  Ms. Mailander stated that there was no default.

 

  1. Budget

 

  1. Award Contract – National Cooperative Purchase – 2019 Ford F350 Pickup – Signal Division

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was for the furnishing and delivering of a new Ford F-350 pickup for the Division of Traffic and Signal and was a replacement of a vehicle a 2001 Ford F-250 pickup with 63,680 miles.  The National Cooperative Purchasing Program is Sourcewell, and as in the past they will buy the plow separately because the local supplier has a cheaper price.  The award of the contract is to National Auto Fleet Group in Watsonville, California, in an amount not to exceed $52,226.  This will provide more reliable service than the vehicle it replaces and will also be added to snow plowing operations.

 

  1. Resolution to Reject All Bids – Zabriskie-Schedler House Rehabilitation

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Village received bids from three qualified bidders on June 4th.  They received two bids on time and the third bidder got lost in Village Hall and was late for the bid opening.  The circumstances were reviewed with Mr. Rogers.  The lost bidder’s bid was never opened on June 4th, and upon the advice of Mr. Rogers a second opening was conducted on June 19th.  The three bids range from a low of $1,141,900 to a high of $1,249,697.  All three bids exceeded the architects’ estimate which was at $784,800.  The architects are currently talking to the prequalified bidders and have recommended rejecting all bids.  They have identified some cost savings which will be incorporated into the new RFP.  Three of the five prequalified bidders sent a proposal but it is likely that they might have all five bidding in this round because the other two might have bid on projects that they didn’t get.  So, the architects are hopeful that they will get bids from all five.

The proposed schedule for bidding is that on July 15th the RFP will be made available to the prequalified bidders, due on August 1st, they will be discussed August 7th, and then with the permission of the Village Council they will have a Special Public Meeting on August 7th.  Connolly and Hickey said that they find the cost differences between the bids stem from the construction industries’ increasing costs for materials and labor.  The increase in both labor prevailing wages and material costs has increased year after year.  Ms. Mailander stated that contractors used to see an 8% increase in profit and it is now closer to a 15% increase, which is also due to the new tariffs that have been implemented.

Councilman Voigt stated that the initial estimate was $785,000 and these are $1.14 million to $1.25 million so they are over by $700,000 on the low end.  He asked if that also included the remediation.  Ms. Mailander stated that would be discussed next.  Councilman Voigt stated that they were looking at about $450,000 to $600,000 over what they initially estimated.  Ms. Mailander stated that was correct.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked when the Connolly and Hickey estimate was completed.  Ms. Mailander stated that they originally went out some time in January just for the roof and then they decided to combine all of the bids together in the spring, so she thought that the estimate was from sometime last fall.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that was a pretty big increase in that period of time, and it was interesting because she pulled up the documents today regarding the Certificate of Eligibility from the State Preservation Office which predates everyone here.  The importance of preserving history is important but there is a cost and she would like to see the original documents again because the number is just significantly higher.

 

  1. Award Contract – Zabriskie-Schedler House Hazardous Materials Removal

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the bids were opened June 4th, and there were seven bids ranging from a low of $90,240 to a high of $257,475.  The low bid was received from Unicorn Contracting Corp. of Woodland Park.  They are recommending the award of this contract.  This remediation has to take place first anyway before any other work is done.  They will hopefully be able to get it all on track in August and this one can be awarded next week and can hopefully begin soon.

  1. Award Contract – National Cooperative Purchase – 2020 Kenworth Packer Body Truck – Division of Solid Waste

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is award of contract under Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing for a 2020 Kenworth Packer Body Truck for the Division of Solid Waste, in the amount of $195,752.20.  This replaces a 2003 Crane Carrier Truck which has 124,286 miles and 25,430 engine hours.  Most garbage trucks have a life span of ten years, and this was 16 years.  There are currently issues getting parts for this make of truck so when it does break down it is very difficult to repair.

 

  1. Purchase of Fire Engine – Correction of Resolution

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was the correction of a resolution that was adopted June 12th.  There is a new Pierce Saber Fire Engine through the Houston-Galveston Area Cooperative Purchasing in an amount not to exceed $478,703.15.  That resolution incorrectly listed Pierce Manufacturing as the vendor, which should actually be Fire and Safety Services out of South Plainfield.  This resolution will correct the June 12th resolution with the correct vendor and also rescind the original resolution.

 

  1. Declare Property Surplus – Fire Engine

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this resolution declares the 2000 Pierce Dash Fire Engine surplus.  It has reached the end of its useful life and is not needed for public use.  By declaring it surplus it will be used as a trade in for this Pierce 2020 Fire Engine in the amount of $28,000 which will be applied to the purchase of the 2020 Pierce Saber Fire Engine.

 

  1. 2018 Annual and 2019 Quarterly Financial Statements

 

Mr. Rooney stated that he presented two sets of Financial Statements to the Village Council.  One is the assets revenue expenses as of year-end for three funds, and the other is the revenue expense as of April 30, 2019 against the 2019 budget.  The 2018 information, most of which they discussed during the budget process, but he would go through that first.  On page 1 of the assets for the current fund, there is a significant decrease in the assets primarily due to the cash that was collected in 2017 for the pre-paid taxes.  That also has a slight impact on delinquent property taxes increasing in 2018, the way some of the taxpayer’s request refunds after the first of the year. 

Mr. Rooney stated that the grant fund was relatively flat with the elimination of the interfunds in the prior year and the slight increase in the grant’s receivable.  In liabilities and fund balance, they noticed an increase in the encumbered amounts which basically are reservation of funds during the year and unspent monies during the year as well.  Of that $2.4 million unencumbered, 25-30% is paid down in 2019 for those items that should have been encumbered but were not.  There is a decrease in fund balance overall of roughly 5%.  The grant fund is consistent pretty much with the prior year.

Mr. Rooney stated that revenues showed a slight increase of 1.7% compared to the prior year and appropriations showed a roughly 2% increase that resulted in approximately a 5% reduction in fund balance because of the increase in utilization of fund balance utilized in 2018 compared to 2017 and the slight decrease compared to expenditures for income over expenditures.

Mr. Rooney stated that the Water Utility operating fund has a slight decrease in cash offset by available reserves which are down in the liabilities.  The fund balance showed an 8% increase over the prior year, that is primarily a result of unexpended balance for appropriation reserves of almost $2 million over prior year.  This was to offset the shortfall in revenues that they had because of the rainy season.  So they canceled appropriations to balance that out which resulted in approximately 8% increase in fund balance.

Mr. Rooney stated that the Parking Utility operating fund has a slight increase in cash due to the timing of payments and also the rate increase that went into effect in September.  This resulted in approximately 6% increase in fund balance which results in the lack of funds that were available at the time when they did the budget in 2018 to pay over to the current fund to pay for prior year operating losses, so that is what generated the increase in fund balance at the end of 2018.  The increase in parking lot fees and permits as a result of the rate increase that went into effect in the last quarter and the timing and amount of budget in the fund balance reduction $300,000 in the expenditures which contributed to the increase in fund balance.

Councilwoman Walsh asked about 3,002.19% unexpended balance of appropriation reserves.  Mr. Rooney stated that in 2017 only $4,000 lapsed and in 2018 some of the money was paid out in 2019 but it was $125,000 at the end of the year which is a 3,000% increase.

Mr. Rooney stated that the current fund revenues as of April 30, 2019 which shows the budget that was adopted during the year.  He doesn’t do these in March or quarterly because he needs the budget to be adopted before he can reflect comparison.  They use 33% as criteria for discussing any fluctuation.  Most of the revenue items that have exceeded or have come short are the result of timing.  A significant portion is revenues not billed out until June on a cash basis that can’t be reflected until the money is collected.  Grant funds are realized 100% and in the maintenance and support of education vehicles that is only 20% and has increased significantly in the past two months.  The State distribution they only get in September so that was at 0%.  Everything through the rest of the general revenues is pretty much on target and there are one or two items because of timing but overall the actual to budget is approximately 32% so it’s right where they expect it to be.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that in the budget process they talked about them changing the building codes, and she asked what line item that was where the fees that they had been able to charge and weren’t going to be able to anymore.  Mr. Rooney stated that it was page 8, uniform construction code fees, and they are slightly behind right now at 26% but according to Tom Yotka, the developments are going through and they are collecting more and more money and in the past two weeks they made $150,000 and it seems like it is where it should be.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked when the change in the Uniform Construction Code fees went into effect.  Mr. Rooney stated that started in September last year when they eliminated the certain fees that they could charge. 

Councilman Voigt asked about ambulance billing and timing affecting that.  Mr. Rooney stated that it is on a cash basis and the month of April may not have been received until May.  Councilman Voigt asked from a billing standpoint if they were on track and if they were just waiting for the cash.  Mr. Rooney agreed that was the problem that they can only show the cash.  Councilman Voigt asked about the cellular tower and $180,000 for the year, with $85,000 so far and if he thought it was going to be higher.  Mr. Rooney stated that if they did, it wouldn’t be by much as these are determined at the beginning of the year by contract.

Mr. Rooney stated that there wasn’t anything in the appropriations that was outlandish or anything to be concerned about.  Councilman Voigt asked about other insurance, and Mr. Rooney stated that it was all due to timing of the bills, and in some cases they pay premiums in February/March for the whole year.  He stated that they have 47% of all expenses for Police, which is quite high however they have put in a lot of blanket orders for expenses that they expect to incur and 9/10 times those blanket orders are less when the actual comes in so they are not concerned.  Councilman Voigt asked what the other expenses represented.  Mr. Rooney stated for example: ammunition; which they anticipate spending $500,000 for the year and will put a blanket order in for $500,000.  So, they can’t spend that money because they anticipate spending that amount.  When they get to the end of the year they may have only spent $350,000 so there is excess money there that goes back into the balance.  He added that these are for known items that they are purchasing year after year, which they also do in Public Works for tires so that money won’t get spent on something else.

Councilman Voigt asked where overtime was in that.  Mr. Rooney stated that it was in salaries and wages.  Councilman Voigt asked how they were doing with that.  Mr. Rooney stated that they were on track for what has been budgeted.

Mr. Rooney stated they have one or two encumbrances where they accrued excess time because of snow removal in the beginning of the year and they deal with that when they come into November if they need funds to transfer to cover any overages.  They pay the whole year pension out up front, so that takes 100% of the appropriation.  He added that some things are contractual and they make payments for six months so that counts for higher than 33% of the budget.  Mr. Rooney said that debt service is affected by time and when maturities are due, overall the appropriations were on target.

Mr. Rooney stated that water rent is about 26% of the budget so that is slightly down from what they anticipate as they have had a rainy season and will pick up the $157,000 water rents that will be billed in July.  Fire hydrant service is a third quarter billing and miscellaneous is paid contractually for cell tower rents.  Appropriations, to offset the shortage in revenue they have less money spent in other expenses for the purchase of water so that balances it out and is the same as what they had in 2018 where they adjusted their spend to offset any shortfalls in revenue.  Councilman Voigt asked about capital improvements and if they anticipated that was going to go over.  Mr. Rooney stated that they were on target with spending.

Mr. Rooney stated that the parking meters increases the result of the rate increase that they put through last year and he was glad to see that they were moving forward with that so when the time comes to analyze rate increases they can take a look and see where they are and how to postpone that fee.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if some of that was captured lost revenue.  Mr. Rooney stated it wasn’t on that line as it was straight revenue from meters, kiosks, and Parkmobile.  On the appropriations side the money was going over to the General Fund for operating losses that they had in the past.  The surplus to General Budget is down $300,000 to what it was last year and that is where they were paying back to the General Fund.  Councilman Voigt asked about the parking meters, as after four months it looks like they would be well above and if that was just due to the increase.  Mr. Rooney stated that it was primarily due to the increase.  He added that when you budget the revenue you can only budget as much as you realized in the prior year, and since they didn’t have that increase last year he couldn’t anticipate it this year.  Councilman Voigt stated that it looks like about $150,000 to $500,000 over for this year.  Mr. Rooney stated that you would lose some parking this year due to the construction of the garage.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that even though they lose those spaces because of the garage, they are making up spaces elsewhere.  So, based on the usage in the rent past, they might not really be using as much as they think.  Mr. Rooney stated that he agrees 100% but the thing that they can’t gauge is when there is construction-related street closure.  On the appropriations side, salaries and wages are down because they lost a couple of PEO’s and are looking to hire four slots.

 

  1. Award Contract – Recycling Disposal Contract

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the recycling industry has changed and it has been dictated by the situation in China and the enforcement of quality standards which has changed the entire industry.  Due to this downturn, the traditional floor price contract has been replaced with a Revenue Share model.  This model is new to the Village of Ridgewood.  The Village recycling processor, Atlantic Coast Fibers has chosen to exercise their contractual right and did not permit the next annual extension of our floor price contract.  Due to the change in market conditions, ACF has requested that the Village move into the new Revenue Share contract.

Ed Bethune, Supervisor of Recycling, sought out alternatives for disposal and revaluated the details of the new contract.  In his research, he found it was most secure for the Village to contract with one of the big two receiving facilities, ACF or Waste Management.  They are the two largest and most reputable recycling processors of municipal material.  It would not be in the Village’s interest to entertain proposals from smaller, unstable firms that may not be able to stay afloat during this turbulent time in the industry. 

Based on this research, and with the concurrence of Mr. Calbi, they have decided to pursue a contract with ACF.  They presented the Village with a more advantageous pricing model for Revenue Share, based on the quality of our material and were favorable when compared to the cost share proposed by Waste Management.  Therefore, Mr. Calbi recommends awarding a three year contract with two one-year options with ACF out of Passaic.  In accordance with statute the marketing of recyclable materials recovered through a recycling program, can be negotiated and awarded without public advertising for bids.

Councilman Sedon asked if there were any projections about the change in revenue.  Mr. Calbi stated that it is definitely going to affect the revenue stream.  There may even be months where the Village has to pay, but they have to realize that recycling keeps the waste out of the solid waste stream and that has a much higher cost to dispose.  They did an analysis over the past few years of what they saved through recycling as opposed to putting it in the waste stream and over those years they have saved $1.7 million in five years by recycling in the Village.  Although they may be negative in this revenue share a few months they are saving in the end because it’s not going into garbage.  This Revenue Share model means they will give the Village the actual price that they are getting or paying and then subtract out of that a processing fee.  Because of our quality of recycling, percentages in each basket, they are beneficial to the Village in terms of percentages.  Compared to the other municipalities, the Village’s percentages are better and the advantage of ACF is that they allow a percentage of waste as opposed to refusing a load and charging a surcharge.  Mr. Calbi added that they have been talking about this for four years and it is up to the national leaders as to how they are going to negotiate those contracts.

Mr. Bethune stated that there is a misconception that recycling was meant to be a revenue maker, it was meant to pull monies away from the solid waste stream to cut back on solid waste.  Recyclables are solid waste but they found ways to reuse recyclables and over the years it has been a very valid commodity, but that has changed.  We have to change our mindset, so to pay a little now to get rid of recycling.  Councilman Sedon stated that he agreed with that, but after so many years you get used to the revenue stream so that was one of the concerns.  He asked when the contract would go into effect.  Mr. Bethune stated August 1st.  Councilman Sedon asked if that would impact this year’s budget or did they project less based on what they felt was coming.  Mr. Bethune stated that they are still ahead of the game and it isn’t going to be that detrimental because the products are very clean and that is the main staple to make sure that we stay ahead of the contamination.  Waste Management looks for zero contamination in the recyclables and there is no such thing, whereas ACF offers 5% contamination and we can deal with that.

Councilman Voigt asked if they anticipated a huge deviation from what was projected in the budget.  Mr. Calbi stated that what would be most likely affected is what is in the recycling trust and they would gain or lose on what comes out of this contract.  Councilman Voigt asked for an approximation of what was in that trust.  Mr. Calbi stated that he guesses it was about $100,000, which is a surplus but is also part of their grant funding from the State.  Councilman Voigt asked if it would affect the budget.  Mr. Calbi stated that he would consult Mr. Rooney and get an answer for next week.

Mr. Bethune shared an article with the Village Council.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked about the acceptable comingled common contents and the dual stream recycling, if that changes the items going into recycling from this company and if there was anything to get out to the public.  Mr. Bethune stated that every day is a constant reeducation.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if there was any information to get out regarding the new vendor.  Mr. Bethune stated that they have the recycle app which they try to keep current with the market, they keep the calendar, and when you come to the recycling center there is a big sign with green for yes and red for no, so they are trying to send out flyers and stay on top of things.  Mr. Calbi stated that they need the public to keep the quality high, keeping it clean and dry as the moisture factor of paper and cardboard is important.  The processors at the facility check the moisture content, and he asked if they can wait for the next pickup or bring it to the recycling center on a day that is raining it would be beneficial.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that was important, as if it was raining her whole neighborhood could be effect.  Mr. Bethune stated that not necessarily, as they probe the moisture and there might be a certain percentage that they would have to be charged and it might not be the whole load, but these are new things that they are just finding out and they are coming up with ways to get it out to the public.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that education is important as she might not necessarily think of that.

Councilman Sedon stated that regarding REAC or any group to help out, to let them know.  Mr. Calbi stated that they need a champion and someone to help out because they have the app and did a newsletter in addition to the green guide and need more avenues to get out to the public and the businesses downtown.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that social media is the place to be with this as so many people are following this and they get information out to thousands of people in seconds, so maybe that is a place that they need to look.  Mr. Bethune stated that they have a Facebook page, to which Mr. Calbi added that there are less than 100 followers so they need to find a way to get that out more.

 

  1. Policy

 

  1. Planning Board Proposed Ordinance to Amend Code – Swimming Pools

 

Ms. Mailander stated that Chapter 190 of The Code of the Village of Ridgewood references Chapter 251.  Chapter 251 is actually reserved and there is nothing there.  The new ordinance would amend the Village Code to remove all references to Chapter 251 and replace it with the appropriate reference.

 

  1. Planning Board Proposed Ordinance to Amend Code – Permit Real Estate Open House Signs

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this would allow under Chapter 190 at Section 190-122H(7)(h) to permit a free standing real estate open house sign for a period not to exceed five days, which they don’t permit right now.

 

  1. Operations

 

  1. Calendar Themes

 

Ms. Mailander stated that in June they brought two possible calendar themes, one was “Hidden and Not So Hidden Treasures of the Village of Ridgewood” and the other was line artwork for native species throughout the Village.  The Village Council was provided examples of each.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she has no opinion about this, other than the effort to have the calendar done by June so that they don’t have errors and omissions.  She added that her only motivation is to have this done for proofreading.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that she liked the “Hidden and Not So Hidden Treasures of the Village of Ridgewood” as it was a great way for people to see something and to go visit it and it gives them an idea.  Mayor Hache and Councilman Voigt were in agreement.  Councilman Sedon stated that the picture quality is probably going to be similar to what was provided so he liked the idea of having information and the line art.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that short of taking the photos out, they are always going to look muddy in this which was the reasoning behind the line art.  Councilman Sedon added that his concern was getting it done right.  Mayor Hache added that he liked the “Hidden and Not So Hidden Treasures of the Village of Ridgewood” idea.

Ms. Mailander stated that they would do the “Hidden and Not So Hidden Treasures of the Village of Ridgewood” so anyone who was listening let them know as soon as possible if they have any treasures in Ridgewood and they can highlight them in a particular month.  Councilman Voigt asked if they wanted them to send pictures.  Ms. Mailander stated that would be fine but they could also just share the location.

 

  1. Proposed Encroachment Agreement – Minor Retaining Wall

 

Ms. Mailander stated that a resident on East Ridgewood Avenue wanted to repair a low retaining wall, but as they went through the permitting process it was discovered to be in the Village’s right of way.  It is a very minimal encroachment so a resolution of approval is needed. 

 

  1. Memorandum of Understanding – Childhood Lead Program – Health Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the State of New Jersey has recently lowered the action level for lead poisoning investigation from 10 ug/dl to 5 ug/dl which has caused an increase in lead investigation cases.  The Bergen County Department of Health Services was able to obtain a grant from the state which enables the County to provide lead poisoning services to all 70 towns within the County.  This agreement is valid for 24 months, from 07/01/2019 to 06/30/2022.  If the County is successful in meeting the goals of the grant requirements, it will likely continue.

The County has drafted a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for all Bergen County towns.  They ask that it be signed within 30 days of the original agreement which is July 1, 2019.  They need a resolution to sign that memorandum.  The Village used to have an MOU with the Paterson Health Department, and those cases will continue until close out, but all other cases will go to Bergen County.

 

  1. Request for Emergency Grant for Community Development – SHARE House

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was a request for an emergency Community Development Block Grant for the replacement of two central air conditioning units at the Prospect Street SHARE House, which requires an endorsing resolution from the Village Council.  The cost is $22,700.   This confirms endorsing of the project and doesn’t obligate any of the Village’s funds.

 

  1. Authorize Shared Services Agreement – Intersection Improvements (Bergen County)

 

Ms. Mailander stated that she received an email last week that indicated that Bergen County is willing to move forward with a Shared Services Agreement to improve the intersections of North Maple and Franklin, Franklin and Oak, and Franklin and Walnut, and Broad.  They are going to move forward with that and pass this resolution.  The Freeholders have adopted a resolution already; will prepare a Shared Services Agreement, and then move forward from there.  The County indicated that the faster that the Village can complete its requirements, the more likely that it will get done.  Their goal is to move forward to get these improvements to the intersections done.

  1. REVIEW OF JULY 17, 2019 PUBLIC MEETING AGENDA

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was a review of the July 17, 2019 Public Meeting Agenda.

There are no Proclamations.

There are no ordinances for introduction or public hearing for Ridgewood Water.

Resolutions for Ridgewood Water include: Title 59 Approval – Infrared Asphalt Surface Repair, Trench Patching, and Miscellaneous Curb and Sidewalk Repair; Award Contract – Infrared Asphalt Surface Repair, Trench Patching, and Miscellaneous Curb and Sidewalk Repair; Award Contract Under State Contract – Service Truck Chassis; Award Contract Under State Contract Utility Body; Authorize Additional Award of Contract – Resurfacing and Repair at Water Utility Locations; Award Professional Engineering Services Contract – Farview and Eastside Station Improvements; Award Change Order #1 – Professional Services Contract – Engineering Services – Eder, Lakeview and Southside Pump Station; Award Change Order #1 – Professional Engineering Services – Passaic Valley Water Commission Pipeline Project; Authorize Additional Award of Contract – Line Stop and Valve Insertion; and Declare Property Surplus – Water Department.

The following ordinances are scheduled for introduction:  3728  - Designate Parking Spaces in Train Station Lot for Hudson Street Lot Permit Holders; 3729 – Amend Chapter 190 – Land Use Development – Swimming Pools; 3730 – Amend Chapter 190 – Land Use and Development – Permit Real Estate Open House Signs.

The scheduled public hearings include: 3723 – Amend Outdoor Café Fees – 2019 & 2020; 3724 – Amend Chapter 154 – Update FEMA/FIRM Maps – Flood Damage Prevention; 3725 – Reappropriate Funding in Capital Ordinance – Renovation of Tree Wells in Central Business District to Conducting a Tree Inventory; 3726 – Ridgewood Parking Permits for Building Owners with Offices in Central Business District; and 3727 – Amend Chapter 145 – Fees – Ridgewood Parking Permits.

Resolutions include: Award Contract – Vehicle Tracking Equipment; Title 59 Approval – Hazardous Material Remediation – Zabriskie Schedler House; Award Contract – Hazardous Material Remediation – Zabriskie Schedler House; Award Contract Under Sourcewell National Cooperative Purchasing Program – 2019 Ford F350 Pickup Truck – Signal Division; Award Contract Under Sourcewell National Cooperative Purchasing Program – 2020 Kenworth Packer Body Truck – Division of Solid Waste; Award Contract – Recycling Disposal Contract; Award Professional Services Contract – Planner for Affordable Housing Matters; Award Professional Services Contract – Village Auditor; Amend Resolution for Award of Contract Under Houston-Galveston Area Council Cooperative Purchasing Program – 2020 Pierce Saber Pumper; Reject Bids – Restoration and Renovation of Zabriskie Schedler House; Authorize Shared Services Agreement – Snowplowing (Bergen County); Authorize Shared Services Agreement – Intersection Improvements (Bergen County); Establish Annual Service Charge and Payment for Guarantee Bond for Ridgewood Senior Citizen Housing Corporation and Guaranty of Payment of Revenue Bonds; Endorse Community Development Block Grant – SHARE, Inc. – Prospect Street House – Emergency Repair to Central Air Conditioning Units; Authorize Minor Encroachment Agreement – 970 East Ridgewood Avenue; Authorize Release of Escrow – Flo’s Market; Authorize Execution of NJDEP Permits – Drainage of Kings Pond; Declare Property Surplus – Department of Public Works; Declare Property Surplus – Fire Department; Authorize Memorandum of Understanding with Bergen County Department of Health Services – Childhood Lead Program; and Authorize Removal of Diseased Trees at Memorial Park at Van Neste Square.

The Village Council was in favor of accepting the RBSA donation at Upper Hawes that was discussed this evening.

 

  1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

Boyd Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that he spoke about this last year, but the subject came up again that although Graydon is wonderful, an improvement could be made when the pool is closed so people could be notified before having to drive over.  Last year he asked about the control panel to the Lightening Detection System or if a notice could be put on the Village website, but Mr. Hansen indicated that was not possible.  He asked if a cheap webcam could be put outside Graydon pointed at the flagpole so that you could look from your home on the website and get a visual of what flag is flying.  For parents or grandparents with children it is difficult to pile everyone in the car and get there to find out that the flag is red because the detection system has gone off.

Mr. Loving stated that he had some of the same concerns regarding Kensington as some of the Village Council.  The gentlemen asked if the Village could consider a pilot program, which seemed like something for a hospital or not for profit.  He didn’t understand what benefit this company brings to the Village that they would want to enter into a pilot program rather than pay the taxes that are due based on the building.

