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A SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETING OF THE VILLAGE COUNCIL OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD HELD IN THE SYDNEY V. STOLDT, JR. COURT ROOM OF THE RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE HALL, 131 NORTH MAPLE AVENUE, RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY ON SEPTEMBER 25, 2019 AT 7:30 P.M.

 

  1. CALL TO ORDER – OPEN PUBLIC MEETINGS ACT – ROLL CALL

 

Mayor Hache called the meeting to order at 7:59 P.M. and read the Statement of Compliance with the Open Public Meetings Act.  At roll call the following were present: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, and Mayor Hache.  Also present were Heather Mailander, Village Manager/Village Clerk; Matthew Rogers, Village Attorney; and Donna Jackson, Deputy Village Clerk.  Councilwoman Walsh was absent.

 

  1. ORDINANCES

 

 

  1. INTRODUCTION – #3750 – Amend Chapter 265 – Vehicles and Traffic – 15 Minute Parking Meter on East Ridgewood Avenue

 

Mayor Hache moved the first reading of ordinance 3750.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        Councilwoman Walsh

ABSTAIN:      None

 

The Village Clerk read ordinance 3750 by title:

 

AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 265 OF THE CODE OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC, AT SECTION 265-29, “PARKING METER ZONE DESIGNATED”

 

Councilwoman Knudsen moved that ordinance 3750 be adopted on first reading and that October 7, 2019 be fixed as the date for the hearing thereon.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion. 

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        Councilwoman Walsh

ABSTAIN:      None

 

  1. PUBLIC HEARING - #3746 – Bond Ordinance – Zabriskie-Schedler House – Phase III

 

Mayor Hache moved the reading of ordinance 3746 by title on second reading and that the Public Hearing thereon be opened.  Councilwoman Knudsen seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        Councilwoman Walsh

ABSTAIN:      None

 

The Village Clerk read ordinance 3746 by title:

 

BOND ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR IMPROVEMENTS TO ZABRISKIE-SCHEDLER HOUSE PHASE III IN AND BY THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, IN THE COUNTY OF BERGEN, NEW JERSEY, APPROPRIATING $158,000 THEREFOR AND AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE OF $78,000 BONDS OR NOTES OF THE VILLAGE TO FINANCE PART OF THE COST THEREOF

 

Mayor Hache stated that the entire Village Council should vote on this bond ordinance, and since Councilwoman Walsh is not present this evening, they will be continuing the Public Hearing and final vote to their October Public Meeting.  The Public Hearing on Ordinance 3746 was advertised for this evening, so anyone wishing to comment may do so at this time.  He stated that the Public Hearing was now open. 

 

There were no comments from the public, and Mayor Hache moved that the Public Hearing on ordinance 3746 be continued to October 7, 2019.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.  

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        Councilwoman Walsh

ABSTAIN:      None

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. RESOLUTIONS

 

THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTIONS, NUMBERED 19-320 THROUGH 19-326, WERE ADOPTED BY A CONSENT AGENDA WITH ONE VOTE BY THE VILLAGE COUNCIL, AND WERE READ BY TITLE ONLY:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. ADJOURNMENT

 

There being no further business to come before the Village Council, Councilwoman Knudsen made a motion to adjourn, seconded by Councilman Sedon, and carried unanimously by voice vote, the Village Council’s Special Public Meeting was adjourned at 8:05 P.M.

 

 

 

 

______________________________

                                                                                  Ramon M. Hache, Sr.                                                  

Mayor                        

 

 

______________________________

          Donna M. Jackson

        Deputy Village Clerk

  • Hits: 20

A SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETING OF THE VILLAGE COUNCIL OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD HELD IN THE SYDNEY V. STOLDT, JR. COURT ROOM OF THE RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE HALL, 131 NORTH MAPLE AVENUE, RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY ON SEPTEMBER 4, 2019 AT 7:30 P.M.

 

  1. CALL TO ORDER – OPEN PUBLIC MEETINGS ACT – ROLL CALL

 

Mayor Hache called the meeting to order at 8:00 P.M. and read the Statement of Compliance with the Open Public Meetings Act.  At roll call the following were present: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache.  Also present were Heather Mailander, Village Manager/Village Clerk; Matthew Rogers, Village Attorney; and Donna Jackson, Deputy Village Clerk. 

 

  1. ORDINANCES

 

  1. PUBLIC HEARING - #3729 – Bond Ordinance – Acquisition of Vehicles for Parking Utility

 

Mayor Hache moved the reading of ordinance 3729 by title on second reading and that the Public Hearing thereon be opened.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        None

ABSTAIN:      None

 

The Village Clerk read ordinance 3729 by title:

 

BOND ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR THE ACQUISITION OF SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES WITH ACCESSORIES FOR THE PARKING UTILITY IN AND BY THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, IN THE COUNTY OF BERGEN, NEW JERSEY, APPROPRIATING $57,000 THEREFOR AND AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE OF $57,000 BONDS OR NOTES OF THE VILLAGE TO FINANCE THE COST THEREOF

 

Mayor Hache stated that the Public Hearing was opened. 