Mr. Loving added that he is not a fan of these open house signs, and asked why they should be out for five days.  Generally they have open houses on Sunday, so a sign could be placed the Monday prior.  He added that it is visual pollution that we just don’t need.  He added that an ordinance would have to word carefully as some corners are going to have multiple signs up every day of the week.

There were no additional comments from the public.

Mayor Hache stated that regarding the open house signs, the ordinance doesn’t contemplate the signs on the right of way but on the property themselves.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that most of those are the top pieces on the property, not in the right of way.  That rider increased the actual size of the sign.  Ms. Mailander stated that the ordinance states that a sign saying open house could be added onto the top of the sign, however, it also says that it cannot exceed five days in total during the time of the sign permit which is 30 days.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it was discussed last year if Graydon is closed, could they have a banner on the website or something if Parks and Recreation knows that Graydon is closing for the day it should be easy enough to post that on the website to alert people.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would talk to Dylan Hansen.  She added that she thought there were emails sent out to members, but apparently it’s not if they are closed during the day due to lightening.  Councilwoman Knudsen suggested a text message.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would find out.

  1. ADJOURNMENT

 

There being no further business to come before the Village Council, on a motion by Councilwoman Knudsen, seconded by Councilman Voigt, and carried unanimously by voice vote, the Village Council’s Work Session was adjourned at 9:53 P.M.

______________________________

                                                                                                  Ramon M. Hache, Sr.                                  

                                                                                                            Mayor                                      

______________________________

              Donna M. Jackson

           Deputy Village Clerk

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A REGULAR WORK SESSION OF THE VILLAGE COUNCIL OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD HELD IN THE SYDNEY V. STOLDT, JR. COURT ROOM OF THE RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE HALL, 131 NORTH MAPLE AVENUE, RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY ON JUNE 26, 2019 AT 7:30 P.M.

 

  1. CALL TO ORDER – OPEN PUBLIC MEETINGS ACT – ROLL CALL – FLAG    SALUTE

Mayor Hache called the meeting to order at 7:30 P.M. and read the Statement of Compliance with the Open Public Meetings Act.  At roll call the following were present: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache.  Also present were Donna Jackson, Deputy Village Clerk; Chris Rutishauser, Village Engineer; and Rich Calbi, present in the absence of Village Manager Heather Mailander.

Mayor Hache led those in attendance in the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag as well as in a Moment of Silence to honor the brave men and women serving in our armed forces and all our first responders.

  1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

Douglas Wolmsley, 119 Monte Vista Avenue, stated that at the Village Council Work Session on May 22nd he raised the issue of all day commuter parking on the designated section of Monte Vista Avenue between Heights Road and Monroe Street.  He thanked the Village Council for their attention, adding that at the Village Council meeting on June 5th, Sergeant Chuck and Mr. Rutishauser reviewed the matter and shared their findings.  He added that he was in agreement with their suggestion of three hour parking, adding that multiple commuter parking on that section continues through today.

Mr. Wolmsley added that the issue of multiple commuter cars on that section of Monte Vista continues even through today.  Since that meeting, they received a letter from Mr. Rutishauser suggesting a four hour limit, and he would support that proposal.  He added that he has a slight preference for a three hour restriction due to Park Slope currently having a three hour restriction.  This addresses the crux of their issue which is all day commuter parking on that section of Monte Vista.  He added that he would submit his comments in writing to Mr. Rutishauser.

Patricia Smesko, 89 Monte Vista Avenue, stated that her section of Monte Vista has no parking from 7:00 A.M. to 11:00 A.M., which isn’t working because people are still parking there and she is then forced to call the Village and they are then ticketed.  Sometimes they park at 10:00 A.M. and then can park all day long.  She added that people are parking on Heights as well as Madison, Monte Vista, and Sheridan.  People fly down Heights Road very fast also and there are cars parked on both sides of the street creating a narrow passageway.  Ms. Smesko added that in the Village, there are empty spots at the new spots in the Train Station and suggested that they find parking there.  

Michelle Bors, 138 Monte Vista Avenue, stated that she was in favor of the parking restrictions as she sees the commuter parking every day, and when the landscaping trucks come to do work it creates a very narrow throughway.  She added that Monte Vista has become a cut-through for a lot of people and it makes it very dangerous.  There are no sidewalks, so you have to go into the street to walk up to Heights and with parking on both sides it becomes a dangerous situation.

Pamela Perron, 123 Kenilworth Road, stated that a year or two ago she was walking on the corner of Kenilworth and Spring and an accident happened right in front of her.  There was discussion afterwards about making the intersection of Kenilworth and Spring into a four-way stop, but she gathered that because of Sergeant Chuck’s or Mr. Rutishauser’s evaluation it wasn’t appropriate to put a four way stop there.  There is a brand new stop sign in the roadway that is three or four feet round, and drivers coming down Kenilworth can’t possibly miss the sign.  She added that it is a very good solution.  The pedestrian perspective is that from twenty feet away its invisible, so you don’t get the signage pollution from down the street.  Ms. Perron added that it was a solution that she would like to see elsewhere in Ridgewood.

Danielle Flynn, 146 Monte Vista Avenue, stated that she would support measures to eliminate the commuter parking Monday through Friday.  She added that she hoped restrictions would not be on the weekend as that would only be effecting residents.  She wondered if the Village Council would consider some sort of placard they could put on their cars if they had workers there during the week or needed to park on the street during the day.

There were no additional comments from the public.

Mayor Hache asked if placards were something that had been implemented in the Village previously.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that placards or stickers for a particular neighborhood becomes a problem of enforcement.  This is an issue raised by residents over the years and is a popular request but he deferred to the Village Council.  Mayor Hache suggested that it was something to look into.  Mr. Rutishauser added that the ordinance that he notified the residents that is for a four hour limit, which the Police Department felt was a limit that allows a landscaper to service a lawn, delivery people to come and go, and is only from 7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.

Mayor Hache asked about the Stop sign decal that was installed.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they have installed one of the two decals, which are thermoplastic, and they will install the other on the northbound direction of Kenilworth.  He was glad to hear from a resident about the stop sign decal, and added that it was another tool in the toolbox and it was important to mix it up for motorists.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked about the location on Monte Vista that is currently 7:00 A.M. to 11:00 A.M. and whether the Parking Enforcement Officers in the interim could check that area and start to enforce.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that he would put that request in to Sergeant Chuck.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if Mr. Rutishauser could explain the reason the four way stop sign could not be placed at the Kenilworth and Spring intersection.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that four way stop signs are a traffic control device, however, it needs to meet a number of warrants that the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control requires.  Right now they did not find any warrants that would support a four way stop intersection, but things change over time and they would continue to work with the Police Department in case anything changes in the future.

  1. MANAGERS REPORT

Village Council Work Session – Mr. Rutishauser stated that the next Village Council Work Session is scheduled for Wednesday, July 10th at 7:30 P.M. in the Court Room.

Train Station Parking Lot – Mr. Rutishauser stated that the expansion of the Train Station parking lot is almost complete.  The striping was completed last Saturday, and it is open and ready to be used.

Fourth of July Celebration – Mr. Rutishauser stated that Fourth of July Celebrations would be underway next week.  If residents would like to put out chairs they are welcome to.  The parade is from 10:00 A.M. to noon, and the celebration continues on Veterans Field where the gates open at 6:00 P.M. and there is music and fireworks.  The sale of tickets is critical to support the cost of the event.  Tickets are available for sale at Bookends, Backyard Living, Connect One Bank, the Daily Treat, Goffle Brook Farms, Hillman Electric, Town and Country, and The Wine Cellar.  Fireworks tickets and the 50/50 tickets are also available for purchase at the Ridgewood Public Library and at the Farmers Market.  Advanced tickets are $10 each for ages 6 and up, ticket prices increase at the gate to $15 for adults and $10 for children ages 6 to 12.  Children five and under are admitted for free.  Firework tickets are required for entry to Vets Field.  Donation and ticket information is available at RidgewoodJulyFourth.com.

Dog Licenses – Mr. Rutishauser stated that dog licenses are due for renewal in the month of June, and after July 1st a $20 late fee will be charged.  Dog owners were reminded by mail and email to fill out the form, enclose a check and mail it into the Health Department.  The Health Department is open from 8:30 A.M. to 4:30 P.M., Monday through Friday if residents have any questions related to dog licensing or other health matters related to your dog.

Farmers Market – Mr. Rutishauser stated that the Farmers Market is open for the 2019 season, on Sunday, June 23rd.  It is open every Sunday through October 22nd on the West Side of the Train Station from 9:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M.  He encouraged people to come and meet the farmers, in addition there is a Jam Man, Bella Mozzarella, Pickelicious, Bounty Bakery.  The Ridgewood Farmers Market is a real farmers market and is brought to us by the members of the Ridgewood Chamber of Commerce.

Ridgewood Recreation Day Camp – Mr. Rutishauser stated that Ridgewood Recreation Day Camp began yesterday, and has over 400 children participating from grade 1 through 6.  Lots of fun and special events are planned for this summer.

Ridgewood Guild Art in the Park – Mr. Rutishauser stated that the Ridgewood Guild is sponsoring Art in the Park evenings Friday, July 12th and August 2nd.  Take a stroll in the park and enjoy artwork and music.  Art is for sale those evenings with proceeds benefitting the Ridgewood Guild.

Graydon Pool – Mr. Rutishauser reminded everyone that Graydon Pool is open for the summer season, with weekend hours from 10:00 A.M. to 7:30 P.M.  Weekday hours are noon to 7:30 P.M. Residents can purchase memberships in person at the pool office or a ridgewoodnj.net/communitypass.  Various program offerings and amenities include spray fountains, Adirondack chairs, a shade system, recreational game area, picnic area with tables and charcoal grills Wi-Fi accessibility, the Waterside Café from noon to 7:00 P.M., swim lessons, story time under the pavilion, a lending library, and special events include movie nights, concerts and more.

Kasschau Memorial Shell – Mr. Rutishauser stated that the Kasschau Memorial Shell located on Veterans Field behind the Library, provides free live concert popular music concerts on Tuesday and Thursday nights at 8:30 P.M. in June, July and August.  Bring a chair or a blanket and enjoy these concerts under the stars.  This program is presented due to the generous sponsorship of several local businesses and the Village of Ridgewood.  The Senior Bus will be available for transportation to several of these performances.  If you are an older resident and wish to go to one of these performances, please call 201-670-5500 extension 203 for details and for which performances they will have the bus available. Front row lawn chairs are provided by Age Friendly Ridgewood for the bus riders.

 

Ridgewood Guild – Mr. Rutishauser stated that the Ridgewood Guild provides Movies Under the Stars on Wednesday nights twice a month in June, July, and August in Memorial Park at Van Neste Square at sundown.  This summer they will be showing Chicago on July 10th, Sleepless in Seattle on July 24th, The Sixth Sense on August 2nd, and ET on August 21st.  Bring a chair or a blanket and enjoy the show.

 

Parking in Village-Owned Lots after 3:00 P.M. – Mr. Rutishauser reminded residents that parking in all Village-owned parking lots after 3:00 P.M. does not require a permit.  There are still time restrictions of three hours and parking fees are still in effect.

 

Mayors Wellness Festival – Mr. Rutishauser stated that the Mayors Wellness Festival is slated for Sunday, September 22nd from 11:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. in Memorial Park at Van Neste Square.  All local health, fitness and wellness providers are welcome, contact the Parks and Recreation office for further information.

 

  1. COUNCIL REPORTS

Ridgewood Environmental Advisory Committee – Councilman Sedon stated that the Ridgewood Environmental Advisory Committee and the Green Team met last week and are coming up with a plan to educate residents about the single use plastic bag ban and will hopefully finalize it by the next meeting in July and will start rolling it out in July and August and kick it in for the Fall months leading into the winter when there is more activity in town.

Planning Board – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that Planning Board meets next Tuesday at 7:30 P.M.

 

Fourth of July Committee – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the 50/50 tickets will be available also at MacMurphy’s July 3rd in the evening from 6:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.  50/50 tickets have been $100 apiece and they have sold up to 600 over past years, this year they have reduced the price to $20, and the tickets will also be available on the field which will allow the committee to sell more tickets.  If there is anybody who is interested in tickets you can visit Ridgewood July 4th website and there is information on how to reach Tara Masterson.  E-Tickets are available for the field as well, and she encouraged everyone to purchase a 50/50 ticket, consider making a donation, and be reminded that this is an all-volunteer program as a 501(c)3 organization.  She thanked everyone who continues to volunteer and donate to make this event a great success year after year.

State Library Grant Applications – Councilwoman Walsh stated that granting applications for the State Library Grant is coming out on July 1st, they will have 60 days to review and send questions back, and then thereafter they will do the grant application.  The Library did a video that they will submit for everyone to see via social media to give everyone a better idea of the process and why this grant application is going to be filled out by the Library.  This will give the public the opportunity to give some feedback.

 

Citizen Safety Advisory Committee – Councilman Voigt stated that the Citizen Safety Advisory Committee met last Thursday.

Next Monday, Councilman Voigt and Mayor Hache will be meeting with residents to discuss parking issues in and around Sherman Place.  Starbucks continues to be an issue as the cones are not a deterrent.  The mid center lane being considered between Oak and Cottage will be presented to the County.  The Village will also be extending the sidewalk on Hillcrest past Heights on the south side of West Glen this summer, as well as on the north side of West Glen towards Monroe.  They examined some of the issues with cars speeding in the lawns section, and Engineering is considering installing island marking and the Village will be looking at installing a school bus stop on Newcomb Road.

Councilman Voigt stated that Jane Reymus, as part of the Stop, Look and Wave Organization has been working with the schools to find safe places to drop off students in the morning, such that they can cross the streets easily and the cars don’t create traffic around the schools.

Maypole and Mid-Summer Celebration – Mayor Hache stated that last week there was a Maypole and Mid-Summer celebration in the children’s sensory and butterfly garden at the Stable.  He thanked the Ridgewood Conservancy for Public Land for hosting, as well as Apiarist Frank Mortimer and his wife Sophie, and the Parks and Recreation Department for hosting this event as part of National Pollinators Week.  He congratulated Frank Mortimer for being recently appointed to the Parks and Recreation Conservation Board and thanked him for stepping up to volunteer and serve. 

 

Central Business District Advisory Committee – Mayor Hache stated that CBDAC met on June 13th and was looking into how business improvement districts work, and whether it was something for the Village Council to consider exploring.  They also spoke with a representative who will be designing a new website for the Central Business District.

Chamber of Commerce – Mayor Hache stated that on June 18th, he and Councilman Voigt attended the Chamber of Commerce 92nd Annual Dinner and swore in the new slate of officers.  There were several individuals honored at the event as well, including the owners of Jekyll and Hyde with the Community Business Award.  Life Opportunities Unlimited received the Community Service Award.  The College Club also received the Community Giving Award. 

Mayor Hache congratulated the new Board of Directors, with Scott Leif continuing as President.

RHS Class of 2019 – Mayor Hache stated that on June 20th, the Village Councilmembers attended the Ridgewood High School Class of 2019 Graduation and it was a beautiful celebration.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked about the school bus stop on Newcomb Road.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that he wasn’t clear if it was a Ridgewood Board of Education bus stop or if it was a private school bus stop, but they were going to investigate signage as a resident brought to their attention that there were also some sight issues.

 

  1. DISCUSSION

 

  1. Budget

 

  1. Declare Property Surplus – Fire Department

 

Mr. Rutishauser stated that there was a resolution for the Village Council’s consideration to declare a piece of Fire Department apparatus surplus so that it can be traded in against the purchase of their new piece of equipment.

 

  1. Operations

 

  1. Appointment to Parks Recreation Conservation Board

 

Mr. Rutishauser stated that there were a number of residents who were being appointed to the Parks, Recreation and Conservation Board.

 

Councilman Sedon made a motion to suspend the Work Session and convene a Special Public Meeting.  Councilwoman Knudsen seconded the motion.

Roll Call Vote

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        None

ABSTAIN:      None

 

  1. SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETING - SEE SEPARATE MINUTES

Mayor Hache called for a motion to adjourn, there was a motion by Councilman Sedon to adjourn the Special Public Meeting and reconvene the Work Session.   Councilwoman Knudsen seconded the motion.

Roll Call Vote

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        None

ABSTAIN:      None

 

  1. DISCUSSION

 

  1. Ridgewood Water

 

  1. Award Change Order #1 – Professional Services for Engineering Consultant for Eder, Lakeview and Southside Pump Stations

 

Mr. Calbi stated that this is the first change order for this professional services contract with D.J. Egarian & Associates for $6,000, bringing the contract total to $103,000.  The change is necessary due to the need to upgrade the power service at the property that was not originally anticipated.  There is a redesign associated with that upgrade and for the engineer to coordinate with Orange and Rockland who is the utility provider in Wyckoff at this location.

 

  1. Award Change Order #1 – Professional Services for Engineering Consulting for Passaic Valley Water Commission Pipeline Project

 

Mr. Calbi stated that this is the first change order on a different design project with Suburban Consulting Engineers who was hired to design the Passaic Valley Water Commission pipeline interconnection.  They had to move a stream crossing on Harristown Road in Fair Lawn, and now will be crossing an open cut matter instead of a trenchless matter which requires permits from the NJDEP.  This change order for $10,000 is necessary for that permit work.

Councilman Voigt asked if the permit was $10,000.  Mr. Calbi stated that it was for preparing and submitting the permit.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if that was something that should have been anticipated.  Mr. Calbi stated that the design document and RFP had planned to go trenchless, but they had to move to the other side and found it was more cost effective to go open cut because otherwise they would have to acquire property.

 

  1. Additional Award Contract – Line Stop and Valve Insertion

 

Mr. Calbi stated that this is a two year service contract that was awarded in 2017 for 2018 and 2019.  They recommended and the Village Council did approve an award not to exceed $100,000 for this year’s services.  They exceeded that amount already this year due to the number of water main breaks.  They are looking to add an additional amount to the not to exceed and they pay based on the original prices that were in the original bid.

Councilman Voigt asked what it meant that they were having a lot of emergency main breaks.  Mr. Calbi stated that they are doing a lot of maintenance on the system as a result of the Water Quality Accountability Act they are now required to turn the valves on a five year rotation, as a result of that many of the valves break.  There was an issue Memorial Day Weekend with three breaks in a row as a result of some maintenance and paving work.  Councilman Voigt asked how an emergency main break happens.  Mr. Calbi stated that the system in many areas is as old as 100 years.  So, the pipes deteriorate as a result of soil conditions, or material wears or the soil may corrode it, or they get water hammer, or the valves break off and water comes out of the ground.  They are forced to put in insertion valves to control and isolate that break to avoid shutting down hundreds of homes.  The cost is worth avoiding that nuisance, and these are long lasting, so in the event there is an issue in that area, they have better control and can last for 50 years.

Councilwoman Walsh asked about the initial $100,000 and the additional $150,000.  Mr. Calbi stated that the original contract had no total, so they arbitrarily picked an amount.  There is no telling what is going to happen each year in terms of emergencies.  They are looking at what is going to happen this year based on what has happened already, and they don’t want to come back with additional work toward the end of the year.  Finance will give a purchase order in parts, and when that is utilized they get another piece.  Councilwoman Walsh asked if they had completed everything that was planned and were doing additional work.  Mr. Calbi stated that was correct.  They had done above what was planned.

 

  1. Declare Property Surplus – 2004 Ford F250

 

Mr. Calbi stated that this vehicle has already been replaced but has been sitting around, so they could finally declare it surplus and sell it on GovDeals.

 

  1. Parking – None

 

  1. Budget

 

  1. Ridgewood Senior Citizen Housing Corporation

 

Mr. Rutishauser stated that MaryJo Gilmour, Tax Collector, created a resolution for the Village Council’s consideration because they are exempt from property taxes and have a payment in lieu of taxes.

 

  1. Declare Property Surplus – Parking Meter Housings and Mechanisms – Department of Public Works

 

Mr. Rutishauser stated that Traffic and Signal has been removing a lot of the individual and duplex meter housings with the implementation of multi-space meters, which are new surplus.  They will declare them surplus and then seek to sell them anyway possible, and it is just the housings not the mechanisms.

 

  1. Award Contract – Vehicle Tracking Equipment

 

Mr. Rutishauser stated that this is a program that has been initiated by Mr. Calbi and they have found this to be very successful.  It has been used for a lot of the Public Works Departments processes, and can be utilized to see the frequency of plowing and leaf collection on a street.  It also helps in enforcement if they clean a street they know when it was done in collaboration with the Code Enforcer’s operations.

Councilwoman Walsh asked if the unions are aware of this and if it conforms to the Human Resources Manual.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that the unions are aware of it, not necessarily which units have the mechanisms which is strictly in managements hands.  The units are also programmed for a geofence, so that if a vehicle leaves a designated area, an alarm would be sent to the responsible Director so that they can see any activity.  They have had a discussion with all unions and they are fully aware of it.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked from a blue collar union perspective, do they appreciate that as in a way it is a benefit.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that the detriment in the staff’s eyes is that they feel that big brother is watching them, and in the eyes of management they see it as providing a value to the taxpayers and they can immediately take an action to inform the operator of that vehicle that they are off task.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if the GPS would provide information as to how much time was spent in a specific area.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they do have features to tell if a vehicle is idling or is parked.  Employees are allowed to go pick up a lunch but can’t spend three hours doing so.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she was thinking how long it takes somebody to collect garbage in a specific area, from an efficiency perspective.  Mr. Calbi stated that right now they are looking to complete the fleet, as it is on 70 vehicles and they would like to get it on the remaining 50.  They could export the route data as it shows the track of the vehicle over time and they can put it on a map and see how long it takes each route and then decide that maybe there was something they could change.  They can also see the speed of the vehicle, to confirm whether the vehicle is speeding.

 

  1. Release of Escrow – Flo’s Market

 

Mr. Rutishauser stated that Flo’s Market is the vendor for the concession stand in the Train Station.  Due to the economics of the operation, there is a lower yield to the Village and rent that they are paying so there is an excess amount of escrow being held by the Village and they are asking that it be refunded.

  1. Policy – None

 

  1. Operations

 

  1. Memorial Park at Van Neste Square – Village Tree Assessment

 

Declan Madden, Village of Ridgewood Certified Tree Expert, stated that on June 12th he performed an inspection at Memorial Park at Van Neste Square and seven trees were in bad shape and need to be removed.  Four ash trees, two oak, and one Norway maple.  Upon inspection it was decided that they need to be removed.  Since it was such a large amount of trees in one particular area, they put it before the Village Council to consider it. 

Councilman Voigt asked if there was a problem with the area that was causing this.  Mr. Madden stated that the ash trees have ash yellow or ash decline that is a disease that messes up the vascular system of the tree and interrupts the tissue underneath the bark which stops the trees ability to take nutrients and water out of the soil.  The oak and the maple have structural problems like large cavities and defects in the stem that could cause the trees to break out in a storm.  Councilman Voigt asked how old the trees are.  Mr. Madden stated that the oaks are probably 100 years old, the ash are younger, and the Norway maple is probably 50 to 60 years old.  He also provided pictures to the Village Council.  Mr. Madden stated that the ash trees need to be taken down quickly because they are in the worst shape.

Councilwoman Walsh asked if he would make a recommendation to plant new trees in that area.  Mr. Madden stated that right now there are no plans to replant, but he was just there to speak about the removals.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if it was overcrowded in that area in his opinion.  Mr. Madden stated that when they remove the trees he doesn’t think it is going to be a huge impact because there are trees flanking the corners.  Councilman Voigt asked if they would remove the trees as a town or contract this out.  Mr. Madden stated that they would do it in-house.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked when they were planning to take them down.  Mr. Madden stated that they were booked out but would try to do it as soon as possible in the interest of public safety.  Councilman Voigt asked if they were to put other trees there, would they thrive.  Mr. Madden stated that proper trees selected for that area would be fine.

Mr. Rutishauser asked if Mr. Madden could comment on ash bore as the report said that none was evident there.  Mr. Madden stated that there was none evident there, but they did get positive detection on the 500 section of Wyndemere.  Those trees have been positively detected.  The bore when it exits the tree leaves exit holes, and there are none.  There is also no woodpecker damage or bark splitting, so there is no indication that it has it at this time.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked who owned the trees that are afflicted.  Mr. Madden stated that they are Vilage trees.  Mr. Rutishauser added that he has seen the trees and the great majority that are in poor shape are in the public right of way.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if Mr. Madden has availability if it is a public safety issue, why do they need a resolution to remove the trees.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they do a lot of resolutions for actions so the Village Council can express their voice, and in public works a lot of residents come up and ask what they are doing.  With a resolution in hand, it helps explain that the governing body is fully aware of the actions being taken.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that if it is a public safety issue and he has availability, Mr. Madden could remove the tree in the interest of public safety before the meeting if necessary.

 

  1. Authorize Execution of NJDEP Permits for Draining of Kings Pond

 

Mr. Rutishauser stated that they are currently in the fish salvage operation phase, and that has necessitated about three or four additional permits with NJDEP and they all need a signature.  They have a tight timeframe to do the actual dredging with the County.  Councilman Voigt asked where they put the fish.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they are getting relocated to Gypsy Pond.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked what happened with the carp.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that the carp were killed, as the NJDEP considers them an invasive species and the NJDEP has deemed them not to be repopulated.

 

  1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

Boyd Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that beginning on June 24th weekdays the pool opens at 10:00 A.M. to 7:30 P.M. through August 14th.

Mr. Loving added that there was a comment made about available parking at the Train Station and he observed the same thing, noting that there were more than two dozen spaces and on another day more than a dozen available spaces.  He added that perhaps the reason the lot isn’t filling up is because there are no permit holders to fill it up. So, maybe a good idea would be to open up additional permits and prorate them for the year as those spaces may remain unused unless additional permits are offered.  He added that if the spaces don’t fill and people aren’t going to buy permits, have they reached the saturation point with parking and enough parking for commuters, and should they rethink things that are going to happen down the road.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that by design those spaces that are underutilized, as the garage build moves forward, the cars that are displaced is the exact number that is in that train station lot.  So rather than do the ride share and upset the residents routine, they are going to be able to use their Hudson Street Parking Pass and move over to the train station lot during those months.  The open spaces presently serve an important purpose so that they don’t inconvenience the permit holders from Hudson Street.  Councilman Sedon added that Hudson Street Lot would be closed at the end of July or beginning of August.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that they are looking at a very short window of time that those spots would remain vacant, and are comfortable moving forward that is exactly the allocation required for the displaced vehicles.

Mr. Loving added that there were questions about the pricing of Hudson Street versus the Train Station, and whether they were going to have to make up for that pricing difference if they could now park at the Train Station.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it would be the luck of the draw.

Anne Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that there was a suggestion made on social media that maybe on the night of the Fourth before the fireworks begins, some collection buckets could go around at some of the unpaid viewing spots.  She didn’t know if that would be appropriate but it was a thought that some of the volunteers may be able to do that.  

There were no additional comments from the public.

Mayor Hache stated that the next meeting is on July 10th for a Public Work Session at 7:30 P.M., and he wished everyone a safe and happy Independence Day.

  1. ADJOURNMENT

 

There being no further business to come before the Village Council, on a motion by Councilman Sedon, seconded by Councilwoman Walsh, and carried unanimously by voice vote, the Village Council’s Work Session was adjourned at 8:37 P.M.

______________________________

                                                                                    Ramon M. Hache, Sr.                        

                                                                                                        Mayor                            

______________________________

              Donna M. Jackson

           Deputy Village Clerk

  • Hits: 8

A REGULAR WORK SESSION OF THE VILLAGE COUNCIL OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD HELD IN THE SYDNEY V. STOLDT, JR. COURT ROOM OF THE RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE HALL, 131 NORTH MAPLE AVENUE, RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY ON JUNE 5, 2019 AT 7:30 P.M.

 

  1. CALL TO ORDER – OPEN PUBLIC MEETINGS ACT – ROLL CALL – FLAG    SALUTE

Mayor Hache called the meeting to order at 7:30 P.M. and read the Statement of Compliance with the Open Public Meetings Act.  At roll call the following were present: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache.  Also present were Heather Mailander, Village Manager/Village Clerk; Matthew Rogers, Village Attorney; and Donna Jackson, Deputy Village Clerk. 

Mayor Hache led those in attendance in the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag as well as in a Moment of Silence to honor the brave men and women serving in our armed forces and all our first responders.

  1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

Paul Evers, 27 Sherman Place, stated that he was here in reference to the parking on Sherman Place.  It is a small dead end street between Washington Avenue and Ridgewood Avenue.  A professional building on Ridgewood Avenue was allowed to expand which closed off their entry and exit and forced an entry and exit onto Sherman Place.  This has caused Sherman Place to become an extension of their parking facilities, and the traffic situation has degraded.  For the last five years the neighborhood has been communicating to the Village Council that there has been issues with safety, parking, congestion, and they feel that it is time to act. 

Mr. Evers stated that a few months ago they appreciated the Village Council’s recommendation, but they didn’t agree with the recommendation and were asked to provide a counterproposal including maps, documentation, and pictures.  He added that they were excited to submit it but were disappointed that their recommendations weren’t included in the proposal that is being presented today.  Their neighbors on South Sherman and Garfield are concerned that the problem is just going to be pushed down to their streets.

Mr. Evers stated that he was asking that they hold off voting on this proposal and convene a meeting of the neighborhood with the town to come up with a proposal that solves the root cause of the problem and that they can all agree to.

Paul White, 152 Woodside Avenue, stated that he and his wife have lived in the Vilage for 40 years.  He used to be a runner and then a biker, and the roads are in terrible condition.  He added that he has emailed the Village Council, called the Village Manager and the Engineering Department.  He stated that the Mayor told him that $2 million had been spent on the roads, but more needs to be done.  When he goes down from his house to the County park and takes Prospect, it is a mess.  When you turn off Woodside it is a disgrace, and he was told by his neighbor that there was a work crew that had attempted to fill in potholes.  He added that he tried to go down Spring and it is as bad, if not worse.  Mr. White added that he wanted to encourage the Village Council to find more resources as he has never seen the roads in this kind of shape.  He understands the budgetary pressure, but the roads are in bad shape and it needs to be addressed.

Chris Reid, 112 Stanley Place, stated that he agreed with Mr. Evers, and that you can only get to his house on Sherman Place and he would love if the town had a sub-committee to discuss parking issues in the neighborhood.  If the neighbors could get together and discuss things with someone from the town that would be incredible and it can probably be used as a template for other areas in the town.

Kim Schwartz, 56 Sherman Place, stated that she agreed with Mr. Evers and Mr. Reid about the Sherman parking issue.  There needs to be a sub-committee and they don’t want to push this problem down the road.  There are a lot of issues there and they need to study this before they just do something.

Jen Schnell, 43 Sherman Place, stated that she was here to ask for the formation of a subcommittee to address the parking on Sherman Place as well as the entire George Washington Middle School neighborhood.

Rolf Edelman, 106 North Walnut Street, stated that they do have some good ideas to follow up on Councilman Voigt’s ideas and they would like to follow up on his proposal and let the Village Council know that they are here.

There were no additional comments from the public.

Mayor Hache stated that the Village Council was not voting on anything tonight, they were just having a discussion.  He liked the idea of a subcommittee of having residents and Village staff and perhaps a couple of members of the Village Council, but they would discuss later.

  1. MANAGERS REPORT

Graydon Pool – Ms. Mailander stated that Graydon Pool opened on Saturday, June 1st.  The early season weekend hours are from 10:00 A.M. to 7:30 P.M.  Weekday hours are noon to 7:30 P.M.  Residents can purchase memberships in person at the pool office or a ridgewoodnj.net/ communitypass.  Regular season begins June 24th through August 11th, and then the late season is August 12th to September 2nd.  Various program offerings and amenities include spray fountains, Adirondack chairs, a shade system, recreational game area, picnic area with tables and charcoal grills Wi-Fi accessibility, the Waterside Café from noon to 7:00 P.M., swim lessons, story time under the pavilion, a lending library, and special events include movie nights, concerts and more.

Kasschau Memorial Shell – Ms. Mailander stated that the Kasschau Memorial Shell located on Veterans Field behind the Library, will begin its season tomorrow night.  Free live concert popular music concerts are presented on Tuesday and Thursday nights at 8:00 P.M. in June, July and August.  Bring a chair or a blanket and enjoy these concerts under the stars.  This program is presented due to the generous sponsorship of several local businesses and the Village of Ridgewood.  The Senior Bus will be available for transportation to several of these performances.  If you are an older resident and wish to go to one of these performances please call 201-670-5500 extension 203 for details and for which performances they will have the bus available.

 

Dog Licenses – Ms. Mailander stated that dog licenses are due for renewal in the month of June.  After July 1st a $20 late fee will be charged.  Dog owners were reminded by an email or mailing to complete the renewal form and to return it with a check to the Health Department.  Office hours are 8:30 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. Monday to Friday.

 

Ridgewood Guild – Ms. Mailander stated that the Ridgewood Guild provides Movies Under the Stars on Wednesday nights twice a month in June, July, and August in Memorial Park at Van Neste Square at sundown.  The Postman Always Rings Twice will be shown on June 12th, and The Wizard of Oz on June 26th.  Bring a chair or a blanket and enjoy the show.

 

Art in the Park – The Ridgewood Guild also sponsor three Art in the Parks evening events.  Friday, June 7th, July 12th and August 2nd.  Take a stroll in the park and enjoy music and artwork.  Art for sale those evenings have proceeds benefitting the Ridgewood Guild.

 

Age Friendly Introduction to the Senior Bus –  Ms. Mailander stated that Age Friendly Ridgewood sponsored an Introduction to the Senior Bus last week with morning and afternoon bus rides provided for ten residents each trip to learn more about our Central Business District and other local activities.  Along the route Ridgewood representatives me the bus and spoke with the riders, sharing fun facts and providing bags with additional information.  Please call 201-670-5500 extension 203.

 

Registration for Summer Day Camp – Ms. Mailander stated that registration for summer day camp has started and will be open until the cutoff on June 10th, after that time there is an additional $50 fee.  Day Camp begins Tuesday, June 25th.

 

Household Hazardous Waste Collection – Ms. Mailander stated that Sunday June 23rd from 9:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. Bergen County Utilities Authority will collect Household Hazardous Waste at Bergen Community College on Paramus Road in Paramus rain or shine.  Bergen County residency is required.

 

Parking in Village-Owned Lots after 3:00 P.M. – Ms. Mailander reminded residents that parking in all Village-owned parking lots after 3:00 P.M. does not require a permit.  There are still time restrictions of three hours and parking fees are still in effect.

 

  1. COUNCIL REPORTS

Community Center Advisory Board – Councilman Voigt stated that the Community Center Advisory Board met last week.  Don Liebrich is stepping down as chair of the CCAB, and they would like to thank him for his service as he has been doing so for four years. 

On May 31st, Ridgewood became the 355th community in the US to be enrolled in the AARP Network of Age Friendly Communities.  This network encourages municipalities to prepare for the rapid aging of the U.S. population.  Councilman Voigt stated that Age Friendly Ridgewood under the leadership of Sheila Brogan, Beth Abbot, Sue Ulrich and Deanna Schablick have done a really nice job and should be congratulated for all they have done.  President of the AARP, Livell Jones and Senior Program Specialist, Bridget Quinn were on hand to present the award to Mayor Hache.  Julia Strombus, Program Director for the Henry and Marilyn Taub Foundation were also present.  The Taub Foundation has been a huge contributor to Age Friendly Ridgewood and they thank them very much.

June 1st Age Friendly hosted a senior breakfast at Graydon Pool, it was attended by over 70 seniors and they had a great time.  Music, food and friendship.  He thanked Sheila Brogan, Beth Abbot, Sue Ulrich and Deanna Schablick for coordinating this.

Tuesday June 11th there will be a ArtBeat concert at the Kasschau Shell, acapella, rock, and blues students will be there for entertainment.

Councilman Voigt added that they spoke about West Glen, and Mr. Rutishauser stated that they would continue to pave the sidewalk west of Hillcrest up the hill.  They will also fix Union Street with more prominent one way signage and one way turn signs out of the physician’s office.

Councilman Voigt added that Starbucks coffee on Franklin has continued issues, and they will have a person there to help move the traffic into the property and will put an additional sign on the left side of the exit so drivers know to turn right instead of left.

Councilman Voigt stated that there was a request from a resident on Walthery Avenue that cars are driving at excessive speeds on that road, which Ms. Mailander has agreed to look into.  Monte Vista is something they will also talk about.

Planning Board – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Planning Board met last night.  There were a couple zoning reviews.  One was to correct an inconsistency in Chapter 251 as it relates to pools, so they are just cleaning up some inconsistencies.  Also, a review of a zoning ordinance to extend the historic Central Business District to include the bus structure.  This will allow the Village to seek grant opportunities and to communicate with SHPO and make certain that the award winning design is preserved for future generations.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she had an email from a resident that warrants discussion.  She was not here at the May 22nd meeting and evidently there was an exchange regarding the November versus April vote on the Board of Election.  Councilman Voigt indicated that if the BOE budget exceeded 2% it would automatically kick in a vote.  There was an interpretation that meant that if the BOE budget exceeded a 2% cap then there would be a vote in November and that is not necessarily true.  Because of exceptions, exemptions, and the use of CAP Bank, the increase could be significantly higher than 2% and there would be no budget vote necessarily in November.  April elections guarantee that regardless of what the budget increase is, there will always be a vote.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Village Council for years has not gone over their 2% and have banked the difference in the CAP Bank which sits for three years and then expires.  They could take that CAP Bank at any time and increase the tax levy.  She added that it was important to understand that just because the BOE exceeds a 2% necessarily does not guarantee a vote.  It depends on what that overage is made by.

Mr. Rogers stated that he gave a comment that 2% exceeding would warrant a vote, but he could do some research and report back next week.

Pride Month Celebration – Mayor Hache stated that on June 1st they had a celebration of Pride Month, celebrating Ridgewood’s diversity at Memorial Park at Van Neste Square.  They raised the Pride flag and there was a lot of support from the community and from our elected and public officials throughout the state.  Each one brought a unique perspective, and the support was so strong and overwhelming it was great to be a part of Ridgewood that day.  There were a lot of volunteers that stepped up and the weather couldn’t have been any better.

Roadway Paving – Mayor Hache stated that regarding the conditions of the roads we have had brutal winters and the progress in paving is also slowed down by the wet weather.  That makes it very difficult to pave our road, but the money is there and the paving schedule is on the Village website.  They didn’t make it through last year’s schedule because of the weather, but he appreciates resident’s patience with this as they move through the process and the timeline.

 

  1. DISCUSSION

 

  1. Ridgewood Water - None

 

  1. Parking

 

  1. Parking on Sherman Place

 

Ms. Mailander asked Mr. Rutishauser and Sergeant Jay Chuck to please come up to discuss this with the Village Council.  As the residents mentioned, they do have a challenge because their street has nearly become the parking lot for the professional building. 

Mr. Rutishauser stated that Sherman Place is a very short street, and they were concerned with the portion just north of Washington Place.  There is a medical office building on West Ridgewood Avenue that has an exit driveway onto Sherman Place.  The intensity of use in the office building has increased, resulting in more vehicular traffic.  The current suggestion they have is to make the traffic in the southbound direction no parking and allow parking in the northbound direction.  They have recently put up some signage there.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked that they took the parking on the east side of the road and left parking there for two hours, and then on the west side of the road removed parking and then changed it so there was no U-turn.  There is also the Do Not Enter sign.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that the Do Not Enter sign refers to the driveway of the office building, which is one way and occasionally people ignore that and cut through there, hence the reason for the sign.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that if she is facing north, parked on the east side of the road, if she can’t make a U-turn she can’t get out of the street.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that was something that was discussed at previous meetings and it seemed to be the decision of the Village Council to not have that U-turn ordinance.  It was still a discussion item, and if the Village Council feels it’s not warranted, they can eliminate it from the ordinance.  He added that tonight, he would like to get a feel for what the Village Council and residents would like on that street and then they can prepare an ordinance accordingly.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she has spoken to a lot of the residents and has read their emails, and several weeks ago suggested to one of the residents that an ad-hoc committee be organized. We don’t want a situation as similar to Pomander where there was a shift of cars that migrated from one street to another.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they see that all too often in the Village.  The parkers move to the next block where there isn’t a restriction.  He added that it is a constant battle and it is tough to gauge how far you would have to create an area to get them to go further away.

Councilwoman Knudsen wondered if she asked for the resolution of approval for the office building when it occurred 30 years ago. Mr. Rutishauser stated that he thinks they have looked for it.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it might be useful to have that and see if there is any availability of the original site plan and the resolution.  If there was a representation that there was X amount of activity going on there and a representation of anticipated vehicular activity, they might have something in there.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that he does feel that the office building has intensified its use which could be due to a change in type of physician.  From his experience, the resolutions of 30 years ago are not as detailed as they are currently, but they would look for the file.

Councilman Sedon stated that he wanted to know how the U-turn would work for people to get out of North Sherman.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they could make a 3-point turn if there is room.  Councilman Sedon stated that he thought there would be a value in getting together with residents because they have experience from living there but then it may also be helpful for Mr. Rutishauser to explain his position, as well, because there may be specific guidelines that have to be followed.

Mayor Hache asked Councilman Voigt if there was any further discussion in CSAC.  Councilman Voigt stated that as it related to this situation there was no further discussion but he did have a couple of questions.  He asked Sergeant Chuck about parking spaces on Ridgewood Avenue and if they were used at all.  Sergeant Chuck stated that they were used all day.  Councilman Voigt asked the types of businesses that can be there with regard to the zoning, are they sure that the types of businesses that can be there are there.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that he would have to take a look at it as he didn’t have the zone committed to memory.  Councilman Voigt stated that it seems like there is a fairly high intensity use of those offices and he wanted to make sure that whoever was in there was compliant with what was supposed to be there.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that she believes they saw a site plan at CSAC a few years ago, and there is a garbage receptacle there that is not on the original plan and that the site plan did show exit only and that there was not a two way.  She added that the challenge with this block is that it is not just that building, as it’s also school parking and there has to be a balance for the residents.  The challenge is restricting from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. then the residents don’t get to use the road as well.  She stated that with the new sign they would make sure that there is only exit, but when they exit it takes up the west side of the road but then there are only a couple of parking spots there.  Sergeant Chuck stated that it has to be 50 feet on the stop sign side and 25 feet on the other side.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that without parking on the west side there would only be a couple of spaces that would be available on the east curb.  Sergeant Chuck stated that you would be cutting the parking in half.  Councilwoman Walsh asked how do you find the balance because if you count residents, there are 11 homes.  Even if you had only one spot for them to have a spot for a guest than anybody else would be pushed onto the other streets.  So, she wasn’t sure how to find the balance other than cutting down the amount of spots there.

Mayor Hache stated that it isn’t easy, but instead of trying to find the situation that is just right, the idea of creating the sub-committee to get a working committee with Village professionals and two Village Council members is the next step.  He asked for anyone who would like to volunteer for the subcommittee to write to the Village Council.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if the Do Not Enter sign that was installed as enforceable, and who had jurisdiction over that.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that it is a regulatory sign and he believes it can be enforced.  Sergeant Chuck stated that was unenforceable because it is a Do Not Enter sign on private property.  The one concern that the Police Department has is the no U-turn, as they look at the street 360 degrees and that is just a problem of the overuse of the commercial space, but they think about grandmas visiting, landscapers, are coming from Washington Place and if you remove U-turn restrictions you can’t leave the road.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the experience on her street, Bogart, Pomander, and Sherman, the uniqueness of these neighborhoods is best understood by the residents and neighbors and they typically come up with the best solutions, so she supports letting them help work on this as a more comprehensive approach.

Ms. Mailander asked for whoever wants to be a spokesperson to contact her, so they will be the one who will email and notify the other neighbors on the street.  They will set up a meeting internally with two Councilmembers, neighbors, and the professionals to come up with the best solution with Sergeant Chuck for the entire area and not just one part of it.

 

  1. Monte Vista Avenue Parking Restrictions

 

Ms. Mailander stated that at the last meeting there was a resident who requested that there be restrictions because there were issues with commuters parking there all day.  There are six cars who park there consistently.  Sergeant Chuck stated that the Police Department looked into that and they are non-Ridgewood residents parking there every day and are going over to the train station.  That neighborhood has time limit restrictions to relieve the neighborhood from long term parking, and so that road is wide enough to have parking on both sides of the street, but if the Village Council is interested in addressing the long term parking they would recommend time limit restrictions.  That neighborhood has two, three, and four hour restrictions, and they find that three hours works the best but four hours gives a lot of time.

Councilman Voigt asked if this related at all to what is going on with parking at the train station, or has this been in existence for a long period of time.  Sergeant Chuck stated that he thinks that it has been in existence for a long period of time and he doesn’t think it is related to the construction.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that currently there is parking on both sides for two hours between 7:00 A.M. and 8:00 P.M. on Madison.  Sergeant Chuck stated that Madison is an anomaly as there are about nine parking restrictions there, which was one of the things that they looked into and sent to Mr. Rutishauser to streamline.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that with all the different time restrictions, if the goal is to dissuade commuters a two or four hour duration would suffice.  A shorter time restriction could be detrimental to the Women’s Club for the events that they have and it is hard to gauge when they have events, but a four hour time limit should cover a great majority of what they do and the people that have to park on the street should be covered.

Mayor Hache asked if anyone from the neighborhood was here, and there wasn’t anyone.  He added that they should discuss this with any residents and make sure that this works and then see what the feedback is before they put it on the agenda to introduce.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she agreed with Mayor Hache and asked if this was a situation where they should send a letter to the residents.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they could do this if the Village Council wished, and they would take the property tax listing and send them a letter.  Councilman Sedon stated that he was a fan of sending letters.

  1. Budget

 

  1. Award Contract – National Cooperative Agreement – Caterpillar Backhoe Signal and Water Pollution Control Divisions

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Village’s Traffic and Signal Division and Water Pollution Control Division share a 1983 Ford Backhoe which is old and ill-suited for repairing sanitary sewer breaks.  They are trying to repair more sanitary sewer breaks in-house as opposed to going to an outside contractor.  The Village joined Sourcewell last year, and working with the Sourcewell vendor Caterpillar through their local dealer, Foley, Inc. they have found a rubber tire backhoe in an amount not to exceed $145,961.  This is under the Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing and their recommendation is to purchase this vehicle, funding is in the 2019 Capital account.

 

  1. Award Contract – Cooperative Purchasing Agreement – 2020 Fire Pumper

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is going to be purchased through the Houston-Galveston Area Cooperative Purchasing Program.  It will replace two of the Fire Department’s current pumpers, a 1994 Pierce fire pumper and a 2000 Pierce fire pumper.  The 2000 Pierce fire pumper will be traded in within 30 days of the purchase order being issued with a $28,000 trade in value.  The 1994 Pierce pumper will be sold on GovDeals when they receive the 2020 pumper.  The cost to purchase the pumper is $478,703.15. 

The fire pumper committee consisted of Captain Schmidt, Lieutenant Zales, Firefighter Jacoby, and Chief Van Goor.  They put together the specifications and it will take one year from the time it is ordered to when it is delivered.  Right now there are five pumpers, and they realized they only use four consistently, so they will all be newer models.  The space in the garage that now occupies the fifth pumper will be occupied by the ambulance that they use to respond to medical emergencies.

 

  1. Authorize Online Auction Service – Sourcewell

 

Ms. Mailander stated that GovDeals is now operating through Sourcewell, so they just need to authorize Sourcewell as the Cooperative Purchasing Agreement so they can continue to use GovDeals.

 

  1. Award Professional Services Contract – Certified Lake Manager

 

Ms. Mailander stated that because the Village is dredging Kings Pond, among the condition in the DEP permit are the careful removal of any fish in the pond prior to lowering the water and dredging the pond and also that the sediment be sampled.  Princeton Hydro out of Ringoes, New Jersey as a Certified Lake Manager on staff and they can do these required items for a contract not to exceed $12,000.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they have had this dredging conversation for a while versus de-snagging, and Jeanne Epiphan had recommended de-snagging.  Her recollection was that the dredging upset the eco-system under the water.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that the Village has dredged this pond a number of times in the past, including in 1999 right before Hurricane Floyd which promptly filled it up and it had to be dredged again.  The pond is a sediment trap and it also was subjected to a very large effluent discharge from the Northwest Bergen Sanitary Sewer that had a significant failure.  He added that de-silting and de-snagging is not allowed to change the elevations of a water body very much, and they are doing much more than that and are digging out all of the muck since 1999.

 

  1. Award Contract – National Cooperative Purchasing Agreement – Roll-Off Truck with Salter – Street Division

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Streets Division has Capital Funds to purchase a new roll-off truck with salter.  The new truck will replace two old Volvo dump trucks that were acquired in 1999.  They were declared surplus and taken out of service in 2015 due to corrosion issues and cracked frames.  They also had issues with their braking systems.  This is going to be purchased through the Sourcewell vendor and their local dealer, Gabrielli Kenworth, in an amount not to exceed $273,506.80.

 

  1. Award Contract – Disposal of Grass Clippings

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this needs to be done annually because they cannot store yard waste materials at the Lakeview Compost Site.  Jersey Mulch Products gave a sole quote.  The Village went out to three companies and only received one back, in an amount not to exceed $90,000 at $20.00 per cubic yard.  This is approximately 4,500 cubic yards of grass clippings and in previous years the Village had anticipated 7,000 cubic yards, so they may have to do an additional award.

Councilman Voigt asked where the additional $40,000 would come from.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that was something that he would discuss with Ms. Mailander and Mr. Rooney.  Right now we are in a very vigorous growing cycle, but maybe the weather will change.  Councilwoman Walsh suggested people mulch the grass and leave it on their lawns.  Councilman Voigt asked why there was a 33% increase this year.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that the solid waste field is under increasing regulations from NJDEP.  One of the vendors the Village contacted wouldn’t give a price, but the Village also couldn’t consider them because they would not give their NJDEP N-Source number.  When the Village gets audited for operations at Lakeview they have to show a complete trail of where the grass clippings go.  Another entity that the Village has done business within the past was also unresponsive.

 

  1. Award Contract – Selective Clearing for Berm Construction at Schedler Property

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they received bids on Thursday, May 23rd.  There were two plan holders eligible to bid and they received one bid.  The only bid received was from Downes Tree Service in the amount of $37,535.  She added that the Village Council received a sketch of the property and where the trees will be removed.  It will be a different look for the neighbors in the area, but this will be to create the berm which will create better shielding from Route 17.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they could confirm that all of the soil that has been deposited there has been tested and certified clean.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they have had tests of the soil.  The construction fill pile generated by the Water Department was tested and found to be satisfactory.  They provided an extensive report from a Licensed Site Remediation Professional (LSRP) for the material from the Dayton project.  He added that he could email this information to the Village Council.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that questions have come up.  Mr. Rutishauser added that it has been tested and confirmed safe for its intended purpose which is a recreational field/facility where the exposure is to the youngest members of our community.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that the trees that are being removed are essentially going to be replaced because the berm that is being created is going to have trees planted on that.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they have an alternating pattern of evergreens and also Councilwoman Walsh requested fencing on top which will be incorporated.  There will be the screening effect of the evergreens and the safety effect of the fence.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if this was consistent with the plan that was developed by the committee that included members of the immediate surrounding neighborhood.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that he believes it is.  Mayor Hache stated that the original estimate didn’t have a line for the selective clearing for berm construction.  He asked if this was adding to what they had originally or was this something else.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that he broke out the work, as he didn’t put it in one large bid because they were able to do that and because he was instructed to get this project moving along.  His office is currently doing the design for the parking lot, and they hope to get that out and the berm construction bid out in the next month or two.  Mayor Hache asked if the tree removal and the free soil were a wash on cost.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that he would have to check that.

 

  1. Release of Maintenance Bond – 44 Godwin Avenue

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this maintenance bond was for work done at Whole Foods in an amount of $30,648.45.  The required site improvements have been satisfactorily completed and the bond can be released, so they need a resolution for next week’s meeting.

 

  1. Award Contract – Cooperative Pricing System – Rental of Interim Sewage Transfer Pumps – Andover Pump Station

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Village of Ridgewood Andover Pump Station recently experienced a failure of its two pumps.  They have ordered two new pumps which should be delivered by the end of this year.  In the interim, due to the failure of the pump station’s two pumps, they needed to install a temporary pump to keep the station operating.  There is a resolution to approve Pumping Services, Inc. to provide rental pumps, hoses, and connections for the rental pump setup.  The cost is approximately $2,356.20 per month.  Also included are service charges, pump setup and when done, pump breakdown costs.  At this time they anticipate a budget of $60,000.  There is money available for this.

Councilman Voigt asked why it was taking so long for the pumps.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they have to be manufactured as they are of a special size and power requirements and are not an off-the-shelf item.  The pumps are also coming from Europe so he is hoping there is no negative impact due to trade tariffs.  Councilman Voigt asked if the rental is an expense.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that it is an expense but it is capital because it’s in the interim.  Ms. Mailander stated that they would confirm that with Mr. Rooney.

 

  1. Award Contract – Surface Restoration of West Façade of Village Hall

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they contacted at least five contractors to come and look at painting that they wanted done.  They received two proposals and there are some concerns with the low proposal regarding the type of cleanup that would occur.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they did an informal solicitation for bids for work to the west façade.  Five vendors were contacted and they received two bids.  Both vendors had language in their proposals where they could be leaving paint chips in the landscaping beds and they felt that was not good.  Both presented that would be the Village’s problem, which would be aesthetics and otherwise.  He added that they checked the quotes with the State law on prevailing wages, and both quotes the vendors would be required to pay their staff prevailing wages and provide certified payrolls to the Village.

Ms. Mailander stated that they would go back to the vendors and discuss that with them and if it is found that they do not pay prevailing wage they will have to go back out to bid.  If they can move forward they will, but if not they will possibly bring it back for July.

 

  1. Award Contract – Underground Storage Tank System Repair

 

Ms. Mailander stated that at Fleet Services one of the alarms went off for one of the underground storage tanks.  Betts Environmental of Butler was hired to investigate the alarm condition.  The tank was taken out of service.  Betts responded to Fleet and excavated the tank area.  Betts found a failure in a vent riser pipe from the interstitial space that permitted ground water to enter the interstitial space causing the alarm condition.  Betts then had an independent agency test the tank to confirm the tank was tight and not leaking.  This was confirmed, and then the tank was brought back online.

The Village’s EJIF insurance fund was notified and they have been apprised of the results and followed up on a request and recommendation to have the waste oil tank tested and a monitoring probe installed.  The system is approximately 32 years old and will need to be replaced in the next few years.  The current system of underground storage tanks were installed after a major spill and subsequent cleanup which also resulted in the Village purchasing a home on Oak Street, at the time.  Ms. Mailander stated that they have a resolution to pay Bett’s for the emergency work they did as well as work requested by the EJIFF to keep the waste oil tank compliant with NJDEP regulations in an amount not to exceed $30,536.  This may be funded partially through insurance.

Councilman Voigt stated that this memo refers to no funds in the capital accounts.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that currently they have no capital funding for replacement of the UST’s so he was glad that they found a problem that could be fixed and did not confirm that the tanks were cracked.  The cost for replacing those tanks is in the range of $400,000 to $600,000.  Ms. Mailander added that this was something they should think about for next year’s capital budget.  Councilman Voigt asked if there were no Capital funds for the fix or for the new tanks.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that definitely not for the new tanks, but for the fix he would defer to Mr. Rooney.  Ms. Mailander added that Mr. Rooney assured her that they would find the funding.  Mr. Rutishauser added that they brought EJIF in because the alarm could mean that the tank was cracked which had happened before.

Councilman Sedon asked if the only breach that occurred was in the interstitial space.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that was correct.

 

  1. Award Contract – Cooperative Purchasing Program – Bucket Truck Chassis – Parks Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for the purchase of a Western Star truck chassis for the Parks Department in the amount of $106,566.  The vendor is Hudson County Motors of Secaucus.  The forestry body and crane for the bucket truck will be provided and assembled by Timmerman Equipment Company.  This was approved in the 2019 Capital Budget.

 

  1. Award Contract – Cooperative Purchasing Program – Bucket Truck Aerial Lift – Parks Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is a purchase under the Educational Services of New Jersey Cooperative Purchasing Contract for an aerial lift in the amount of $170,823.  The vendor is Timmerman Equipment Company, and it was approved in the 2019 Capital Budget.  The truck chassis and the aerial lift will go together and the Parks Department will be using it for their work.

  1. Policy

 

  1. Guidelines for Use of Flagpole in Public Forum Space

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was regarding the flagpole at Memorial Park in Van Neste Square.  Mr. Rogers stated that with the success of the flagpole, someone brought to the attention that they may need to look at some type of ordinance outlining the use of the flagpole, this is in case there is more than one proposed user of the flagpole at one time.  They can set up some guidelines as to how it might be used.  He added that Mr. Rutishauser would get to him regarding the secs of the flagpole and what weight it can take.  They should consider time periods as to how long a particular flag can fly.  Other things to look at are in case there is more than one group that wants to get on at a particular time, how do they discern or decide one from another, so the Village Council has the authority to set up some guidelines with regard to that.

Mr. Rogers suggested setting up an application designating a responsible party and the time periods that they would like to fly the flag.  This was done with holiday displays, and these are things that they can take a look at and put together.  Mayor Hache asked what the timelines are for banners.  Mr. Rogers stated that they have banners at the train trestle that are for non-profits normally, and there are regulations regarding displays.  They don’t have any other regulations out there for banners.  Mayor Hache asked for the public forum space, were there any other guidelines.  Mr. Rogers stated that he didn’t believe there were any regulations.  Ms. Mailander stated that Janet Fricke handles the banners.

Janet Fricke, 223 Woodland Avenue, stated that she was here as a resident tonight and usually because they want to help the non-profits, it is usually a one week commitment but sometimes they could leave it for two weeks.  She added that it could be defined better than it is today.  Councilman Voigt asked Mr. Rogers how this differs from the flagpole at Village Hall.  Mr. Rogers stated that it doesn’t differ, but this is a flagpole at Van Neste Square that can be used for flying flags for various uses.  Councilman Voigt asked if they were doing this here, why weren’t they doing it at Village Hall.  Mr. Rogers stated that would be where they would be flying the flags.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it was a public forum space.  Councilman Voigt clarified that Village Hall is not a public forum space.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she was made aware by email of the flagpole donation, and asked if there was a procedure where they had to accept a gift or donation and she doesn’t know where or when the gift was accepted.  Ms. Mailander stated that she has a resolution on for next week’s meeting for acceptance of the flagpole.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they have already established a time frame for a flag in their mind by virtue of a month.  Mr. Rogers stated that he didn’t think they had.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that Pride Month is during the month of June, so next year they couldn’t just do a week.  Mr. Rogers stated that Pride Month is for the month, Breast Cancer Awareness month is the month of October, so in the consideration of these things in the public forum, they are going to find that these are not regulations that are going to stand as it’s not the purpose of the forum.

Mr. Rogers stated that if you were allowing this to be the public forum flagpole then you have to allow these purposes and you can’t cut it off for a week when the purpose is to fly a Pride flag for the month of June.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they would have to be consistent with the guidelines of a month.  Councilman Sedon suggested saying up to a month.  Mayor Hache asked about the trestle banners, the Village puts them there and if there are not additional requests it could stay there all year.  Mr. Rogers stated that the trestle is not a public forum spot, and they are dealing with a public speech issue here.  Mayor Hache asked if the Village would have a subordinate right to put up what it deemed appropriate for a minimum amount of time as well.  Mr. Rogers stated only if they wanted to regulate it by ordinance, but it’s different from the public forum which is allowing speech to be freely expressed.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they weren’t abridging anyone’s freedom of speech.  Mr. Rogers stated that they were comparing apples and oranges with the trestle and the public forum space.

Mayor Hache stated that in the public forum space, a flag can go up two ways, the Village puts it up or somebody requests it and it goes up, are they then saying that the Village is also subject to a time restriction.  Mr. Rogers asked if the Village owns the pole, or just the space where it was erected as he thought the pole was donated.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the pole was given as a gift and they were accepting the gift.  Mr. Rogers stated that they were accepting the use of the flagpole for that purpose.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they were accepting the gift of the pole and have installed the pole, so the pole now is owned by the Village, and she asked Mr. Rogers if that was accurate.  Mr. Rogers stated that he would assume.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the people who gave the gift are not retaining ownership.  Mr. Rogers stated that he was assuming that the flagpole is there for the purposes of a public forum for the opportunity of speech. 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that to the Mayor’s point, the Village has jurisdiction over the pole, so if they decide during the off times if they want to put up a sign of their choice they could do that.  Mr. Rogers stated that if they regulate the pole for those purposes then that’s fine.  Mayor Hache stated that it was something to look at.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it is a public forum space and so her opinion is that they should make the pole available because that was the intent of it as it was donated.  Mr. Rogers stated that he assumed that this was going to be for public speech.  Mayor Hache stated that specific to the time restrictions, can the Village as owner of the pole, say everyone can put it up for a week, but the Village can put it up for as long as it wants.  Mr. Rogers stated that if they were using it as a public forum that would be restrictive.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that the easiest way to look at the pole is using Pride Month as an example.  It is celebrated for a month and it doesn’t necessarily mean you have to fly the flag for the entire month.  If they say the intent is to let residents express themselves, they are going to give each person a week to do that.  If there is nobody else then they can fly it until the next person, and if there are no requests they can fly the American flag as the default.  Mayor Hache stated that was the conversation with the donors, that the default will always be the American flag.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she didn’t see how they could expect to get a month for the Pride flag if it was going to be an entire month.  Mr. Rogers stated since they can regulate time, place, and manner, they can provide for an extended period and regulate it for one week.  As long as it doesn’t interrupt another request then they can grant the request fully.  He suggested that the application can’t be filed to the Village Clerk’s office no sooner than 60 days ahead of the time but no later than 30 days ahead of time.  He added that you need parameters between the time that you can make the application and the time where you can no longer make the application.  Councilwoman Walsh agreed.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked what if somebody wanted to put up a flag, and then somebody wanted to put up the same flag right after.  She asked if it was the same message that would be on the timeframe, or would it be the actual message that is restricted.  Mr. Rogers stated that they would have to put it up in the application process, adding that even if it is accepted there is the possibility that if something comes in that interrupts that they may be given preference.  He added that they have to find out if they fly two or three flags, adding that they would have size limitations that would adjust how it is used.  Mayor Hache asked if the size of the flag was determined by the size of the pole.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that he submitted a request to Signal to get information from the manufacturer as to what can be flown on this type of pole.  Mayor Hache stated that he read something in New Jersey based on the speed of the wind the size is determined to be five feet by eight feet.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that it is usually a 6:1 ratio on the height of the flag.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if flagpoles need an annual inspection.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that the Signal Division does take a look at them, as periodically they need their lanyards of hoisting mechanisms lubricated, maintained, or replaced.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would meet with Mr. Rutishauser and Mr. Rogers to come up with something and get it back before the Village Council end of June or beginning of July and they can go forward from there.

 

  1. Amending Chapter 190 Land Use Development – Illuminated Signs in Business District and Extend Suspension of Ordinance for Certain Illuminated Signs in Central Business District

 

Ms. Mailander stated that in December the relaxation of the suspension of the ordinance expired and they put it to June 30th.  Now that they have a proposed ordinance from the Planning Board they are going to have to extend it again.  If the Village Council is agreeable to what the Planning Board is proposing, they could introduce it next week, adopt it in July, and it would be effective in the beginning of August, but maybe they should select a date of October 30th so they don’t have to extend it again.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that this is probably one of the most difficult ordinances they have had to work on because of the number of different types of illuminated displays, what the criteria would be for the information that can be on the display.  She added that she thinks at this point, they were comfortable with the way they concluded this and Chairman Joel sent a letter saying that this is the proposed ordinance that the Planning Board agreed to.  She deferred to everyone else because it was so difficult to figure this one out.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that she thinks some illuminated signs may be tasteful and others may not, and once they go down that path what is going to be the approval process for the signage color, and type.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it would be no different than having a T.V. monitor.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that you could, in theory, have a neon sign with a monitor.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that Samba Bowls has theirs on an angle.  She added that they were happy to put it on hold and everyone could take a walk downtown and see what they think about the monitors that are existing and maybe there is additional feedback that would help.  She suggested holding it as you would hate people to get tickets because they aren’t getting it right.

Mayor Hache stated that although he thinks it is an improvement, there is still a lack of specificity and he thinks it needs to be refined a bit more.  Ms. Mailander suggested the Village Council review it on their own and Mr. Rogers would look at it so they could come back with individual recommendations.  The recommendation was that they do the resolution to extend the ordinance enforcement to December 31st.  Ms. Mailander added that this does permit unlettered balloons and banners for a grand opening and they cannot exceed seven days, which she thinks is a good improvement.  Mayor Hache suggested limiting the number of times that balloons can be put up.  Ms. Mailander stated that they would have a way to enforce that.

 

  1. Establishment of Turn Lane on Franklin Avenue

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Village Council received a new map this evening.  This is on Franklin Avenue from Cottage Place to Oak Street.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that it is a concept sketch that Engineering and the Police Department have been working on to address some concerns about traffic going into Starbucks and Ben and Jerry’s with left-hand turns.  One way they could possibly make this work better is through a center left turn lane as they are used in many other parts of the country.  They can be at first a little bit scary without knowing the other driver’s intent.

Sergeant Chuck stated that the Police Department was very excited for this proposal as it was the first time that the Village has used newer traffic habits to make improvements and are managing the problem instead of saying no.  They found it difficult to manage no left turns into one parking lot, and the safety concerns were traffic getting backed up.  This would open it up so the turns would be stopping the free flow, so the turns would be in the middle and would turn during the gaps.  This would reduce the frustrations that they have seen and it will probably help with the intersections.

Mr. Rutishauser stated that if the Village Council is in favor of this, they would then have to approach Bergen County Engineering because this is a County road.  Mayor Hache asked if the narrowing of each land of traffic would have the unintended consequence of slowing things down.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that it would, and there would also be clear markings.  Visual narrowing has proven to lower the speeds of motorists.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that when they met with the County about that corridor, this appears to be consistent with that effort.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that he believes it is consistent with some of the County’s thoughts, but he would still like them to opine upon it if the Village Council would like to move forward with this.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if this in anyway impacts the other plan.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that he thinks it can, but he would want to talk to the County Engineering staff to see their thoughts on it.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she knows that a lot of this is a result of Starbucks.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that it was Starbucks and Ben and Jerry’s.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the cones created a problem for Ben and Jerry’s.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they have met with Starbucks and they understand the severity of the Village’s concerns with the traffic there.  If this was to be adopted, exiting traffic would still only be allowed to make a right turn exiting.  Mayor Hache stated that the problem is going to be how to paint straight lines on a crooked road.

Councilman Sedon stated that he knew they had talked about adding parking on Franklin Avenue when it gets repaved.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that it would effect this area, and the other thing that could work in their favor is that they could stripe this now and give it a trial run before the road gets resurfaced in the coming years.  He added that if the County agrees with the Village Council he would like to get this done as soon as possible.

Councilman Voigt asked about the width of the center lane and if it would be consistent with the other two lanes.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they have it as 11 feet for the center turning lane and 12.5 feet for the outer lanes.  Councilman Voigt asked about the in and out for Ben and Jerry’s and also for the North Walnut Street, it looks like you can go left and right out of Ben and Jerrys and out of North Walnut Street Parking Lot.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that Ben and Jerry’s off Franklin is enter only, and for North Walnut Street Parking Lot they can look at it but right now you can exit left or right but they would have to look at it as he doesn’t think that parking lot has a lot of turnover.  Councilman Voigt stated that he assumed that TD Bank and Valley National Bank was right only.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they were right only.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if it was time to do a traffic count at this point because they have some studies from Planning Board in the past and it seems to her that traffic is getting worse and it might be a good time to do an interim count because all of those at the other end of Franklin at the corner of Broad have a look-back count that they would have to do so they should have these numbers on hand.  Sergeant Chuck stated that they could certainly do it, but he thinks this management plan is going to help.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she agreed. 

Ms. Mailander asked that the Village Council was in agreement that they would do a traffic count and then reach out to the County about getting this work done.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if Mr. Rutishauser had any idea on how long it would take for this work to get approved.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that if the Village Council would adopt a resolution at next week’s meeting because then the full weight of their voices can be seen by the County and then he would make the recommendation and get their concurrence as soon as possible.

 

  1. Operations

 

  1. Authorize Access to North Walnut Street Parking Lot – Monitoring Wells

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the owner of the Town Garage property on Franklin Avenue had hired Brinkerhoff Environmental Services who wanted to sample the Village’s monitoring wells in the North Walnut Street parking lot.  Mr. Rogers had indicated that there has to be a reason given by the company, so the Village has received an email and their indication is that ground water flows from their client’s site toward the North Walnut Street redevelopment district and access to the Village’s wells would allow them to avoid installing additional wells on the Village’s property.  They are required to delineate the extent of the plume on their client’s property per NJDEP regulations.  Mr. Rogers stated that is sufficient.

 

  1. North Walnut Street Traffic Calming

 

Ms. Mailander stated that there was a traffic study done on North Walnut Street between May 21st and 26th of this year.  Approximately 12,000 cars during that week were on North Walnut Street.  Just over 700 cars were traveling at speeds above 36 mph, 80 cars were going over 40 mph, the average speed was about 31 mph, there were less than 400 cars traveling 15 mph or less.  There was more traffic traveling south towards the CBD than north, and that’s where the speeding was taking place, for the most part.

Ms. Mailander added that a traffic study was also completed on North Walnut Street last June, and the numbers were almost identical.  They are going to propose some engineering solutions, and one of them is a permanent speed sign midway between Robinson Lane and Franklin because that is where the speeding going towards the CBD is taking place.

Mr. Rutishauser stated that they looked at a number of traffic improvement suggestions and have had a number of discussions at the Citizen Safety Advisory Committee.  Some ideas and suggestions were not looked at in favor by the residents.  One of the suggestions they did look at is a solar powered sign that will flash the speed limit of the approaching car.  They do have them in some of the school zones, and it gives a very quick feedback of your speed.  He added that Sergeant Chuck made a recommendation that they can program it to only flash up to a certain speed limit.  Sergeant Chuck stated that this recommendation encourages trial and error, because some people might try to beat their speed the next time.  Ms. Mailander added that in addition to the speed sign, they will have increased enforcement on the street, but they are confident that this will help to reduce the speeding.  There are other measures they could take which includes a double yellow line down the street.  The neighbors don’t want this, so they would like to try the speed sign and see how it works.

Councilman Voigt asked if Sergeant Chuck would have access to the data from the sign over a period of time.  Sergeant Chuck stated that he would.  Councilman Voigt asked if this would be on a pole or a telephone pole.  Sergeant Chuck stated that Signal Division would erect its own pole.  Councilman Voigt asked how obtrusive this sign would be, such as would it be flashing and bother a neighbor.  Sergeant Chuck stated that they automatically have daytime and nighttime settings, but there would definitely be a yellow light flashing when a car drives down the street.  Councilman Voigt asked if that was alright for the neighbors and he received a response from the neighbors.

Mayor Hache stated that he circulated some information to the residents and wanted to make sure that it was something that they were okay with.  Ralph Edelman, 106 North Walnut Street, stated that he thought it was a great first step and they really appreciated it.  Two weeks ago, they were talking about lowering the speed limit and he was curious what the feedback was.  He added that he had some other ideas that could maybe be built upon later, adding that there is an initiative called Vision Zero which is about reducing traffic fatalities.  If the road does get repaved, they would love to see crosswalks around Robinson, and the yellow line solution to narrow the line of vision.  A more aesthetic way of doing that would be to paint a bike lane which may be a way to calm traffic.

Councilman Voigt stated that there is a huge volume of cars on that street.  Sergeant Chuck stated that it is actually closer to 14,000 cars a day.  Councilman Voigt stated that is one of the higher volume streets that we have in the town.  Sergeant Chuck stated for a tertiary road it is high, but Oak Street is almost four times that.  Councilman Voigt stated that maybe they can find a way to lessen the volume.  Sergeant Chuck stated that it is an access point from a main road to downtown.  There are a lot of homes on that street also, so how many times are people leaving their homes every day.  He added that they did this over a holiday weekend which probably increased the number because it was such a nice weekend, but it probably wouldn’t make a huge difference in this count.  Councilman Voigt stated that it may be something they could think about in Citizens Safety Advisory Committee to reduce volume on that street.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if Sergeant Chuck had the detailed study on this and if the Village Council could obtain a copy so she could understand the hours.  Sergeant Chuck stated that he would share that.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the high speed travel is a problem all through Ridgewood.  She added that while they are looking at this and figuring out how to slow folks down, she thinks that at some point they need to look at the entire Village.  She added that they have to look at a Village-wide solution.  Sergeant Chuck stated that the Chief is in agreement, and she just bolstered the Traffic Bureau with at least one officer dedicated to enforcement all day long, which is supplemented by Patrol Officers.  He added that is directly related to the concerns they have been hearing.

Mr. Edelman stated that in terms of reducing volumes of traffic, there are three entrances to Stop and Shop, and suggested restricting the entrance on North Walnut Street to commercial only or restrict it to just enter or exit.  He added that there is a lot of traffic coming out of there.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that when she goes to Stop and Shop depending on the time of day, she can no longer make the left onto Cottage.  So she either has to go out to the right on Cottage and then make a left onto Franklin, or go out of the Franklin exit and make the left.  Sometimes Franklin is too crazy to make the left, so she oftentimes goes out onto Walnut so she can get home and not feel like she’s in a compromised position making a left.  She said there are two perspectives.  Mr. Edelman stated that a lot of the things the proposed are things that can be implemented town wide and he doesn’t think a lot of that costs a lot of money.  He added that he was curious what the pushback was to reducing the speed limit.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they had deployed the speed trailer for the count.  Sergeant Chuck stated that they like to get as natural raw data as possible, so when they are planning to place the speed counters they wipe police from the area.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they were going to deploy that in the interim as it would give some real information.  Sergeant Chuck stated that it is absolutely available, but it is at the Train Station and they put the curb around it but they would get it over there soon.

 

  1. Alternate Court Administrator

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they did a resolution designating Kimberly McWilliams as the Acting Court Administrator for the Ridgewood Municipal Court, and the rate was $35 an hour.  At the time of adoption of the resolution, Maria Doerr was not designated in a reciprocal agreement with Glen Rock.  Kim McWilliams has now been appointed as Municipal Court Administrator for the Wyckoff Municipal Court, as a result of a new shared services agreement with Glen Rock and has designated Maria Doerr as Acting Municipal Court Administrator for the Wyckoff Municipal Court.  Now that there is a reciprocal agreement in place, she has drafted a new resolution which omits compensation for the emergent services.  Ms. Mailander added that she doesn’t know that it has ever happened that our Municipal and Deputy Court Administrators were not available, but now it will work through a barter system and they will not be charged by the alternate designee.

 

  1. Ordinance to Adopt New FEMA/FIRM Maps

 

Mr. Rutishauser stated that FEMA/FIRM have finally issued new flood maps for the Village that will be effective August 28th this year.  The changes for the Village will be very minor.  The big fear they have are that the last time this occurred, a lot of the properties with a Letter of Map Amendment without the structures in the flood plains that didn’t need flood insurance were all tossed out and they have to work with the US Representatives to get them reestablished.  The ordinance before the Village Council is a total rewrite of the Village of Ridgewood flood ordinance in the code based on what the DEP has issued for communities to adopt.  The flood insurance program is significantly in arrears and the flood insurance program is looking at tightening up what people have that could be effected by a flood.

Councilwoman Walsh asked if any new properties were impacted by the new flood map that were not in the flood zone prior.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that there may be a few properties that the flood reach has now touched and are enjoined, but they haven’t identified those yet.  Councilwoman Walsh asked if they had a responsibility to notify those property owners.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they don’t, an individual only needs flood insurance under specific circumstances, if you have a mortgage a lender will require it.  He added that they do know of residents that are in flood hazard areas that do not have flood insurance because they have inherited their properties, do not have a mortgage, and have decided to take that risk upon themselves.  The properties that have been put into the flood hazard area; those lenders would be contacting the homeowners.  If they have questions, they would encourage them to come to Engineering.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she saw that there was a grievance period where they could challenge.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that the challenge requires getting a surveyor to do elevations.  FEMA/FIRM does a much higher level review and there may be individual conditions that a homeowner has that elevates them out of the flood region and if they can prove that through a survey at their own cost, a homeowner may be able to get a LOMA.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked about the Bergen County Court of Appeals being designated to hear and decide appeals and request for variances from the requirements of this ordinance.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that he formulated that section in coordination with Tom Yotka, as the Village dissolved the Village’s Board of Appeals and went to the County.  So they were having the County Board of Appeals in this ordinance be the entity of last resort for the individual that does not agree with the determination of the engineer’s office or the construction official’s office.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked for clarification on the variance piece.  Mr. Rogers stated that he didn’t think they were talking about a variance under municipal land use law, but they were talking about a deviation from the map itself and the designations.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if that was something for a construction board to handle.  Mr. Rogers stated that there wasn’t any other body in this municipality that can handle that type of appeal.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they had to provide a venue where someone could appeal that determination and the Bergen County Court of Appeal is the most suitable venue for something for that.  Ms. Mailander added that they have to adopt it prior to the end of August.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that the state DEP would require a copy to be submitted to them to show that the Village has satisfied its requirements.

 

  1. 2020 Village Calendar Theme

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they had a couple of suggestions for the 2020 calendar theme.  One is trees which the Shade Tree Commission has proposed.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that when she learned of the Shade Tree Commission idea, she loved it and always finds that the pictures are always muddy and she thought it might be a benefit to use the free line art that is available and to take a different approach with the images.  Ms. Mailander stated that the final recommendation was hidden or not so hidden treasures of the Village.

Councilwoman Knudsen added that she wanted to elaborate on Jeanne Epiphan’s comments, adding that she isn’t good with plants but one thing Jeanne explained was native and invasive species and the impact on the birds.  There is a whole cycle that goes on, so she thought that was a good reason to incorporate her ideas with Shade Tree.  She added that from an educational perspective it was important to understand what the invasive species are doing to our environment.

Councilman Voigt stated that he had a couple of suggestions, such as places of worship, and unique homes of Ridgewood.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she liked the hidden idea because often someone will ask have you ever seen this, and there are urban legends in Ridgewood which might be fun for people to get involved in.  People can pick locations and send them in.  Councilman Sedon added that he was partial to both tree ideas, adding that there were heritage trees and merging that with some line art to bring in some focus and detail might be interesting.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that Ms. Epiphan asked if Kings Pond is a hidden treasure.  She isolated the different species that could be found at each of the different locations.  She added that the Shade Tree Commission has done an incredible job in the Village bringing attention to the importance of the tree canopy and they have learned a lot about invasive species that she thinks should be imparted to the larger community.

Mayor Hache added that he likes them all, but definitely the quality of the pictures are a problem so he would like to see if they could do something.  Ms. Mailander added that color or nicer paper increases cost.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that working with what they are working with, the front cover because of the quality of the glossier paper always makes it sharper, but when you go into the calendar you always find a muddiness.  Mayor Hache asked if they could get a mockup of what it would look like to have one versus another.  He suggested using two or three themes and seeing which one looks best.  Ms. Mailander stated that they could do this, but they would have to pay the printer.  Mayor Hache asked to just see the pictures of the concepts over one or two pages.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that she sent samples of the work from Ms. Epiphan, and line art is essentially coloring pages so there is an opportunity to make the calendar more of an experience.

 

  1. REVIEW OF JUNE 12, 2019 PUBLIC MEETING AGENDA

Ms. Jackson stated that this was a review of the June 12, 2019 Public Meeting Agenda.

Proclamations include: Bee City USA National Pollinator Week.

Resolutions for Ridgewood Water: Award Contract – Roof Repairs for Various Ridgewood Water Properties; Award Contract Under State Contract – Geographic Information System for Data Migration; and Award Contract Under Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing Contract – 2019 Ford Escape.

The following ordinances are scheduled for introduction:  3723 – Amend Chapter 190 – Land Use and Development – Certain Illuminated Signs in the Central Business District; 3724 – Amend Chapter 265 – Vehicles and Traffic – Ridgewood Parking Permits to Include Ridgewood CBD Building Owners with Offices in Their Own Building; 3725 – Amend Chapter 145 – Fees – Fees for Ridgewood Parking Permits for Central Business District Building Owners with Offices in their Own Buildings; 3726 – Amend Outdoor Café Fees – 2019 & 2020; 3727 – Amend Chapter 265 Vehicles and Traffic – Parking Restrictions on Sherman Place; 3728 – Amend Chapter 265 – Vehicles and Traffic – Parking Restrictions on Monte Vista Avenue; 3729 – Amend Chapter 154 – Flood Damage Prevention; 3730 – Reappropriate Funding in Capital Ordinance – Renovation of Tree Wells in Central Business District to Conducting a Tree Inventory; and 3731 – Establish Turn Lane on Franklin Avenue.

Ordinances for Public Hearing include: 3722 – Prohibit Use of Single Use Plastic Carry-Out Bags.

Resolutions include: Waive Fourth of July Vendor Fees; Grant Permission to Fireworks Company for Fireworks Display; Title 59 Approval – Disposal of Grass Clippings; Award Contract – Disposal of Grass Clippings; Title 59 Approval – Surface Restoration of West Façade of Village Hall; Award Contract – Surface Restoration of West Façade of Village Hall; Title 59 Approval – Underground Storage Tank System Repair; Award Contract – Underground Storage Tank System Repair; Award Contract Under State Contract – Geographic Information Systems for Various Departments; Award Contract Under State Contract  - Bulletproof Vests; Award Contract Under Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing Contract – Stump Grinder – Parks Department; Award Contract Under Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing Contract – 2019 Ford F250 Pickup Truck – Public Works; Award Contract Under Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing Contract – On-line Auction Services; Award Contract Under National Cooperative Agreement – Caterpillar Backhoe – Signal and Water Pollution Control Divisions; Award Contract Under National Cooperative Agreement – Roll-off Truck with Salter – Street Division; Award Contract Under Houston-Galveston Cooperative Purchasing Agreement – 2020 Fire Pumper; Award Contract Under Cooperative Purchasing Agreement – Rental of Interim Sewage Transfer Pumps – Andover Pump Station; Award Contract Under Cooperative Purchasing Agreement – Bucket Truck Chassis – Parks Department; Award Contract Under Cooperative Purchasing Agreement – Bucket Truck Aerial Lift – Parks Department; Award Partial Contract – Sidewalks on West Glen Avenue; Award Professional Services Contract – Certified Lake Manager – Dredging of Kings Pond; Appoint Village Attorney; Appoint Village Bond Attorney; Appoint Village Labor Attorney; Appoint Village Prosecutor and Assistant Village Prosecutor; Appoint Public Defender; Appoint Alternate Court Administrator; Appoint Community Development Representative; Appoint Representative to Open Space Trust Regional Committee; Appoint Members to Planning Board; Appoint Members to Zoning Board of Adjustment; Appoint Member to Stigma Free Task Force; Appoint Members to the Ridgewood Environmental Advisory Committee; Appoint Members to the Parks, Recreation, and Conservation Board; Appoint Members to the Green Team Advisory Committee; Allocation of Affordable Housing Trust Fund Money to The United Way for The Enclave Special Needs Housing; Extend Suspension of Ordinance for Certain Illuminated Signs in Central Business District; Authorize Tax Collector to Charge for Mailing of Tax Sale Notices; Declare Property Surplus – 2000 Packer Truck – Recycling Division; Authorize Access to North Walnut Street Parking Lot Monitoring Wells; Authorize Village of Ridgewood to be a New Jersey Future Aging Friendly Community; Endorse Bergen County Historic Preservation Grant – James Rose Center; Accept Donation – Flagpole at Public Forum Space of Memorial Park at Van Neste Square; Authorize Release of Maintenance Bond – 44 Godwin Avenue; Approve 2019-2020 Renewals of Liquor Licenses; and Appoint Village Councilmembers as Liaisons to Various Boards and Committees.

 

Mayor Hache added that this Saturday at 10:00 A.M. at Van Neste Square is the Gun Violence Awareness, wear orange, and the High School students are driving this there will be speaks and musical performances.

 

  1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

Anne Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that she wanted to echo what Ms. Mailander said about Graydon opening, they were there Sunday and it was beautiful, the snack bar is really nice and they have salads.  Councilman Sedon was there, and the pool looked great and it was nice to have it open again.  She added that last year or the current year there was a whole page of errors and corrections, holidays that were missed or duplicated, and she asked that they consider having someone that is a professional proofreader check it because more than the drawings or photos is the accuracy of the content. 

Councilwoman Knudsen added that part of the reason they brought up the theme was they made a determination that the calendar should be ready much earlier, so in speaking with Ms. Mailander they made the decision to start the process earlier on to make sure that those errors are address beforehand.

  1. RESOLUTION TO GO INTO CLOSED SESSION

 

Deputy Village Clerk Donna Jackson read Resolution #19-154 to go into Closed Session as follows:

  1. ADJOURNMENT

 

There being no further business to come before the Village Council, on a motion by Councilman Voigt, seconded by Councilwoman Knudsen, and carried unanimously by voice vote, the Village Council’s Work Session was adjourned at 10:01 P.M.

______________________________

                                                                                                  Ramon M. Hache, Sr.                                  

                                                                                                             Mayor                                     

______________________________

              Donna M. Jackson

           Deputy Village Clerk

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A REGULAR WORK SESSION OF THE VILLAGE COUNCIL OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD HELD IN THE SYDNEY V. STOLDT, JR. COURT ROOM OF THE RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE HALL, 131 NORTH MAPLE AVENUE, RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY ON JUNE 5, 2019 AT 7:30 P.M.

 

  1. CALL TO ORDER – OPEN PUBLIC MEETINGS ACT – ROLL CALL – FLAG    SALUTE

Mayor Hache called the meeting to order at 7:30 P.M. and read the Statement of Compliance with the Open Public Meetings Act.  At roll call the following were present: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache.  Also present were Heather Mailander, Village Manager/Village Clerk; Matthew Rogers, Village Attorney; and Donna Jackson, Deputy Village Clerk. 

Mayor Hache led those in attendance in the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag as well as in a Moment of Silence to honor the brave men and women serving in our armed forces and all our first responders.

  1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

Paul Evers, 27 Sherman Place, stated that he was here in reference to the parking on Sherman Place.  It is a small dead end street between Washington Avenue and Ridgewood Avenue.  A professional building on Ridgewood Avenue was allowed to expand which closed off their entry and exit and forced an entry and exit onto Sherman Place.  This has caused Sherman Place to become an extension of their parking facilities, and the traffic situation has degraded.  For the last five years the neighborhood has been communicating to the Village Council that there has been issues with safety, parking, congestion, and they feel that it is time to act. 

Mr. Evers stated that a few months ago they appreciated the Village Council’s recommendation, but they didn’t agree with the recommendation and were asked to provide a counterproposal including maps, documentation, and pictures.  He added that they were excited to submit it but were disappointed that their recommendations weren’t included in the proposal that is being presented today.  Their neighbors on South Sherman and Garfield are concerned that the problem is just going to be pushed down to their streets.

Mr. Evers stated that he was asking that they hold off voting on this proposal and convene a meeting of the neighborhood with the town to come up with a proposal that solves the root cause of the problem and that they can all agree to.

Paul White, 152 Woodside Avenue, stated that he and his wife have lived in the Vilage for 40 years.  He used to be a runner and then a biker, and the roads are in terrible condition.  He added that he has emailed the Village Council, called the Village Manager and the Engineering Department.  He stated that the Mayor told him that $2 million had been spent on the roads, but more needs to be done.  When he goes down from his house to the County park and takes Prospect, it is a mess.  When you turn off Woodside it is a disgrace, and he was told by his neighbor that there was a work crew that had attempted to fill in potholes.  He added that he tried to go down Spring and it is as bad, if not worse.  Mr. White added that he wanted to encourage the Village Council to find more resources as he has never seen the roads in this kind of shape.  He understands the budgetary pressure, but the roads are in bad shape and it needs to be addressed.

Chris Reid, 112 Stanley Place, stated that he agreed with Mr. Evers, and that you can only get to his house on Sherman Place and he would love if the town had a sub-committee to discuss parking issues in the neighborhood.  If the neighbors could get together and discuss things with someone from the town that would be incredible and it can probably be used as a template for other areas in the town.

Kim Schwartz, 56 Sherman Place, stated that she agreed with Mr. Evers and Mr. Reid about the Sherman parking issue.  There needs to be a sub-committee and they don’t want to push this problem down the road.  There are a lot of issues there and they need to study this before they just do something.

Jen Schnell, 43 Sherman Place, stated that she was here to ask for the formation of a subcommittee to address the parking on Sherman Place as well as the entire George Washington Middle School neighborhood.

Rolf Edelman, 106 North Walnut Street, stated that they do have some good ideas to follow up on Councilman Voigt’s ideas and they would like to follow up on his proposal and let the Village Council know that they are here.

There were no additional comments from the public.

Mayor Hache stated that the Village Council was not voting on anything tonight, they were just having a discussion.  He liked the idea of a subcommittee of having residents and Village staff and perhaps a couple of members of the Village Council, but they would discuss later.

  1. MANAGERS REPORT

Graydon Pool – Ms. Mailander stated that Graydon Pool opened on Saturday, June 1st.  The early season weekend hours are from 10:00 A.M. to 7:30 P.M.  Weekday hours are noon to 7:30 P.M.  Residents can purchase memberships in person at the pool office or a ridgewoodnj.net/ communitypass.  Regular season begins June 24th through August 11th, and then the late season is August 12th to September 2nd.  Various program offerings and amenities include spray fountains, Adirondack chairs, a shade system, recreational game area, picnic area with tables and charcoal grills Wi-Fi accessibility, the Waterside Café from noon to 7:00 P.M., swim lessons, story time under the pavilion, a lending library, and special events include movie nights, concerts and more.

Kasschau Memorial Shell – Ms. Mailander stated that the Kasschau Memorial Shell located on Veterans Field behind the Library, will begin its season tomorrow night.  Free live concert popular music concerts are presented on Tuesday and Thursday nights at 8:00 P.M. in June, July and August.  Bring a chair or a blanket and enjoy these concerts under the stars.  This program is presented due to the generous sponsorship of several local businesses and the Village of Ridgewood.  The Senior Bus will be available for transportation to several of these performances.  If you are an older resident and wish to go to one of these performances please call 201-670-5500 extension 203 for details and for which performances they will have the bus available.

 

Dog Licenses – Ms. Mailander stated that dog licenses are due for renewal in the month of June.  After July 1st a $20 late fee will be charged.  Dog owners were reminded by an email or mailing to complete the renewal form and to return it with a check to the Health Department.  Office hours are 8:30 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. Monday to Friday.

 

Ridgewood Guild – Ms. Mailander stated that the Ridgewood Guild provides Movies Under the Stars on Wednesday nights twice a month in June, July, and August in Memorial Park at Van Neste Square at sundown.  The Postman Always Rings Twice will be shown on June 12th, and The Wizard of Oz on June 26th.  Bring a chair or a blanket and enjoy the show.

 

Art in the Park – The Ridgewood Guild also sponsor three Art in the Parks evening events.  Friday, June 7th, July 12th and August 2nd.  Take a stroll in the park and enjoy music and artwork.  Art for sale those evenings have proceeds benefitting the Ridgewood Guild.

 

Age Friendly Introduction to the Senior Bus –  Ms. Mailander stated that Age Friendly Ridgewood sponsored an Introduction to the Senior Bus last week with morning and afternoon bus rides provided for ten residents each trip to learn more about our Central Business District and other local activities.  Along the route Ridgewood representatives me the bus and spoke with the riders, sharing fun facts and providing bags with additional information.  Please call 201-670-5500 extension 203.

 

Registration for Summer Day Camp – Ms. Mailander stated that registration for summer day camp has started and will be open until the cutoff on June 10th, after that time there is an additional $50 fee.  Day Camp begins Tuesday, June 25th.

 

Household Hazardous Waste Collection – Ms. Mailander stated that Sunday June 23rd from 9:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. Bergen County Utilities Authority will collect Household Hazardous Waste at Bergen Community College on Paramus Road in Paramus rain or shine.  Bergen County residency is required.

 

Parking in Village-Owned Lots after 3:00 P.M. – Ms. Mailander reminded residents that parking in all Village-owned parking lots after 3:00 P.M. does not require a permit.  There are still time restrictions of three hours and parking fees are still in effect.

 

  1. COUNCIL REPORTS

Community Center Advisory Board – Councilman Voigt stated that the Community Center Advisory Board met last week.  Don Liebrich is stepping down as chair of the CCAB, and they would like to thank him for his service as he has been doing so for four years. 

On May 31st, Ridgewood became the 355th community in the US to be enrolled in the AARP Network of Age Friendly Communities.  This network encourages municipalities to prepare for the rapid aging of the U.S. population.  Councilman Voigt stated that Age Friendly Ridgewood under the leadership of Sheila Brogan, Beth Abbot, Sue Ulrich and Deanna Schablick have done a really nice job and should be congratulated for all they have done.  President of the AARP, Livell Jones and Senior Program Specialist, Bridget Quinn were on hand to present the award to Mayor Hache.  Julia Strombus, Program Director for the Henry and Marilyn Taub Foundation were also present.  The Taub Foundation has been a huge contributor to Age Friendly Ridgewood and they thank them very much.

June 1st Age Friendly hosted a senior breakfast at Graydon Pool, it was attended by over 70 seniors and they had a great time.  Music, food and friendship.  He thanked Sheila Brogan, Beth Abbot, Sue Ulrich and Deanna Schablick for coordinating this.

Tuesday June 11th there will be a ArtBeat concert at the Kasschau Shell, acapella, rock, and blues students will be there for entertainment.

Councilman Voigt added that they spoke about West Glen, and Mr. Rutishauser stated that they would continue to pave the sidewalk west of Hillcrest up the hill.  They will also fix Union Street with more prominent one way signage and one way turn signs out of the physician’s office.

Councilman Voigt added that Starbucks coffee on Franklin has continued issues, and they will have a person there to help move the traffic into the property and will put an additional sign on the left side of the exit so drivers know to turn right instead of left.

Councilman Voigt stated that there was a request from a resident on Walthery Avenue that cars are driving at excessive speeds on that road, which Ms. Mailander has agreed to look into.  Monte Vista is something they will also talk about.

Planning Board – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Planning Board met last night.  There were a couple zoning reviews.  One was to correct an inconsistency in Chapter 251 as it relates to pools, so they are just cleaning up some inconsistencies.  Also, a review of a zoning ordinance to extend the historic Central Business District to include the bus structure.  This will allow the Village to seek grant opportunities and to communicate with SHPO and make certain that the award winning design is preserved for future generations.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she had an email from a resident that warrants discussion.  She was not here at the May 22nd meeting and evidently there was an exchange regarding the November versus April vote on the Board of Election.  Councilman Voigt indicated that if the BOE budget exceeded 2% it would automatically kick in a vote.  There was an interpretation that meant that if the BOE budget exceeded a 2% cap then there would be a vote in November and that is not necessarily true.  Because of exceptions, exemptions, and the use of CAP Bank, the increase could be significantly higher than 2% and there would be no budget vote necessarily in November.  April elections guarantee that regardless of what the budget increase is, there will always be a vote.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Village Council for years has not gone over their 2% and have banked the difference in the CAP Bank which sits for three years and then expires.  They could take that CAP Bank at any time and increase the tax levy.  She added that it was important to understand that just because the BOE exceeds a 2% necessarily does not guarantee a vote.  It depends on what that overage is made by.

Mr. Rogers stated that he gave a comment that 2% exceeding would warrant a vote, but he could do some research and report back next week.

Pride Month Celebration – Mayor Hache stated that on June 1st they had a celebration of Pride Month, celebrating Ridgewood’s diversity at Memorial Park at Van Neste Square.  They raised the Pride flag and there was a lot of support from the community and from our elected and public officials throughout the state.  Each one brought a unique perspective, and the support was so strong and overwhelming it was great to be a part of Ridgewood that day.  There were a lot of volunteers that stepped up and the weather couldn’t have been any better.

Roadway Paving – Mayor Hache stated that regarding the conditions of the roads we have had brutal winters and the progress in paving is also slowed down by the wet weather.  That makes it very difficult to pave our road, but the money is there and the paving schedule is on the Village website.  They didn’t make it through last year’s schedule because of the weather, but he appreciates resident’s patience with this as they move through the process and the timeline.

 

  1. DISCUSSION

 

  1. Ridgewood Water - None

 

  1. Parking

 

  1. Parking on Sherman Place

 

Ms. Mailander asked Mr. Rutishauser and Sergeant Jay Chuck to please come up to discuss this with the Village Council.  As the residents mentioned, they do have a challenge because their street has nearly become the parking lot for the professional building. 

Mr. Rutishauser stated that Sherman Place is a very short street, and they were concerned with the portion just north of Washington Place.  There is a medical office building on West Ridgewood Avenue that has an exit driveway onto Sherman Place.  The intensity of use in the office building has increased, resulting in more vehicular traffic.  The current suggestion they have is to make the traffic in the southbound direction no parking and allow parking in the northbound direction.  They have recently put up some signage there.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked that they took the parking on the east side of the road and left parking there for two hours, and then on the west side of the road removed parking and then changed it so there was no U-turn.  There is also the Do Not Enter sign.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that the Do Not Enter sign refers to the driveway of the office building, which is one way and occasionally people ignore that and cut through there, hence the reason for the sign.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that if she is facing north, parked on the east side of the road, if she can’t make a U-turn she can’t get out of the street.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that was something that was discussed at previous meetings and it seemed to be the decision of the Village Council to not have that U-turn ordinance.  It was still a discussion item, and if the Village Council feels it’s not warranted, they can eliminate it from the ordinance.  He added that tonight, he would like to get a feel for what the Village Council and residents would like on that street and then they can prepare an ordinance accordingly.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she has spoken to a lot of the residents and has read their emails, and several weeks ago suggested to one of the residents that an ad-hoc committee be organized. We don’t want a situation as similar to Pomander where there was a shift of cars that migrated from one street to another.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they see that all too often in the Village.  The parkers move to the next block where there isn’t a restriction.  He added that it is a constant battle and it is tough to gauge how far you would have to create an area to get them to go further away.

Councilwoman Knudsen wondered if she asked for the resolution of approval for the office building when it occurred 30 years ago. Mr. Rutishauser stated that he thinks they have looked for it.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it might be useful to have that and see if there is any availability of the original site plan and the resolution.  If there was a representation that there was X amount of activity going on there and a representation of anticipated vehicular activity, they might have something in there.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that he does feel that the office building has intensified its use which could be due to a change in type of physician.  From his experience, the resolutions of 30 years ago are not as detailed as they are currently, but they would look for the file.

Councilman Sedon stated that he wanted to know how the U-turn would work for people to get out of North Sherman.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they could make a 3-point turn if there is room.  Councilman Sedon stated that he thought there would be a value in getting together with residents because they have experience from living there but then it may also be helpful for Mr. Rutishauser to explain his position, as well, because there may be specific guidelines that have to be followed.

Mayor Hache asked Councilman Voigt if there was any further discussion in CSAC.  Councilman Voigt stated that as it related to this situation there was no further discussion but he did have a couple of questions.  He asked Sergeant Chuck about parking spaces on Ridgewood Avenue and if they were used at all.  Sergeant Chuck stated that they were used all day.  Councilman Voigt asked the types of businesses that can be there with regard to the zoning, are they sure that the types of businesses that can be there are there.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that he would have to take a look at it as he didn’t have the zone committed to memory.  Councilman Voigt stated that it seems like there is a fairly high intensity use of those offices and he wanted to make sure that whoever was in there was compliant with what was supposed to be there.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that she believes they saw a site plan at CSAC a few years ago, and there is a garbage receptacle there that is not on the original plan and that the site plan did show exit only and that there was not a two way.  She added that the challenge with this block is that it is not just that building, as it’s also school parking and there has to be a balance for the residents.  The challenge is restricting from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. then the residents don’t get to use the road as well.  She stated that with the new sign they would make sure that there is only exit, but when they exit it takes up the west side of the road but then there are only a couple of parking spots there.  Sergeant Chuck stated that it has to be 50 feet on the stop sign side and 25 feet on the other side.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that without parking on the west side there would only be a couple of spaces that would be available on the east curb.  Sergeant Chuck stated that you would be cutting the parking in half.  Councilwoman Walsh asked how do you find the balance because if you count residents, there are 11 homes.  Even if you had only one spot for them to have a spot for a guest than anybody else would be pushed onto the other streets.  So, she wasn’t sure how to find the balance other than cutting down the amount of spots there.

Mayor Hache stated that it isn’t easy, but instead of trying to find the situation that is just right, the idea of creating the sub-committee to get a working committee with Village professionals and two Village Council members is the next step.  He asked for anyone who would like to volunteer for the subcommittee to write to the Village Council.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if the Do Not Enter sign that was installed as enforceable, and who had jurisdiction over that.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that it is a regulatory sign and he believes it can be enforced.  Sergeant Chuck stated that was unenforceable because it is a Do Not Enter sign on private property.  The one concern that the Police Department has is the no U-turn, as they look at the street 360 degrees and that is just a problem of the overuse of the commercial space, but they think about grandmas visiting, landscapers, are coming from Washington Place and if you remove U-turn restrictions you can’t leave the road.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the experience on her street, Bogart, Pomander, and Sherman, the uniqueness of these neighborhoods is best understood by the residents and neighbors and they typically come up with the best solutions, so she supports letting them help work on this as a more comprehensive approach.

Ms. Mailander asked for whoever wants to be a spokesperson to contact her, so they will be the one who will email and notify the other neighbors on the street.  They will set up a meeting internally with two Councilmembers, neighbors, and the professionals to come up with the best solution with Sergeant Chuck for the entire area and not just one part of it.

 

  1. Monte Vista Avenue Parking Restrictions

 

Ms. Mailander stated that at the last meeting there was a resident who requested that there be restrictions because there were issues with commuters parking there all day.  There are six cars who park there consistently.  Sergeant Chuck stated that the Police Department looked into that and they are non-Ridgewood residents parking there every day and are going over to the train station.  That neighborhood has time limit restrictions to relieve the neighborhood from long term parking, and so that road is wide enough to have parking on both sides of the street, but if the Village Council is interested in addressing the long term parking they would recommend time limit restrictions.  That neighborhood has two, three, and four hour restrictions, and they find that three hours works the best but four hours gives a lot of time.

Councilman Voigt asked if this related at all to what is going on with parking at the train station, or has this been in existence for a long period of time.  Sergeant Chuck stated that he thinks that it has been in existence for a long period of time and he doesn’t think it is related to the construction.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that currently there is parking on both sides for two hours between 7:00 A.M. and 8:00 P.M. on Madison.  Sergeant Chuck stated that Madison is an anomaly as there are about nine parking restrictions there, which was one of the things that they looked into and sent to Mr. Rutishauser to streamline.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that with all the different time restrictions, if the goal is to dissuade commuters a two or four hour duration would suffice.  A shorter time restriction could be detrimental to the Women’s Club for the events that they have and it is hard to gauge when they have events, but a four hour time limit should cover a great majority of what they do and the people that have to park on the street should be covered.

Mayor Hache asked if anyone from the neighborhood was here, and there wasn’t anyone.  He added that they should discuss this with any residents and make sure that this works and then see what the feedback is before they put it on the agenda to introduce.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she agreed with Mayor Hache and asked if this was a situation where they should send a letter to the residents.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they could do this if the Village Council wished, and they would take the property tax listing and send them a letter.  Councilman Sedon stated that he was a fan of sending letters.

  1. Budget

 

  1. Award Contract – National Cooperative Agreement – Caterpillar Backhoe Signal and Water Pollution Control Divisions

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Village’s Traffic and Signal Division and Water Pollution Control Division share a 1983 Ford Backhoe which is old and ill-suited for repairing sanitary sewer breaks.  They are trying to repair more sanitary sewer breaks in-house as opposed to going to an outside contractor.  The Village joined Sourcewell last year, and working with the Sourcewell vendor Caterpillar through their local dealer, Foley, Inc. they have found a rubber tire backhoe in an amount not to exceed $145,961.  This is under the Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing and their recommendation is to purchase this vehicle, funding is in the 2019 Capital account.

 

  1. Award Contract – Cooperative Purchasing Agreement – 2020 Fire Pumper

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is going to be purchased through the Houston-Galveston Area Cooperative Purchasing Program.  It will replace two of the Fire Department’s current pumpers, a 1994 Pierce fire pumper and a 2000 Pierce fire pumper.  The 2000 Pierce fire pumper will be traded in within 30 days of the purchase order being issued with a $28,000 trade in value.  The 1994 Pierce pumper will be sold on GovDeals when they receive the 2020 pumper.  The cost to purchase the pumper is $478,703.15. 

The fire pumper committee consisted of Captain Schmidt, Lieutenant Zales, Firefighter Jacoby, and Chief Van Goor.  They put together the specifications and it will take one year from the time it is ordered to when it is delivered.  Right now there are five pumpers, and they realized they only use four consistently, so they will all be newer models.  The space in the garage that now occupies the fifth pumper will be occupied by the ambulance that they use to respond to medical emergencies.

 

  1. Authorize Online Auction Service – Sourcewell

 

Ms. Mailander stated that GovDeals is now operating through Sourcewell, so they just need to authorize Sourcewell as the Cooperative Purchasing Agreement so they can continue to use GovDeals.

 

  1. Award Professional Services Contract – Certified Lake Manager

 

Ms. Mailander stated that because the Village is dredging Kings Pond, among the condition in the DEP permit are the careful removal of any fish in the pond prior to lowering the water and dredging the pond and also that the sediment be sampled.  Princeton Hydro out of Ringoes, New Jersey as a Certified Lake Manager on staff and they can do these required items for a contract not to exceed $12,000.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they have had this dredging conversation for a while versus de-snagging, and Jeanne Epiphan had recommended de-snagging.  Her recollection was that the dredging upset the eco-system under the water.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that the Village has dredged this pond a number of times in the past, including in 1999 right before Hurricane Floyd which promptly filled it up and it had to be dredged again.  The pond is a sediment trap and it also was subjected to a very large effluent discharge from the Northwest Bergen Sanitary Sewer that had a significant failure.  He added that de-silting and de-snagging is not allowed to change the elevations of a water body very much, and they are doing much more than that and are digging out all of the muck since 1999.

 

  1. Award Contract – National Cooperative Purchasing Agreement – Roll-Off Truck with Salter – Street Division

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Streets Division has Capital Funds to purchase a new roll-off truck with salter.  The new truck will replace two old Volvo dump trucks that were acquired in 1999.  They were declared surplus and taken out of service in 2015 due to corrosion issues and cracked frames.  They also had issues with their braking systems.  This is going to be purchased through the Sourcewell vendor and their local dealer, Gabrielli Kenworth, in an amount not to exceed $273,506.80.

 

  1. Award Contract – Disposal of Grass Clippings

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this needs to be done annually because they cannot store yard waste materials at the Lakeview Compost Site.  Jersey Mulch Products gave a sole quote.  The Village went out to three companies and only received one back, in an amount not to exceed $90,000 at $20.00 per cubic yard.  This is approximately 4,500 cubic yards of grass clippings and in previous years the Village had anticipated 7,000 cubic yards, so they may have to do an additional award.

Councilman Voigt asked where the additional $40,000 would come from.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that was something that he would discuss with Ms. Mailander and Mr. Rooney.  Right now we are in a very vigorous growing cycle, but maybe the weather will change.  Councilwoman Walsh suggested people mulch the grass and leave it on their lawns.  Councilman Voigt asked why there was a 33% increase this year.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that the solid waste field is under increasing regulations from NJDEP.  One of the vendors the Village contacted wouldn’t give a price, but the Village also couldn’t consider them because they would not give their NJDEP N-Source number.  When the Village gets audited for operations at Lakeview they have to show a complete trail of where the grass clippings go.  Another entity that the Village has done business within the past was also unresponsive.

 

  1. Award Contract – Selective Clearing for Berm Construction at Schedler Property

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they received bids on Thursday, May 23rd.  There were two plan holders eligible to bid and they received one bid.  The only bid received was from Downes Tree Service in the amount of $37,535.  She added that the Village Council received a sketch of the property and where the trees will be removed.  It will be a different look for the neighbors in the area, but this will be to create the berm which will create better shielding from Route 17.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they could confirm that all of the soil that has been deposited there has been tested and certified clean.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they have had tests of the soil.  The construction fill pile generated by the Water Department was tested and found to be satisfactory.  They provided an extensive report from a Licensed Site Remediation Professional (LSRP) for the material from the Dayton project.  He added that he could email this information to the Village Council.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that questions have come up.  Mr. Rutishauser added that it has been tested and confirmed safe for its intended purpose which is a recreational field/facility where the exposure is to the youngest members of our community.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that the trees that are being removed are essentially going to be replaced because the berm that is being created is going to have trees planted on that.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they have an alternating pattern of evergreens and also Councilwoman Walsh requested fencing on top which will be incorporated.  There will be the screening effect of the evergreens and the safety effect of the fence.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if this was consistent with the plan that was developed by the committee that included members of the immediate surrounding neighborhood.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that he believes it is.  Mayor Hache stated that the original estimate didn’t have a line for the selective clearing for berm construction.  He asked if this was adding to what they had originally or was this something else.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that he broke out the work, as he didn’t put it in one large bid because they were able to do that and because he was instructed to get this project moving along.  His office is currently doing the design for the parking lot, and they hope to get that out and the berm construction bid out in the next month or two.  Mayor Hache asked if the tree removal and the free soil were a wash on cost.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that he would have to check that.

 

  1. Release of Maintenance Bond – 44 Godwin Avenue

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this maintenance bond was for work done at Whole Foods in an amount of $30,648.45.  The required site improvements have been satisfactorily completed and the bond can be released, so they need a resolution for next week’s meeting.

 

  1. Award Contract – Cooperative Pricing System – Rental of Interim Sewage Transfer Pumps – Andover Pump Station

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Village of Ridgewood Andover Pump Station recently experienced a failure of its two pumps.  They have ordered two new pumps which should be delivered by the end of this year.  In the interim, due to the failure of the pump station’s two pumps, they needed to install a temporary pump to keep the station operating.  There is a resolution to approve Pumping Services, Inc. to provide rental pumps, hoses, and connections for the rental pump setup.  The cost is approximately $2,356.20 per month.  Also included are service charges, pump setup and when done, pump breakdown costs.  At this time they anticipate a budget of $60,000.  There is money available for this.

Councilman Voigt asked why it was taking so long for the pumps.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they have to be manufactured as they are of a special size and power requirements and are not an off-the-shelf item.  The pumps are also coming from Europe so he is hoping there is no negative impact due to trade tariffs.  Councilman Voigt asked if the rental is an expense.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that it is an expense but it is capital because it’s in the interim.  Ms. Mailander stated that they would confirm that with Mr. Rooney.

 

  1. Award Contract – Surface Restoration of West Façade of Village Hall

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they contacted at least five contractors to come and look at painting that they wanted done.  They received two proposals and there are some concerns with the low proposal regarding the type of cleanup that would occur.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they did an informal solicitation for bids for work to the west façade.  Five vendors were contacted and they received two bids.  Both vendors had language in their proposals where they could be leaving paint chips in the landscaping beds and they felt that was not good.  Both presented that would be the Village’s problem, which would be aesthetics and otherwise.  He added that they checked the quotes with the State law on prevailing wages, and both quotes the vendors would be required to pay their staff prevailing wages and provide certified payrolls to the Village.

Ms. Mailander stated that they would go back to the vendors and discuss that with them and if it is found that they do not pay prevailing wage they will have to go back out to bid.  If they can move forward they will, but if not they will possibly bring it back for July.

 

  1. Award Contract – Underground Storage Tank System Repair

 

Ms. Mailander stated that at Fleet Services one of the alarms went off for one of the underground storage tanks.  Betts Environmental of Butler was hired to investigate the alarm condition.  The tank was taken out of service.  Betts responded to Fleet and excavated the tank area.  Betts found a failure in a vent riser pipe from the interstitial space that permitted ground water to enter the interstitial space causing the alarm condition.  Betts then had an independent agency test the tank to confirm the tank was tight and not leaking.  This was confirmed, and then the tank was brought back online.

The Village’s EJIF insurance fund was notified and they have been apprised of the results and followed up on a request and recommendation to have the waste oil tank tested and a monitoring probe installed.  The system is approximately 32 years old and will need to be replaced in the next few years.  The current system of underground storage tanks were installed after a major spill and subsequent cleanup which also resulted in the Village purchasing a home on Oak Street, at the time.  Ms. Mailander stated that they have a resolution to pay Bett’s for the emergency work they did as well as work requested by the EJIFF to keep the waste oil tank compliant with NJDEP regulations in an amount not to exceed $30,536.  This may be funded partially through insurance.

Councilman Voigt stated that this memo refers to no funds in the capital accounts.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that currently they have no capital funding for replacement of the UST’s so he was glad that they found a problem that could be fixed and did not confirm that the tanks were cracked.  The cost for replacing those tanks is in the range of $400,000 to $600,000.  Ms. Mailander added that this was something they should think about for next year’s capital budget.  Councilman Voigt asked if there were no Capital funds for the fix or for the new tanks.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that definitely not for the new tanks, but for the fix he would defer to Mr. Rooney.  Ms. Mailander added that Mr. Rooney assured her that they would find the funding.  Mr. Rutishauser added that they brought EJIF in because the alarm could mean that the tank was cracked which had happened before.

Councilman Sedon asked if the only breach that occurred was in the interstitial space.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that was correct.

 

  1. Award Contract – Cooperative Purchasing Program – Bucket Truck Chassis – Parks Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for the purchase of a Western Star truck chassis for the Parks Department in the amount of $106,566.  The vendor is Hudson County Motors of Secaucus.  The forestry body and crane for the bucket truck will be provided and assembled by Timmerman Equipment Company.  This was approved in the 2019 Capital Budget.

 

  1. Award Contract – Cooperative Purchasing Program – Bucket Truck Aerial Lift – Parks Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is a purchase under the Educational Services of New Jersey Cooperative Purchasing Contract for an aerial lift in the amount of $170,823.  The vendor is Timmerman Equipment Company, and it was approved in the 2019 Capital Budget.  The truck chassis and the aerial lift will go together and the Parks Department will be using it for their work.

  1. Policy

 

  1. Guidelines for Use of Flagpole in Public Forum Space

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was regarding the flagpole at Memorial Park in Van Neste Square.  Mr. Rogers stated that with the success of the flagpole, someone brought to the attention that they may need to look at some type of ordinance outlining the use of the flagpole, this is in case there is more than one proposed user of the flagpole at one time.  They can set up some guidelines as to how it might be used.  He added that Mr. Rutishauser would get to him regarding the secs of the flagpole and what weight it can take.  They should consider time periods as to how long a particular flag can fly.  Other things to look at are in case there is more than one group that wants to get on at a particular time, how do they discern or decide one from another, so the Village Council has the authority to set up some guidelines with regard to that.

Mr. Rogers suggested setting up an application designating a responsible party and the time periods that they would like to fly the flag.  This was done with holiday displays, and these are things that they can take a look at and put together.  Mayor Hache asked what the timelines are for banners.  Mr. Rogers stated that they have banners at the train trestle that are for non-profits normally, and there are regulations regarding displays.  They don’t have any other regulations out there for banners.  Mayor Hache asked for the public forum space, were there any other guidelines.  Mr. Rogers stated that he didn’t believe there were any regulations.  Ms. Mailander stated that Janet Fricke handles the banners.

Janet Fricke, 223 Woodland Avenue, stated that she was here as a resident tonight and usually because they want to help the non-profits, it is usually a one week commitment but sometimes they could leave it for two weeks.  She added that it could be defined better than it is today.  Councilman Voigt asked Mr. Rogers how this differs from the flagpole at Village Hall.  Mr. Rogers stated that it doesn’t differ, but this is a flagpole at Van Neste Square that can be used for flying flags for various uses.  Councilman Voigt asked if they were doing this here, why weren’t they doing it at Village Hall.  Mr. Rogers stated that would be where they would be flying the flags.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it was a public forum space.  Councilman Voigt clarified that Village Hall is not a public forum space.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she was made aware by email of the flagpole donation, and asked if there was a procedure where they had to accept a gift or donation and she doesn’t know where or when the gift was accepted.  Ms. Mailander stated that she has a resolution on for next week’s meeting for acceptance of the flagpole.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they have already established a time frame for a flag in their mind by virtue of a month.  Mr. Rogers stated that he didn’t think they had.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that Pride Month is during the month of June, so next year they couldn’t just do a week.  Mr. Rogers stated that Pride Month is for the month, Breast Cancer Awareness month is the month of October, so in the consideration of these things in the public forum, they are going to find that these are not regulations that are going to stand as it’s not the purpose of the forum.

Mr. Rogers stated that if you were allowing this to be the public forum flagpole then you have to allow these purposes and you can’t cut it off for a week when the purpose is to fly a Pride flag for the month of June.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they would have to be consistent with the guidelines of a month.  Councilman Sedon suggested saying up to a month.  Mayor Hache asked about the trestle banners, the Village puts them there and if there are not additional requests it could stay there all year.  Mr. Rogers stated that the trestle is not a public forum spot, and they are dealing with a public speech issue here.  Mayor Hache asked if the Village would have a subordinate right to put up what it deemed appropriate for a minimum amount of time as well.  Mr. Rogers stated only if they wanted to regulate it by ordinance, but it’s different from the public forum which is allowing speech to be freely expressed.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they weren’t abridging anyone’s freedom of speech.  Mr. Rogers stated that they were comparing apples and oranges with the trestle and the public forum space.

Mayor Hache stated that in the public forum space, a flag can go up two ways, the Village puts it up or somebody requests it and it goes up, are they then saying that the Village is also subject to a time restriction.  Mr. Rogers asked if the Village owns the pole, or just the space where it was erected as he thought the pole was donated.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the pole was given as a gift and they were accepting the gift.  Mr. Rogers stated that they were accepting the use of the flagpole for that purpose.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they were accepting the gift of the pole and have installed the pole, so the pole now is owned by the Village, and she asked Mr. Rogers if that was accurate.  Mr. Rogers stated that he would assume.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the people who gave the gift are not retaining ownership.  Mr. Rogers stated that he was assuming that the flagpole is there for the purposes of a public forum for the opportunity of speech. 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that to the Mayor’s point, the Village has jurisdiction over the pole, so if they decide during the off times if they want to put up a sign of their choice they could do that.  Mr. Rogers stated that if they regulate the pole for those purposes then that’s fine.  Mayor Hache stated that it was something to look at.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it is a public forum space and so her opinion is that they should make the pole available because that was the intent of it as it was donated.  Mr. Rogers stated that he assumed that this was going to be for public speech.  Mayor Hache stated that specific to the time restrictions, can the Village as owner of the pole, say everyone can put it up for a week, but the Village can put it up for as long as it wants.  Mr. Rogers stated that if they were using it as a public forum that would be restrictive.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that the easiest way to look at the pole is using Pride Month as an example.  It is celebrated for a month and it doesn’t necessarily mean you have to fly the flag for the entire month.  If they say the intent is to let residents express themselves, they are going to give each person a week to do that.  If there is nobody else then they can fly it until the next person, and if there are no requests they can fly the American flag as the default.  Mayor Hache stated that was the conversation with the donors, that the default will always be the American flag.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she didn’t see how they could expect to get a month for the Pride flag if it was going to be an entire month.  Mr. Rogers stated since they can regulate time, place, and manner, they can provide for an extended period and regulate it for one week.  As long as it doesn’t interrupt another request then they can grant the request fully.  He suggested that the application can’t be filed to the Village Clerk’s office no sooner than 60 days ahead of the time but no later than 30 days ahead of time.  He added that you need parameters between the time that you can make the application and the time where you can no longer make the application.  Councilwoman Walsh agreed.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked what if somebody wanted to put up a flag, and then somebody wanted to put up the same flag right after.  She asked if it was the same message that would be on the timeframe, or would it be the actual message that is restricted.  Mr. Rogers stated that they would have to put it up in the application process, adding that even if it is accepted there is the possibility that if something comes in that interrupts that they may be given preference.  He added that they have to find out if they fly two or three flags, adding that they would have size limitations that would adjust how it is used.  Mayor Hache asked if the size of the flag was determined by the size of the pole.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that he submitted a request to Signal to get information from the manufacturer as to what can be flown on this type of pole.  Mayor Hache stated that he read something in New Jersey based on the speed of the wind the size is determined to be five feet by eight feet.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that it is usually a 6:1 ratio on the height of the flag.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if flagpoles need an annual inspection.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that the Signal Division does take a look at them, as periodically they need their lanyards of hoisting mechanisms lubricated, maintained, or replaced.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would meet with Mr. Rutishauser and Mr. Rogers to come up with something and get it back before the Village Council end of June or beginning of July and they can go forward from there.

 

  1. Amending Chapter 190 Land Use Development – Illuminated Signs in Business District and Extend Suspension of Ordinance for Certain Illuminated Signs in Central Business District

 

Ms. Mailander stated that in December the relaxation of the suspension of the ordinance expired and they put it to June 30th.  Now that they have a proposed ordinance from the Planning Board they are going to have to extend it again.  If the Village Council is agreeable to what the Planning Board is proposing, they could introduce it next week, adopt it in July, and it would be effective in the beginning of August, but maybe they should select a date of October 30th so they don’t have to extend it again.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that this is probably one of the most difficult ordinances they have had to work on because of the number of different types of illuminated displays, what the criteria would be for the information that can be on the display.  She added that she thinks at this point, they were comfortable with the way they concluded this and Chairman Joel sent a letter saying that this is the proposed ordinance that the Planning Board agreed to.  She deferred to everyone else because it was so difficult to figure this one out.

Councilwoman Walsh stated that she thinks some illuminated signs may be tasteful and others may not, and once they go down that path what is going to be the approval process for the signage color, and type.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it would be no different than having a T.V. monitor.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that you could, in theory, have a neon sign with a monitor.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that Samba Bowls has theirs on an angle.  She added that they were happy to put it on hold and everyone could take a walk downtown and see what they think about the monitors that are existing and maybe there is additional feedback that would help.  She suggested holding it as you would hate people to get tickets because they aren’t getting it right.

Mayor Hache stated that although he thinks it is an improvement, there is still a lack of specificity and he thinks it needs to be refined a bit more.  Ms. Mailander suggested the Village Council review it on their own and Mr. Rogers would look at it so they could come back with individual recommendations.  The recommendation was that they do the resolution to extend the ordinance enforcement to December 31st.  Ms. Mailander added that this does permit unlettered balloons and banners for a grand opening and they cannot exceed seven days, which she thinks is a good improvement.  Mayor Hache suggested limiting the number of times that balloons can be put up.  Ms. Mailander stated that they would have a way to enforce that.

 

  1. Establishment of Turn Lane on Franklin Avenue

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Village Council received a new map this evening.  This is on Franklin Avenue from Cottage Place to Oak Street.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that it is a concept sketch that Engineering and the Police Department have been working on to address some concerns about traffic going into Starbucks and Ben and Jerry’s with left-hand turns.  One way they could possibly make this work better is through a center left turn lane as they are used in many other parts of the country.  They can be at first a little bit scary without knowing the other driver’s intent.

Sergeant Chuck stated that the Police Department was very excited for this proposal as it was the first time that the Village has used newer traffic habits to make improvements and are managing the problem instead of saying no.  They found it difficult to manage no left turns into one parking lot, and the safety concerns were traffic getting backed up.  This would open it up so the turns would be stopping the free flow, so the turns would be in the middle and would turn during the gaps.  This would reduce the frustrations that they have seen and it will probably help with the intersections.

Mr. Rutishauser stated that if the Village Council is in favor of this, they would then have to approach Bergen County Engineering because this is a County road.  Mayor Hache asked if the narrowing of each land of traffic would have the unintended consequence of slowing things down.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that it would, and there would also be clear markings.  Visual narrowing has proven to lower the speeds of motorists.

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that when they met with the County about that corridor, this appears to be consistent with that effort.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that he believes it is consistent with some of the County’s thoughts, but he would still like them to opine upon it if the Village Council would like to move forward with this.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if this in anyway impacts the other plan.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that he thinks it can, but he would want to talk to the County Engineering staff to see their thoughts on it.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she knows that a lot of this is a result of Starbucks.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that it was Starbucks and Ben and Jerry’s.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the cones created a problem for Ben and Jerry’s.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they have met with Starbucks and they understand the severity of the Village’s concerns with the traffic there.  If this was to be adopted, exiting traffic would still only be allowed to make a right turn exiting.  Mayor Hache stated that the problem is going to be how to paint straight lines on a crooked road.

Councilman Sedon stated that he knew they had talked about adding parking on Franklin Avenue when it gets repaved.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that it would effect this area, and the other thing that could work in their favor is that they could stripe this now and give it a trial run before the road gets resurfaced in the coming years.  He added that if the County agrees with the Village Council he would like to get this done as soon as possible.

Councilman Voigt asked about the width of the center lane and if it would be consistent with the other two lanes.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they have it as 11 feet for the center turning lane and 12.5 feet for the outer lanes.  Councilman Voigt asked about the in and out for Ben and Jerry’s and also for the North Walnut Street, it looks like you can go left and right out of Ben and Jerrys and out of North Walnut Street Parking Lot.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that Ben and Jerry’s off Franklin is enter only, and for North Walnut Street Parking Lot they can look at it but right now you can exit left or right but they would have to look at it as he doesn’t think that parking lot has a lot of turnover.  Councilman Voigt stated that he assumed that TD Bank and Valley National Bank was right only.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they were right only.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if it was time to do a traffic count at this point because they have some studies from Planning Board in the past and it seems to her that traffic is getting worse and it might be a good time to do an interim count because all of those at the other end of Franklin at the corner of Broad have a look-back count that they would have to do so they should have these numbers on hand.  Sergeant Chuck stated that they could certainly do it, but he thinks this management plan is going to help.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she agreed. 

Ms. Mailander asked that the Village Council was in agreement that they would do a traffic count and then reach out to the County about getting this work done.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if Mr. Rutishauser had any idea on how long it would take for this work to get approved.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that if the Village Council would adopt a resolution at next week’s meeting because then the full weight of their voices can be seen by the County and then he would make the recommendation and get their concurrence as soon as possible.

 

  1. Operations

 

  1. Authorize Access to North Walnut Street Parking Lot – Monitoring Wells

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the owner of the Town Garage property on Franklin Avenue had hired Brinkerhoff Environmental Services who wanted to sample the Village’s monitoring wells in the North Walnut Street parking lot.  Mr. Rogers had indicated that there has to be a reason given by the company, so the Village has received an email and their indication is that ground water flows from their client’s site toward the North Walnut Street redevelopment district and access to the Village’s wells would allow them to avoid installing additional wells on the Village’s property.  They are required to delineate the extent of the plume on their client’s property per NJDEP regulations.  Mr. Rogers stated that is sufficient.

 

  1. North Walnut Street Traffic Calming

 

Ms. Mailander stated that there was a traffic study done on North Walnut Street between May 21st and 26th of this year.  Approximately 12,000 cars during that week were on North Walnut Street.  Just over 700 cars were traveling at speeds above 36 mph, 80 cars were going over 40 mph, the average speed was about 31 mph, there were less than 400 cars traveling 15 mph or less.  There was more traffic traveling south towards the CBD than north, and that’s where the speeding was taking place, for the most part.

Ms. Mailander added that a traffic study was also completed on North Walnut Street last June, and the numbers were almost identical.  They are going to propose some engineering solutions, and one of them is a permanent speed sign midway between Robinson Lane and Franklin because that is where the speeding going towards the CBD is taking place.

Mr. Rutishauser stated that they looked at a number of traffic improvement suggestions and have had a number of discussions at the Citizen Safety Advisory Committee.  Some ideas and suggestions were not looked at in favor by the residents.  One of the suggestions they did look at is a solar powered sign that will flash the speed limit of the approaching car.  They do have them in some of the school zones, and it gives a very quick feedback of your speed.  He added that Sergeant Chuck made a recommendation that they can program it to only flash up to a certain speed limit.  Sergeant Chuck stated that this recommendation encourages trial and error, because some people might try to beat their speed the next time.  Ms. Mailander added that in addition to the speed sign, they will have increased enforcement on the street, but they are confident that this will help to reduce the speeding.  There are other measures they could take which includes a double yellow line down the street.  The neighbors don’t want this, so they would like to try the speed sign and see how it works.

Councilman Voigt asked if Sergeant Chuck would have access to the data from the sign over a period of time.  Sergeant Chuck stated that he would.  Councilman Voigt asked if this would be on a pole or a telephone pole.  Sergeant Chuck stated that Signal Division would erect its own pole.  Councilman Voigt asked how obtrusive this sign would be, such as would it be flashing and bother a neighbor.  Sergeant Chuck stated that they automatically have daytime and nighttime settings, but there would definitely be a yellow light flashing when a car drives down the street.  Councilman Voigt asked if that was alright for the neighbors and he received a response from the neighbors.

Mayor Hache stated that he circulated some information to the residents and wanted to make sure that it was something that they were okay with.  Ralph Edelman, 106 North Walnut Street, stated that he thought it was a great first step and they really appreciated it.  Two weeks ago, they were talking about lowering the speed limit and he was curious what the feedback was.  He added that he had some other ideas that could maybe be built upon later, adding that there is an initiative called Vision Zero which is about reducing traffic fatalities.  If the road does get repaved, they would love to see crosswalks around Robinson, and the yellow line solution to narrow the line of vision.  A more aesthetic way of doing that would be to paint a bike lane which may be a way to calm traffic.

Councilman Voigt stated that there is a huge volume of cars on that street.  Sergeant Chuck stated that it is actually closer to 14,000 cars a day.  Councilman Voigt stated that is one of the higher volume streets that we have in the town.  Sergeant Chuck stated for a tertiary road it is high, but Oak Street is almost four times that.  Councilman Voigt stated that maybe they can find a way to lessen the volume.  Sergeant Chuck stated that it is an access point from a main road to downtown.  There are a lot of homes on that street also, so how many times are people leaving their homes every day.  He added that they did this over a holiday weekend which probably increased the number because it was such a nice weekend, but it probably wouldn’t make a huge difference in this count.  Councilman Voigt stated that it may be something they could think about in Citizens Safety Advisory Committee to reduce volume on that street.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if Sergeant Chuck had the detailed study on this and if the Village Council could obtain a copy so she could understand the hours.  Sergeant Chuck stated that he would share that.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the high speed travel is a problem all through Ridgewood.  She added that while they are looking at this and figuring out how to slow folks down, she thinks that at some point they need to look at the entire Village.  She added that they have to look at a Village-wide solution.  Sergeant Chuck stated that the Chief is in agreement, and she just bolstered the Traffic Bureau with at least one officer dedicated to enforcement all day long, which is supplemented by Patrol Officers.  He added that is directly related to the concerns they have been hearing.

Mr. Edelman stated that in terms of reducing volumes of traffic, there are three entrances to Stop and Shop, and suggested restricting the entrance on North Walnut Street to commercial only or restrict it to just enter or exit.  He added that there is a lot of traffic coming out of there.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that when she goes to Stop and Shop depending on the time of day, she can no longer make the left onto Cottage.  So she either has to go out to the right on Cottage and then make a left onto Franklin, or go out of the Franklin exit and make the left.  Sometimes Franklin is too crazy to make the left, so she oftentimes goes out onto Walnut so she can get home and not feel like she’s in a compromised position making a left.  She said there are two perspectives.  Mr. Edelman stated that a lot of the things the proposed are things that can be implemented town wide and he doesn’t think a lot of that costs a lot of money.  He added that he was curious what the pushback was to reducing the speed limit.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they had deployed the speed trailer for the count.  Sergeant Chuck stated that they like to get as natural raw data as possible, so when they are planning to place the speed counters they wipe police from the area.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they were going to deploy that in the interim as it would give some real information.  Sergeant Chuck stated that it is absolutely available, but it is at the Train Station and they put the curb around it but they would get it over there soon.

 

  1. Alternate Court Administrator

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they did a resolution designating Kimberly McWilliams as the Acting Court Administrator for the Ridgewood Municipal Court, and the rate was $35 an hour.  At the time of adoption of the resolution, Maria Doerr was not designated in a reciprocal agreement with Glen Rock.  Kim McWilliams has now been appointed as Municipal Court Administrator for the Wyckoff Municipal Court, as a result of a new shared services agreement with Glen Rock and has designated Maria Doerr as Acting Municipal Court Administrator for the Wyckoff Municipal Court.  Now that there is a reciprocal agreement in place, she has drafted a new resolution which omits compensation for the emergent services.  Ms. Mailander added that she doesn’t know that it has ever happened that our Municipal and Deputy Court Administrators were not available, but now it will work through a barter system and they will not be charged by the alternate designee.

 

  1. Ordinance to Adopt New FEMA/FIRM Maps

 

Mr. Rutishauser stated that FEMA/FIRM have finally issued new flood maps for the Village that will be effective August 28th this year.  The changes for the Village will be very minor.  The big fear they have are that the last time this occurred, a lot of the properties with a Letter of Map Amendment without the structures in the flood plains that didn’t need flood insurance were all tossed out and they have to work with the US Representatives to get them reestablished.  The ordinance before the Village Council is a total rewrite of the Village of Ridgewood flood ordinance in the code based on what the DEP has issued for communities to adopt.  The flood insurance program is significantly in arrears and the flood insurance program is looking at tightening up what people have that could be effected by a flood.

Councilwoman Walsh asked if any new properties were impacted by the new flood map that were not in the flood zone prior.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that there may be a few properties that the flood reach has now touched and are enjoined, but they haven’t identified those yet.  Councilwoman Walsh asked if they had a responsibility to notify those property owners.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they don’t, an individual only needs flood insurance under specific circumstances, if you have a mortgage a lender will require it.  He added that they do know of residents that are in flood hazard areas that do not have flood insurance because they have inherited their properties, do not have a mortgage, and have decided to take that risk upon themselves.  The properties that have been put into the flood hazard area; those lenders would be contacting the homeowners.  If they have questions, they would encourage them to come to Engineering.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she saw that there was a grievance period where they could challenge.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that the challenge requires getting a surveyor to do elevations.  FEMA/FIRM does a much higher level review and there may be individual conditions that a homeowner has that elevates them out of the flood region and if they can prove that through a survey at their own cost, a homeowner may be able to get a LOMA.

Councilwoman Knudsen asked about the Bergen County Court of Appeals being designated to hear and decide appeals and request for variances from the requirements of this ordinance.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that he formulated that section in coordination with Tom Yotka, as the Village dissolved the Village’s Board of Appeals and went to the County.  So they were having the County Board of Appeals in this ordinance be the entity of last resort for the individual that does not agree with the determination of the engineer’s office or the construction official’s office.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked for clarification on the variance piece.  Mr. Rogers stated that he didn’t think they were talking about a variance under municipal land use law, but they were talking about a deviation from the map itself and the designations.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if that was something for a construction board to handle.  Mr. Rogers stated that there wasn’t any other body in this municipality that can handle that type of appeal.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that they had to provide a venue where someone could appeal that determination and the Bergen County Court of Appeal is the most suitable venue for something for that.  Ms. Mailander added that they have to adopt it prior to the end of August.  Mr. Rutishauser stated that the state DEP would require a copy to be submitted to them to show that the Village has satisfied its requirements.

 

  1. 2020 Village Calendar Theme

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they had a couple of suggestions for the 2020 calendar theme.  One is trees which the Shade Tree Commission has proposed.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that when she learned of the Shade Tree Commission idea, she loved it and always finds that the pictures are always muddy and she thought it might be a benefit to use the free line art that is available and to take a different approach with the images.  Ms. Mailander stated that the final recommendation was hidden or not so hidden treasures of the Village.

Councilwoman Knudsen added that she wanted to elaborate on Jeanne Epiphan’s comments, adding that she isn’t good with plants but one thing Jeanne explained was native and invasive species and the impact on the birds.  There is a whole cycle that goes on, so she thought that was a good reason to incorporate her ideas with Shade Tree.  She added that from an educational perspective it was important to understand what the invasive species are doing to our environment.

Councilman Voigt stated that he had a couple of suggestions, such as places of worship, and unique homes of Ridgewood.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she liked the hidden idea because often someone will ask have you ever seen this, and there are urban legends in Ridgewood which might be fun for people to get involved in.  People can pick locations and send them in.  Councilman Sedon added that he was partial to both tree ideas, adding that there were heritage trees and merging that with some line art to bring in some focus and detail might be interesting.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that Ms. Epiphan asked if Kings Pond is a hidden treasure.  She isolated the different species that could be found at each of the different locations.  She added that the Shade Tree Commission has done an incredible job in the Village bringing attention to the importance of the tree canopy and they have learned a lot about invasive species that she thinks should be imparted to the larger community.

Mayor Hache added that he likes them all, but definitely the quality of the pictures are a problem so he would like to see if they could do something.  Ms. Mailander added that color or nicer paper increases cost.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that working with what they are working with, the front cover because of the quality of the glossier paper always makes it sharper, but when you go into the calendar you always find a muddiness.  Mayor Hache asked if they could get a mockup of what it would look like to have one versus another.  He suggested using two or three themes and seeing which one looks best.  Ms. Mailander stated that they could do this, but they would have to pay the printer.  Mayor Hache asked to just see the pictures of the concepts over one or two pages.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that she sent samples of the work from Ms. Epiphan, and line art is essentially coloring pages so there is an opportunity to make the calendar more of an experience.

 

  1. REVIEW OF JUNE 12, 2019 PUBLIC MEETING AGENDA

Ms. Jackson stated that this was a review of the June 12, 2019 Public Meeting Agenda.

Proclamations include: Bee City USA National Pollinator Week.

Resolutions for Ridgewood Water: Award Contract – Roof Repairs for Various Ridgewood Water Properties; Award Contract Under State Contract – Geographic Information System for Data Migration; and Award Contract Under Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing Contract – 2019 Ford Escape.

The following ordinances are scheduled for introduction:  3723 – Amend Chapter 190 – Land Use and Development – Certain Illuminated Signs in the Central Business District; 3724 – Amend Chapter 265 – Vehicles and Traffic – Ridgewood Parking Permits to Include Ridgewood CBD Building Owners with Offices in Their Own Building; 3725 – Amend Chapter 145 – Fees – Fees for Ridgewood Parking Permits for Central Business District Building Owners with Offices in their Own Buildings; 3726 – Amend Outdoor Café Fees – 2019 & 2020; 3727 – Amend Chapter 265 Vehicles and Traffic – Parking Restrictions on Sherman Place; 3728 – Amend Chapter 265 – Vehicles and Traffic – Parking Restrictions on Monte Vista Avenue; 3729 – Amend Chapter 154 – Flood Damage Prevention; 3730 – Reappropriate Funding in Capital Ordinance – Renovation of Tree Wells in Central Business District to Conducting a Tree Inventory; and 3731 – Establish Turn Lane on Franklin Avenue.

Ordinances for Public Hearing include: 3722 – Prohibit Use of Single Use Plastic Carry-Out Bags.

Resolutions include: Waive Fourth of July Vendor Fees; Grant Permission to Fireworks Company for Fireworks Display; Title 59 Approval – Disposal of Grass Clippings; Award Contract – Disposal of Grass Clippings; Title 59 Approval – Surface Restoration of West Façade of Village Hall; Award Contract – Surface Restoration of West Façade of Village Hall; Title 59 Approval – Underground Storage Tank System Repair; Award Contract – Underground Storage Tank System Repair; Award Contract Under State Contract – Geographic Information Systems for Various Departments; Award Contract Under State Contract  - Bulletproof Vests; Award Contract Under Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing Contract – Stump Grinder – Parks Department; Award Contract Under Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing Contract – 2019 Ford F250 Pickup Truck – Public Works; Award Contract Under Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing Contract – On-line Auction Services; Award Contract Under National Cooperative Agreement – Caterpillar Backhoe – Signal and Water Pollution Control Divisions; Award Contract Under National Cooperative Agreement – Roll-off Truck with Salter – Street Division; Award Contract Under Houston-Galveston Cooperative Purchasing Agreement – 2020 Fire Pumper; Award Contract Under Cooperative Purchasing Agreement – Rental of Interim Sewage Transfer Pumps – Andover Pump Station; Award Contract Under Cooperative Purchasing Agreement – Bucket Truck Chassis – Parks Department; Award Contract Under Cooperative Purchasing Agreement – Bucket Truck Aerial Lift – Parks Department; Award Partial Contract – Sidewalks on West Glen Avenue; Award Professional Services Contract – Certified Lake Manager – Dredging of Kings Pond; Appoint Village Attorney; Appoint Village Bond Attorney; Appoint Village Labor Attorney; Appoint Village Prosecutor and Assistant Village Prosecutor; Appoint Public Defender; Appoint Alternate Court Administrator; Appoint Community Development Representative; Appoint Representative to Open Space Trust Regional Committee; Appoint Members to Planning Board; Appoint Members to Zoning Board of Adjustment; Appoint Member to Stigma Free Task Force; Appoint Members to the Ridgewood Environmental Advisory Committee; Appoint Members to the Parks, Recreation, and Conservation Board; Appoint Members to the Green Team Advisory Committee; Allocation of Affordable Housing Trust Fund Money to The United Way for The Enclave Special Needs Housing; Extend Suspension of Ordinance for Certain Illuminated Signs in Central Business District; Authorize Tax Collector to Charge for Mailing of Tax Sale Notices; Declare Property Surplus – 2000 Packer Truck – Recycling Division; Authorize Access to North Walnut Street Parking Lot Monitoring Wells; Authorize Village of Ridgewood to be a New Jersey Future Aging Friendly Community; Endorse Bergen County Historic Preservation Grant – James Rose Center; Accept Donation – Flagpole at Public Forum Space of Memorial Park at Van Neste Square; Authorize Release of Maintenance Bond – 44 Godwin Avenue; Approve 2019-2020 Renewals of Liquor Licenses; and Appoint Village Councilmembers as Liaisons to Various Boards and Committees.

 

Mayor Hache added that this Saturday at 10:00 A.M. at Van Neste Square is the Gun Violence Awareness, wear orange, and the High School students are driving this there will be speaks and musical performances.

 

  1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

Anne Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that she wanted to echo what Ms. Mailander said about Graydon opening, they were there Sunday and it was beautiful, the snack bar is really nice and they have salads.  Councilman Sedon was there, and the pool looked great and it was nice to have it open again.  She added that last year or the current year there was a whole page of errors and corrections, holidays that were missed or duplicated, and she asked that they consider having someone that is a professional proofreader check it because more than the drawings or photos is the accuracy of the content. 

Councilwoman Knudsen added that part of the reason they brought up the theme was they made a determination that the calendar should be ready much earlier, so in speaking with Ms. Mailander they made the decision to start the process earlier on to make sure that those errors are address beforehand.

  1. RESOLUTION TO GO INTO CLOSED SESSION

 

Deputy Village Clerk Donna Jackson read Resolution #19-154 to go into Closed Session as follows:

  1. ADJOURNMENT

 

There being no further business to come before the Village Council, on a motion by Councilman Voigt, seconded by Councilwoman Knudsen, and carried unanimously by voice vote, the Village Council’s Work Session was adjourned at 10:01 P.M.

______________________________

                                                                                                  Ramon M. Hache, Sr.                                  

                                                                                                             Mayor                                     

______________________________

              Donna M. Jackson

           Deputy Village Clerk

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A REGULAR PUBLIC MEETING OF THE VILLAGE COUNCIL OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD HELD IN THE SYDNEY V. STOLDT, JR. COURT ROOM OF THE RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE HALL, 131 NORTH MAPLE AVENUE, RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY ON SEPTEMBER 11, 2019 AT 8:00 P.M.
 
1.CALL TO ORDER – OPEN PUBLIC MEETINGS ACT – ROLL CALL – FLAG     SALUTE
Mayor Hache called the meeting to order at 8:00 P.M. and read the Statement of Compliance with the Open Public Meetings Act.  At roll call the following were present: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache.  Also present were Heather Mailander, Village Manager/Village Clerk; and Matthew Rogers, Village Attorney. 
Mayor Hache led those in attendance in the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag as well as in a Moment of Silence in solemn remembrance of the victims of the terror attacks on September 11, 2001 where their memories may forever live in our hearts. 
 
2.ACCEPTANCE OF FINANCIAL REPORTS
Mayor Hache moved the Bills, Claims, and Vouchers, and Statement of Funds on Hand as of August 31, 2019, be accepted as submitted.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS: None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
 
3.ACCEPTANCE OF MINUTES
Mayor Hache moved that the Village Council minutes of August 14, 2019 having been reviewed by the Village Council and now available in the Village Clerk’s Office be approved as submitted.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS: None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None

4.PROCLAMATIONS
    A.FIRE PREVENTION WEEK
Councilwoman Knudsen read the following proclamation:
   B.GOLD STAR MOTHER’S DAY
Councilman Voigt read the following proclamation:
   C.NATIONAL BREAST CANCER AWARENESS WEEK
Councilwoman Walsh read the following proclamation:
   D.PROCLAIM SEPTEMBER NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION AWARENESS MONTH
Councilman Sedon read the following proclamation:
   E. WALKTOBERFEST
Mayor Hache read the following proclamation:
 
5.COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC
Tom Schmidt, 326 Heights Road, stated that he has some concern over the way the Village Council is handling investment or economic opportunities for the Village.  He was referring specifically to last week’s vote denying the request from Kensington Assisted Living Facility to put their proposal forth to the Planning Board.  He thought it was curious that the Village Council wouldn’t want to have a more robust discussion on what appears to be a very positive economic development for the Village in a time of need.  It struck him as a strange discussion to deny that pathway to the Planning Board.
Mr. Schmidt stated that there is no assisted living facility in this town and there are many that struggle with the burden of helping elderly parents or relatives and it would dramatically ease that burden with this facility.  Kensington’s proposal is to put the assisted living facility on South Broad Street, which is a part of town that could dramatically use this investment and would probably spur others.  The assisted living facility would add to the tax base of this town without the burden of draining the school system.  It would have the need of 200+ employees, many of which would come from the Village.  They would need to engage with vendors and other service providers, which would increase foot traffic in restaurants and local businesses.  In addition, there is no need for public parking, as there is on-site parking.  Mr. Schmidt added that he believes some of the rooms could be counted towards the Village’s needs for affordable housing.  He stated that it struck him as an opportunity that would benefit this town, yet for some reason a fuller discussion appears to be denied and he was curious as to why that happened.  He asked if the Village Council would take another look at this project.
Jeannie Johnson, 225 Mastin Place, stated that she wanted to thank the Village Manager and the Village Council for honoring Walktoberfest.  The Ridgewood Walks Committee are humbled and grateful for the recognition.  Ridgewood Walks began and remains as a labor of love, to create a more connected and a more vibrant community.  They pour their hearts into this mission because they are grateful to live in this beautiful Village that is full of wonderful, caring people.  They want to provide opportunities for these kind souls to meet one another and learn more about this lovely place we call home. It has been an overwhelming joy to see families and friends explore the Village on foot.  Ridgewood Walks could not be a success without their countless volunteer ambassadors.  These ambitious folks take tremendous pride in escorting residents around on foot on free, guided, themed walking tours.
Ms. Johnson stated that their largest tour to date was a walk through Kings Pond which was led by Ellie Gruber.  This walk had 55 people, representing every generation, who showed up on a Sunday morning to a place many had never seen before or even knew existed.  Another tour was a craft tour through the Central Business District where a group of women visited the do-it-yourself shops.  In addition, the food and bar crawls are always a huge hit, thanks to the generous owners of the Village’s bars and restaurants.  She added that they have taken tours through municipal parks, municipal buildings, and historic sites.
Ms. Johnson stated that this October, Ridgewood Walks is dedicating their tours to the 125th anniversary of the Village of Ridgewood, and will provide tours of historic neighborhoods, the downtown, and the 13 sites that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  They hope residents will join them, and experience all of the wonders of the Village, and can find out more on their website RidgewoodWalks.com.  Tour options will be posted by September 30th.  In keeping with the 125th Anniversary, and on behalf of the Historical Society and the Woman’s Club of Ridgewood, they would like to use this opportunity to invite the Village Manager, Village Council, and the community at large to celebrate with them at their historic house tour.  The event will take place on Sunday, December 8th from 10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.   Promotional materials will be mailed out next week, and will be posted throughout town, on social media, and in the Ridgewood Guild magazine.
There were no additional comments from the public.
Councilwoman Knudsen stated that regarding the Kensington presentation, last week was not the first presentation by the Kensington, because they have done several presentations dating as far back as 2014 or 2015 for a location on North Walnut Street.  The Kensington had come forward to request that the property on South Broad Street be looked at as an area in need of redevelopment.  They also asked if the Village Council would look at a PILOT program, payment in lieu of taxes, so there are a lot of moving parts to this request.  It is important to keep in mind that the Village is in the process of a new Master Plan and that the Visioning Process is a collective vision of the community at large.  September 21st and September 28th they have the Visioning Workshops and this is a process where they look at planning and the future development of the Village.  There are a lot of moving parts and it’s not as simple as approving it.  It may have appeared that last week was a flippant response, but many of the Village Councilmembers had given it a significant amount of thought.
 
6.MANAGER’S REPORT
Ms. Mailander stated that 18 years ago on this date, Ridgewood lost 12 residents in the World Trade Center attack.  They have created a poster dedicated to each individual who was lost from Ridgewood on that day, pictures of them, their family, and a short statement about them.  She invited residents to view these posters in the Ridgewood Library Auditorium, which are on display every year for the month of September for the public to remember and reflect.
Ms. Mailander stated that the upcoming Village Council meetings are September 25th for the next Public Work Session at 7:30 P.M., October 2nd Public Work Session at 7:30 P.M., and Monday, October 7th for the next Public Meeting.
Ms. Mailander stated that last Saturday, the community and elected officials joined in a groundbreaking ceremony for the Hudson Street Parking Garage and she reminded everyone that the parking lot is closed during construction of the new garage.  Hudson Street itself will continue to be open to one way traffic with limited sidewalk availability.
Ms. Mailander stated that the Bergen County Utilities Authority sponsors free recycling events throughout the year, and the next household hazardous waste collection will take place on Saturday September 14th from 9:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. at the Bergen County Campgaw Reservation, 200 Campgaw Road, in Mahwah.  Items include aerosol cans, fluorescent lightbulbs, paint and varnishes, propane, gas cylinders, and this event is rain or shine and requires proof of Bergen County residency.
Sunday, September 15th is the Fall Art, Craft, and Food Street Fair on East Ridgewood Avenue.  There are 175 vendors of arts and crafts, kids activities, great food, and all day entertainment.  The event benefits the Ridgewood Recreation Department and runs from 11:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M., rain or shine.
Ms. Mailander stated that the Mayors Wellness Festival will be held Sunday, September 22nd from 11:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. in Memorial Park at Van Neste Square.  New this year is a healthy food court and picnic area.  If you are interested in being a vendor, contact the Health Department for further details.
The Mobile Shredding Event is Saturday, September 28th, 9:00 A.M. to 12:30 P.M. in the Graydon Pool parking lot, rain or shine.  Place your items for shredding in a paper bag or cardboard box, no plastic bags will be accepted.  Ms. Mailander stated that each car is limited to five file size boxes.  This event is sponsored by Ridgewood Recycling and is free to all Village residents.
Ms. Mailander stated that the Village sold three surplus items on GovDeals, which included discarded parking meter heads for scrap metal, the ten year old senior bus, and old hot box used for paving.  The total revenue was $18,229.
Ms. Mailander stated that Gold Star Mother’s Day will be celebrated by American Legion Post #53 on Sunday, September 29th in Memorial Park at Van Neste Square at dusk.  The Village calendar indicated this even would be held on September 22nd, but this is incorrect.  This event celebrates the courageous mothers of those who protect all of us by volunteering to serve in our military.
The Bergen County Board of Elections is looking for poll workers to work the November 5th General Election from 5:30 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. in Ridgewood.  A poll worker must be 18 years old, a Bergen County resident, registered to vote, and must attend a two hour training class.  The pay is $200 for the day.  Those interested, should call the Bergen County Board of Elections.
 
7.COUNCIL REPORTS
Shade Tree Commission – Councilman Sedon stated that the Shade Tree Commission met last night and there were two paperbark maples that were relocated from the garage site on Hudson Street to the entrance to where the tunnel comes up on the west side of the train station.  That move was a success as the trees look beautiful there and the trees are a great addition to the redesigned parking lot.  Momentum and support for trees has vanished, so last year there was $50,000 appropriated to plant trees and for some reason they never got planted.  That money was re-appropriated to do a tree inventory within the Village, which will be a benefit.  There was money for trees in the paving budget, but asphalt came in too expensive and that money disappeared.  He added that he would really like to see that trees become a priority again.  Councilman Sedon stated that a good point was brought up at the meeting that the Village throws around six figure numbers for vehicles like it’s no problem, and $100,000 would go an exceedingly long way in helping to rehabilitate and replace the Village’s tree canopy.
Councilman Sedon stated that the previous Director of Parks and Recreation, Tim Cronin, was extremely helpful in the Shade Tree Commission’s efforts to plant trees and everything seemed to be in an upward trajectory.  However, since Mr. Cronin’s retirement, that momentum seems to have retired with him.  Councilman Sedon added that he would like to see trees become a priority and to get the tree inventory done.
Ms. Mailander stated that they did find approximately $45,000 in the budget to allocate towards the planting of trees.  Section B is the section that is getting trees this year, so that should go a fairly long way.  Councilman Sedon stated that was great, but the Village takes down close to 200 trees a year through sidewalk replacements and maintenance.  Although in prior years they were breaking even with the number of trees planted, the Village hasn’t caught up from the two hurricanes in previous years.  He added that this budget season will be critical for the health of our tree canopy.
Councilwoman Knudsen added that trees are a priority and that they should make this a priority because it increases the value of homes, makes our community more appealing, and actually keeps crime down.
July Fourth Committee – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the July Fourth Committee met Monday evening and are making plans for July 4, 2020.  They are working on some theme ideas, and if anyone has ideas please email them to her.
Ridgewood Arts Council – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Ridgewood Arts Council met Tuesday evening.  A decision was made to continue quarterly artist talks and to continue the holiday window display contest.  They will be working with some of the vacant locations to see which landlords will let them place holiday displays in those locations.  It is a way to make the Village look more festive.  They will also look at more options to continue window displays throughout the year in vacant locations and will perhaps coordinate this with the CBD Advisory Committee.  They are also looking into doing a collaborative art display with Stigma Free and Community Access Network and some local art therapists to do some special needs art display in Village Hall.
Planning Board Master Plan Subcommittee – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Visioning Workshops are September 21st and 28th in the Annie Zusy Community Center from 9:30 A.M. to 12:30 P.M.  She added that this is really an important part of the future of the Village of Ridgewood.  This is the core of the planning and how the community collectively sees the vision that they have for the Village 30 to 50 years from now, and the Ridgewood that we will leave to future generations.  There were over 2,400 people who participated in the survey, and over 2,100 were usable.  The more people who attend, the better.
Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that HPC meets tomorrow night with a full agenda at 8:00 P.M.
Library Board – Councilwoman Walsh stated that the Library Board was off for the month of August, so their next meeting is next Tuesday.
Chamber of Commerce – Councilwoman Walsh thanked everyone for coming to the Car Show.  There was a tiny bit of rain but it was a successful event and they are hoping next year there will be full sun and a lot more cars.
Mayor Hache thanked the Chamber of Commerce and Tom Hillman, for putting together the Car Show, as it is a tremendous amount of work.  The winner of the Mayors Trophy was a 1960 Corvette owned by a Ridgewood resident.
Citizen Safety Advisory Committee (CSAC) – Councilman Voigt stated that the CSAC will be meeting next Thursday at 7:30 P.M.
Coffee with the Council – Councilman Voigt stated that they had Coffee with the Council this past Saturday, and the entire Village Council was there.  It was very well attended by some new residents and it was nice to meet them.
Hudson Street Parking Garage Groundbreaking – Mayor Hache stated that the Hudson Street Garage groundbreaking ceremony was a very special event which could be sensed from the comments made by members of the Village Council and those who were in attendance.  The main thing that makes it even more special is how the community came together to get to this point.  He added that he is proud of the work that the Village Council has done, to get this project started.
Ridgewood Guild Music Fest – Mayor Hache stated that Music Fest was a great day in the downtown with wonderful musical acts throughout the day and there was a tremendous amount of support from local businesses, bringing the arts into the Central Business District.
Memorial Service – Mayor Hache thanked Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church for a wonderful memorial service for September 11, 2001.  He was at the World Trade Center site today and it brings it all back.  It is important for us to always remember and to help the families continue paying respects to their loved ones.
Grand Openings – Mayor Hache stated that tomorrow is the grand opening of Table at Latona’s next to Haagen Daz.  On September 21st Apricot Lane, a women’s boutique, will be having its Grand Opening.
 
8.ORDINANCES – RIDGEWOOD WATER
None.
 
9.RESOLUTIONS – RIDGEWOOD WATER
THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTIONS, NUMBERED 19-285 THROUGH 19-294, WERE ADOPTED BY A CONSENT AGENDA WITH ONE VOTE BY THE VILLAGE COUNCIL, AND WERE READ BY TITLE ONLY:
 
10.ORDINANCES
  a.INTRODUCTION - #3746 – Bond Ordinance – Zabriskie-Schedler House – Phase III
Mayor Hache moved the first reading of ordinance 3746.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS: None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
The Village Clerk read ordinance 3746 by title:
BOND ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR IMPROVEMENTS TO ZABRISKIE-SCHEDLER HOUSE PHASE III IN AND BY THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, IN THE COUNTY OF BERGEN, NEW JERSEY, APPROPRIATING $158,000 THEREFOR AND AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE OF $78,000 BONDS OR NOTES OF THE VILLAGE TO FINANCE PART OF THE COST THEREOF.
 
Councilman Sedon moved that ordinance 3746 be adopted on first reading and that September 25, 2019 be fixed as the date for the hearing thereon.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion. 
Before voting, Councilman Voigt stated that he was for renovating the building but not on the backs of residents.  If they had outside revenues and a plan for the funding, he would be in favor of it, but because of the lack of revenues and a plan, he was voting no.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:Councilman Voigt
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
  b.INTRODUCTION - #3747 – Amend Chapter 265 – Vehicles and Traffic
Mayor Hache moved the first reading of ordinance 3747.  Councilman Voigt seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS: None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
The Village Clerk read ordinance 3747 by title:
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 265 OF THE CODE OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC, AT SECTION 265-59, SCHEDULE IX: “STOP INTERSECTIONS” AND AT SECTION 265-60, SCHEDULE X: “YIELD INTERSECTIONS”
 
Councilwoman Walsh moved that ordinance 3747 be adopted on first reading and that October 7, 2019 be fixed as the date for the hearing thereon.  Councilman Voigt seconded the motion. 
Roll Call Vote
AYES: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS: None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
  c.INTRODUCTION - #3748 – Amend Chapter 190 – Land Use and Development - Driveways
Mayor Hache moved the first reading of ordinance 3748.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
The Village Clerk read ordinance 3748 by title:
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 190 OF THE CODE OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD AT SECTION 190-121G TO REQUIRE DRIVEWAYS ON LOTS WHERE A GARAGE EXISTS AND REQUIRE THAT THE DRIVEWAY EXTENDS TO CONNECT COMPLETELY TO THE GARAGE
 
Councilman Voigt moved that ordinance 3748 be adopted on first reading and that October 7, 2019 be fixed as the date for the hearing thereon.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion. 
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS: None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
  d.INTRODUCTION - #3749 – Establish Reserved Parking Spaces at Train Station Parking Lot – NJ Transit and Concession Stand/Social Service Association
Mayor Hache moved the first reading of ordinance 3749.  Councilman Voigt seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN:None
The Village Clerk read ordinance 3749 by title:
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 265 OF THE CODE OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC, AT SECTION 265-42, “RESERVED PARKING SPACES”
 
Councilman Sedon moved that ordinance 3749 be adopted on first reading and that October 7, 2019 be fixed as the date for the hearing thereon.  Councilman Voigt seconded the motion. 
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
  e.PUBLIC HEARING - #3735 – Amend Chapter 265 – Vehicles and Traffic – Time Limit Parking on Monte Vista, Park Slope, Madison Place and North Hillside Place
Mayor Hache moved the reading of ordinance 3735 by title on second reading and that the Public Hearing thereon be opened.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
The Village Clerk read ordinance 3735 by title:
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 265 OF THE CODE OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC, AT SECTION 265-69, “TIME LIMIT PARKING”
Mayor Hache stated that the Public Hearing was opened.  There were no comments from the public, and Mayor Hache moved that the Public Hearing be closed.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.  
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN:None
Councilman Sedon moved that ordinance 3735 be adopted on second reading and final publication as required by law.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN:None
  f.PUBLIC HEARING - #3736 – Amend Chapter 145 – Fees – Fire Prevention Fees
Mayor Hache moved the reading of ordinance 3736 by title on second reading and that the Public Hearing thereon be opened.  Councilman Voigt seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
The Village Clerk read ordinance 3736 by title:
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 145 OF THE CODE OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, FEES, AT SECTION 145-6, “FEES RELATED TO CODE CHAPTERS”
Mayor Hache stated that the Public Hearing was opened.  There were no comments from the public, and Mayor Hache moved that the Public Hearing be closed.  Councilman Voigt seconded the motion.  
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
Councilwoman Walsh moved that ordinance 3736 be adopted on second reading and final publication as required by law.  Councilman Voigt seconded the motion.
  g.PUBLIC HEARING - #3737 – Amend Various Salary Ordinances
Mayor Hache moved the reading of ordinance 3737 by title on second reading and that the Public Hearing thereon be opened.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
The Village Clerk read ordinance 3737 by title:
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND SALARY ORDINANCE 3608 FIXING THE SALARIES, WAGES AND OTHER COMPENSATION FOR WHITE COLLAR EMPLOYEES; AND TO AMEND SALARY ORDINANCE 3607 FIXING SALARIES, WAGES AND OTHER COMPENSATION OF AND FOR THE BLUE COLLAR EMPLOYEES; AND TO AMEND SALARY ORDINANCE 3618 FIXING SALARIES, WAGES AND OTHER COMPENSATION OF AND FOR THE SUPERVISORY EMPLOYEES; AND TO AMEND SALARY ORDINANCE 3679, FIXING SALARIES, WAGES AND OTHER COMPENSATION AND TO ESTABLISH THE “EMPLOYEE AGREEMENT” OF CERTAIN NON-UNION OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES; AND TO AMEND SALARY ORDINANCE 3680, FIXING SALARIES, WAGES, AND OTHER COMPENSATION AND TO ESTABLISH THE “EMPLOYEE AGREEMENT” OF CERTAIN NON-UNION EMPLOYEES OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, COUNTY OF BERGEN AND STATE OF NEW JERSEY
Mayor Hache stated that the Public Hearing was opened.  There were no comments from the public, and Mayor Hache moved that the Public Hearing be closed.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.  
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN:None
Councilman Voigt moved that ordinance 3737 be adopted on second reading and final publication as required by law.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
  h.PUBLIC HEARING - #3738 – Amend Chapter 212 – Tennis Courts – Rules and Regulations
Mayor Hache moved the reading of ordinance 3738 by title on second reading and that the Public Hearing thereon be opened.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
The Village Clerk read ordinance 3738 by title:
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 212 OF THE CODE OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, SECTION 212, PARKS AND RECREATION AREAS, ARTICLE VII, RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECTION 212-27 TENNIS COURTS
Mayor Hache stated that the Public Hearing was opened.  There were no comments from the public, and Mayor Hache moved that the Public Hearing be closed.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.  
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN:None
Councilman Voigt moved that ordinance 3738 be adopted on second reading and final publication as required by law.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN:None
  i.PUBLIC HEARING - #3739 – Amend Chapter 18 – Environmental Advisory Committee – Name Change and Establish Membership
Mayor Hache moved the reading of ordinance 3739 by title on second reading and that the Public Hearing thereon be opened.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
The Village Clerk read ordinance 3739 by title:
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 18 OF THE CODE OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, ENVIRONMENTAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE, AT SECTION 18-1 ESTABLISHMENT, SECTION 18-4 COMPOSITION AND SECTION 18-5 EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES, MEMBERSHIP IN STATE ASSOCIATION
Mayor Hache stated that the Public Hearing was opened.  There were no comments from the public, and Mayor Hache moved that the Public Hearing be closed.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.  
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
Councilwoman Walsh moved that ordinance 3739 be adopted on second reading and final publication as required by law.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
  j.PUBLIC HEARING - #3740 – Amend Chapter 26 – Green Team
Mayor Hache moved the reading of ordinance 3740 by title on second reading and that the Public Hearing thereon be opened.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
The Village Clerk read ordinance 3740 by title:
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 18 OF THE CODE OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, GREEN TEAM, AT SECTION 26-1 ESTABLISHMENT, SECTION 26-2 PURPOSE AND SECTION 26-3 MEMBERSHIP
Mayor Hache stated that the Public Hearing was opened.  There were no comments from the public, and Mayor Hache moved that the Public Hearing be closed.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.  
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
Councilwoman Walsh moved that ordinance 3740 be adopted on second reading and final publication as required by law.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN:None
  k.PUBLIC HEARING - #3741 – Amend Chapter 190 – Signs – Regulations for Window Displays in the Business District
Mayor Hache moved the reading of ordinance 3741 by title on second reading and that the Public Hearing thereon be opened.  Councilman Voigt seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
The Village Clerk read ordinance 3741 by title:
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 190 OF THE CODE OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD AT SECTION 122 (E) ENTITLED “SIGNS IN THE B-1, B-2 AND C” DISTRICTS, TO CREATE A NEW SUBSECTION 190-122 E
(7) ENTITLED “WINDOW SIGNS”, AND NEW SUBSECTION 190-122 E (8) ENTITLED “WINDOW DISPLAYS”, AND AMEND SECTION 190-3 ENTITLED “DEFINITIONS” AS IT PERTAINS TO “SIGN”, AND CREATE NEW DEFINITIONS IN SECTION 190-3 FOR “WINDOW AREA”, “WINDOW SIGN”, AND “WINDOW DISPLAY”
Mayor Hache stated that the Planning Board has recommended that there be some amendments made to this ordinance.  The first amendment is the title, which should read as follows: AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 190 OF THE CODE OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD AT SECTION 190-3 ENTITLED “DEFINITIONS” TO CREATE NEW DEFINITIONS FOR “WINDOW AREA”, “WINDOW SIGN” AND “WINDOW DISPLAY” AND TO AMEND THE DEFINITION OF “SIGN”, AND TO AMEND CHAPTER 190 OF THE CODE OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD AT SECTION 122 E. ENTITLED “SIGNS IN THE B-1, B-2, AND C DISTRICTS” TO CREATE A NEW SUBSECTION 190-122 E. (7) ENTITLED “WINDOW DISPLAYS”, AND TO AMEND SUBSECTION 190-122 E. (2) (d). In addition, on Page 2, Section 190-3, the wording of “Signs – Any device” shall be changed to “Sign – Any device”. Finally, brackets shall be added to numbers 1-5 in the new Section 190-122 E. (2) (d).  The Village Attorney has indicated that these are not substantive changes, so the Public Hearing on Ordinance #3741, with the amendments, will be held this evening.
Councilman Sedon moved that Ordinance 3741 be amended as delineated by Mayor Hache.  Councilman Voigt seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
Mayor Hache stated that the Public Hearing was open on Ordinance 3741, as amended.  There were no comments from the public, and Mayor Hache moved that the Public Hearing be closed.  Councilman Voigt seconded the motion.  
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
Councilman Sedon moved that ordinance 3741, as amended, be adopted on second reading and final publication as required by law.  Councilman Voigt seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
  l.PUBLIC HEARING - #3742 – Amend Chapter 154 – Flood Damage Prevention
Mayor Hache moved the reading of ordinance 3742 by title on second reading and that the Public Hearing thereon be opened.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
The Village Clerk read ordinance 3742 by title:
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 154 OF THE CODE OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, FLOOD DAMAGE PREVENTION
Mayor Hache stated that the Public Hearing was opened.  There were no comments from the public, and Mayor Hache moved that the Public Hearing be closed.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.  
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
Councilman Voigt moved that ordinance 3742 be adopted on second reading and final publication as required by law.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
  m.PUBLIC HEARING - #3745 – Establish Loading Zone at Train Station Parking Lot
Mayor Hache moved the reading of ordinance 3745 by title on second reading and that the Public Hearing thereon be opened.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
The Village Clerk read ordinance 3745 by title:
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 265 OF THE CODE OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC, AT SECTION 265-72, SCHEDULE XXII “LOADING ZONES”
Mayor Hache stated that the Public Hearing was opened.  There were no comments from the public, and Mayor Hache moved that the Public Hearing be closed.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.  
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS: None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
Councilman Voigt moved that ordinance 3745 be adopted on second reading and final publication as required by law.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
  n. CONTINUED PUBLIC HEARING - #3730 – Amend Chapter 190 – Land Use and Development – Swimming Pools
Mayor Hache moved the reading of ordinance 3730 by title on third reading and that the Public Hearing thereon be opened.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
The Village Clerk read ordinance 3730 by title:
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 190 OF THE CODE OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, LAND USE AND DEVELOPMENT, TO REMOVE REFERENCES TO CHAPTER 251, SWIMMING POOLS
Mayor Hache stated that the hearing on ordinance 3730 was continued to this evening’s meeting because the newspaper made an error in the legal ad and did not publish the ordinance in full, as required by law.  The ordinance has now been published in full, along with the continued Public Hearing date.  Mayor Hache stated that the Public Hearing on Ordinance 3730 is now continued.  Councilwoman Knudsen seconded the motion.  
Boyd Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that he didn’t know what the ordinance was all about other than it has something to do with fences and swimming pools, but he wanted to express to the Village Council that this might provide a loophole.  As he understands it, currently the local ordinance permits the owners who have swimming pools to have fences as high as six feet around their property.  What he has noticed in several swimming pool installations in the Village is that there are some people who choose to have a fence around the pool itself and then have a six foot fence around the property.  Mr. Loving stated that he didn’t think that should be permitted.  If there is a fence around the pool itself, there shouldn’t be another fence permitted around the entire property.  He added that he wasn’t sure if this ordinance would further facilitate that or would make it more difficult to do that, but he wanted to express his concern that the removal of this from the local ordinance, which would then be covered by the State regulations only, he wasn’t sure what was going to happen.
Councilwoman Knudsen stated that over a year ago, the Village Council changed that ordinance so that a six foot fence was no longer permitted in the front yard.  Ordinance 3730 removes the reference the Chapter 251 because this chapter does not pertain to swimming pools.  She added that this was a housekeeping item, and they were going to revisit the fence ordinance in the future to clean it up a bit more.
Mr. Rogers agreed that ordinance 3730 removes any reference to swimming pools in Chapter 251, and the effort here is not to do anything other than to make the code more cohesive.  It has to do with the enforcement of what the intent is of the ordinance.  It won’t give anybody an opportunity to put a smaller fence around the pool and a larger fence around the property.
Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they would add the issue that Mr. Loving raised to the Planning Board agenda, and have the Planner look at what the Village has done in the past, so that the new fence ordinance is clear and it prevents a six foot fence around the property.  There were no additional comments from the public and Mayor Hache moved that the Public Hearing be closed.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS: None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
Councilman Voigt moved that ordinance 3730 be adopted on third reading and final publication as required by law.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
   o.CONTINUED PUBLIC HEARING - #3734 – Establish Reserved Parking Spaces at Train Station Parking Lot – NJ Transit and Concession Stand/Social Service Association
Mayor Hache moved the reading of ordinance 3734 by title on third reading and that the Public Hearing thereon be opened.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
The Village Clerk read ordinance 3734 by title:
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 265 OF THE CODE OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC, AT SECTION 265-42, “RESERVED PARKING SPACES”
Mayor Hache stated that the hearing on ordinance 3734 was continued to this evening’s meeting so that the actual hours of the NJ Transit ticket booth employee and the hours of the concession stand/Social Services Association employees could be determined.  The actual hours for these individuals are different than those stated in ordinance 3734, and the Village Attorney has indicated that this is a substantive change.  Therefore, ordinance 3734 will be defeated this evening.  Ordinance 3749, introduced this evening is the same ordinance, with the corrected hours for the individuals using the reserved parking spaces.  Even though ordinance 3734 will be defeated, the Public Hearing on this ordinance was advertised for this evening, so anyone wishing to comment on this ordinance may do so at this time.  Mayor Hache stated that the Public Hearing on Ordinance 3734 was continued.  There were no comments from the public, and Mayor Hache moved that the Public Hearing be closed.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.  
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS:None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
Councilwoman Walsh moved that ordinance 3734 be defeated.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.  Ms. Mailander stated that an “Aye” vote is to defeat the ordinance.
Roll Call Vote
AYES:Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache
NAYS: None
ABSENT: None
ABSTAIN: None
Councilwoman Knudsen asked if it was ever determined if the insurance for the vehicle that caused the damage to the taxi stand would cover the damage.  Ms. Mailander stated that the Village would be getting $5,000, which will cover only the architect’s fees.
 
11.RESOLUTIONS
THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTIONS, NUMBERED 19-295 THROUGH 19-317, WERE ADOPTED BY A CONSENT AGENDA WITH ONE VOTE BY THE VILLAGE COUNCIL, AND WERE READ BY TITLE ONLY:
THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTIONS, NUMBERED 19-318 THROUGH 19-319, WERE CONSIDERED SEPARATELY AND READ IN FULL:
Before casting his vote on Resolution 19-318, Councilman Voigt stated the he was in favor of the restoration of the building, but not on the backs of our residents.  There is also no plan for how the Village was going to use the building so he was voting no.
Regarding Resolution 19-319, Councilwoman Walsh stated that she thinks that the public needs more information on this proposed project.  She felt like she didn’t have all of the information, and in the pre-meeting this evening, the Village Manager said that she was going to get Councilwoman Walsh information that she doesn’t recall getting on this proposed project.  She was concerned that the Mayor and Council in Glen Rock have not been informed of the Village’s plans for the Police shooting range, as the property is located in Glen Rock.  Councilwoman Walsh also doesn’t have any cost estimates and she knows there is a number floating around of $5 million.  She added that she thought that the only partner in this was Glen Rock and she was left to believe this evening that there were multiple municipalities who may partner with the Village.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she felt like there wasn’t enough information that has been provided for her to be able to vote this forward.  There also is a portion of this that she has to recuse herself from because it entails something that is part of negotiations with the Village for other things.
Ms. Mailander stated that this $10,000 is to get a preliminary plan that would allow the Village to have a draft layout of the Police shooting range and a true cost estimate.  Councilwoman Walsh asked if the cost estimate was to build it.  Ms. Mailander stated that it was to build.  Councilman Voigt asked if it would then be presented to the public.  Ms. Mailander stated once the architect is finished with the draft plans, it will be discussed at a Work Session.  At that time they can approach Glen Rock with a cost for the Police shooting range, and see if they are interested in partnering with the Village.  They can then move forward from there, depending on Glen Rock’s decision.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she felt strongly that the residents of Glen Rock should be part of the discussion because the facility is a Ridgewood owned property, but it is located in Glen Rock.  She added that they all watched what happened in Ramsey with a proposed shooting range.  She believes there will be an outpouring of concern on this Police shooting range as well, and she felt it was important that the information be put out there.
Councilwoman Knudsen added that she felt it was important that they all are mindful to what erupted in Ramsey is very different from what they are discussing here tonight.  It is a comparison that cannot reasonably be made, as the proposal in Ramsey was for a private shooting range and a bar, while Ridgewood’s Police shooting range is a training facility for our law enforcement professionals.  They are trying to find locations and the officers really do need to train.  This was previously approved and this is just the award of contract, which was discussed previously and at length and there are emails from the Village Manager regarding some of the details.
Mayor Hache added that he agreed that they need to have a much more open discussion with the public and involve the citizens of Glen Rock, but the Village cannot move forward without having something to present to Glen Rock.  In order for this to make even more sense in the perspective of offsetting the cost, they want to have participation from other municipalities that can come in as partners and help lighten the financial burden.
Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she was under the impression that there may be grant money and other funding that would be available for this project as well, so this is an important step that they have to take. Councilman Voigt stated that he was in agreement that they needed to provide information to Glen Rock, but the only way they could do that was to approve this project for a draft layout and cost estimate and then the Village can provide the information to Glen Rock and other municipalities.  Therefore, he was okay with moving forward.  Councilman Sedon stated that he was also in agreement as having a design and a cost will help to facilitate the conversation.  He also said that there have been a lot of plans made up for things in the Village, so this is just part of the process, before it is brought for discussion to the public.
 
12.COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC
Ellie Gruber, 229 South Irving Street, thanked Councilman Sedon for speaking about the trees.  She added that she was sending an email to the Village Council that the downtown looks disgraceful, as half of the trees are dead and the other half are not planted correctly.  The Village spends money on trees in the CBD, and the store owners don’t take care of them, which is disgraceful.  She feels that somehow, the Village Council has to give some importance to trees.  She added that she was going to suggest that the store owners, who are responsible for sidewalks and other things, should have their feet put to the fire and pay a little for tree maintenance.  Ms. Gruber stated that if they added up every tree that has been planted and has not survived; it would be in the thousands of dollars.
Ms. Gruber stated that she thinks that the municipal budget is a bargain for what residents receive, and the public has to understand that the municipal budget is a small part of what is paid in taxes.  The Open Space tax was overwhelmingly voted yes because people want greenery and trees.  We need trees and the Parks Department has the park trees and the street trees, but the CBD is disgraceful and the storeowners should be accountable to do some of the maintenance.  She suggested that the Shade Tree Chair should find the correct way to plant the trees, because other towns have street trees which survive, so they have found a way.  Ms. Gruber suggested that the Village Council should walk downtown and really look at the trees, as it’s disgraceful.
Boyd Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that he appreciated the comments made by Councilwoman Knudsen to have the Planning Board take another look at the fence situation as it seems ridiculous to him that someone has a swimming pool that takes up an eighth of their yard but the entire backyard is surrounded by a six foot high stockade fence.  This ruins the landscape, particularly if the pool already has a six foot high fence.  He suggested the Planning Board come up with some sort of alternative, so that they can prevent this outpouring of six foot high fences, which can’t be seen through, which then ruins the landscape.
Mr. Loving stated that he was concerned about the accident that happened at the taxi stand at the Train Station, where a car ran into it.  He asked if the Village Manager could clarify what was said regarding insurance, as it seems odd to him that the insurance of the person driving the car isn’t going to cover the amount, which means it now becomes an expense that the taxpayers have to bear.  He added that he would imagine that if it’s $5,000 for the architectural fee for the taxi stand repair, then the cost to repair the taxi stand is going to be in the tens of thousands of dollars.  He asked for clarification.
Ms. Mailander stated that the $5,000 the Village is getting from the insurance company, is from the driver’s insurance.  After that, the actual repair to the taxi stand is going to be additional money that the Village will probably not get reimbursed for through insurance.  The reason for this is that the driver is in his mid-eighties and does not have additional money, according to the JIF claims representative.
Mayor Hache thanked Ms. Gruber for bringing up the importance of trees and for Councilman Sedon bringing up what the Village needs to do, but he thinks there are two other projects when talking about the trees in the CBD.  They have had plenty of presentation from Shade Tree talking about how the design of the tree wells is not conducive for the health and vitality of the trees, so for them to urge anyone to plant trees it’s not going to give the trees a chance to thrive and survive.   A project needs to happen to remove the brick bands and the faulty design for the tree wells.  He added that Ridgewood isn’t the only location with trees, and trees in other municipalities are thriving, but that is a bigger project for the Village.  Mayor Hache stated that the bigger discussion is the brick bands and what they are going to do to remediate the tree wells.
There were no additional comments from the public, and Mayor Hache closed public comment.
 
13.ADJOURNMENT
There being no further business to come before the Village Council, on a motion by Councilman Sedon, seconded by Councilwoman Walsh, and carried unanimously by voice vote, the Village Council’s Regular Public Meeting was adjourned at 9:20 P.M.
 
 

______________________________
      Ramon M. Hache, Sr.                        
              Mayor    
 
______________________________
         Heather A. Mailander
      Village Manager/Village Clerk
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