 

Russell Forenza, 228 Emmett Place, stated that they used to purchase vehicles for employees, instead of buying brand new vehicles for different authorities in town, they would get hand me down vehicles.  He finds it unnecessary to spend money on brand new vehicles for the Parking Authority that doesn’t know how to account for $700,000 of money that is always missing, or seems to be missing. 

 

There were no additional comments from the public, and Mayor Hache moved that the Public Hearing was closed.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.  

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        None

ABSTAIN:      None

 

Councilwoman Knudsen moved that ordinance 3729 be adopted on second reading and final publication as required by law.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        None

ABSTAIN:      None

 

  1. PUBLIC HEARING - #3732 – Bond Ordinance – Acquisition of Vehicles – Parks Department and Traffic & Signal Department

 

Mayor Hache moved the reading of ordinance 3732 by title on second reading and that the Public Hearing thereon be opened.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        None

ABSTAIN:      None

 

The Village Clerk read ordinance 3732 by title:

 

BOND ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR THE ACQUISITION OF VEHICLES IN AND BY THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, IN THE COUNTY OF BERGEN, NEW JERSEY, APPROPRIATING $79,000 THEREFOR AND AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE OF $75,000 BONDS OR NOTES OF THE VILLAGE TO FINANCE PART OF THE COST THEREOF

 

Mayor Hache stated that the Public Hearing was opened.  There were no comments from the public, and Mayor Hache moved that the Public Hearing was closed.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.  

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        None

ABSTAIN:      None

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked for an updated inventory of all of the Village vehicles, she added that to Mr. Forenza’s point they do use as many vehicles as they can and do the hand me downs, but having an updated list of the inventory would be helpful.

 

Councilman Sedon moved that ordinance 3732 be adopted on second reading and final publication as required by law.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        None

ABSTAIN:      None

 

  1. PUBLIC HEARING - #3733 – Bond Ordinance – Reappropriate Funds for Scarab Windrow Turner

 

Mayor Hache moved the reading of ordinance 3733 by title on second reading and that the Public Hearing thereon be opened.  Councilwoman Knudsen seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        None

ABSTAIN:      None

 

The Village Clerk read ordinance 3733 by title:

 

BOND ORDINANCE REAPPROPRIATING $611,081.95, INCLUDING $593,892.95 OF PROCEEDS OF OBLIGATIONS NOT NEEDED FOR THEIR ORIGINAL PURPOSES AND $17,189 FROM THE CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT FUND, IN ORDER TO PROVIDE FOR THE ACQUISITION OF A SCARAB WINDROW TURNER IN AND BY THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, IN THE COUNTY OF BERGEN, NEW JERSEY

 

Mayor Hache stated that the Public Hearing was opened. 

 

Russell Forenza, 228 Emmett Place, stated that he sees they are trying to appropriate money and awhile he suggested that they also have a shredder in town and to locate it at the Recycling Center.  He was wondering if that was given any thought since they appropriated such a large amount of money here.  He asked specifically what type of equipment they were buying with this ordinance as he wasn’t familiar with it.

 

Councilman Sedon stated that it was a big machine that they use at the composting facility that helps to turn the leaves and make the compost.  This will help the Village to better create more compost which it sells, and then they don’t have to pay to get rid of the leaves.  Mr. Forenza stated that they used to dump the leaves behind Orchard School at one point, and he was wondering if there were any other spots in town to dump leaves.  He added that was a lot of money and that he hoped they were going to get their money back on that.  He added that he hopes they are still also considering the shredder.

 

There were no additional comments from the public, and Mayor Hache moved that the Public Hearing was closed.  Councilman Voigt seconded the motion.  

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        None

ABSTAIN:      None

 

Councilman Sedon moved that ordinance 3733 be adopted on second reading and final publication as required by law.  Councilman Voigt seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        None

ABSTAIN:      None

 

  1. PUBLIC HEARING - #3734 – Establish Reserved Parking Spaces at Train Station Parking Lot – NJ Transit and Concession Stand/Social Service Association

 

Mayor Hache moved the reading of ordinance 3734 by title on second reading and that the Public Hearing thereon be opened.  Councilwoman Knudsen seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        None

ABSTAIN:      None

 

The Village Clerk read ordinance 3734 by title:

 

AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 265 OF THE CODE OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC, AT SECTION 265-42, “RESERVED PARKING SPACES”

 

Mayor Hache stated that the Public Hearing was opened. 

 

Boyd Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that he was at the Work Session when this was discussed and he was unclear as to what this was all about.  His recollection is that the NJ Transit Ticket Agent received a summons and as a result they are now putting in a reserved parking space which boggles his mind.  For years there has been an agent at that station who puts a placard in their window stating that they are an agent of NJ Transit and are left alone.  Why all of a sudden as a result of one summons are the taxpayers being forced to spend money to create a reserved parking space.  Mr. Loving asked for further explanation as to why there is a need for a reserved parking space now when they have expanded the lot, made more spaces available, and this person arrives at 5:00 A.M. in the morning so why are they taking out a machine gun to solve a problem that could be dealt with a fly swatter.

 

Mayor Hache stated that contractually, the Village is required to provide a space for NJ Transit.  He added that it makes enforcement easier if there is one designated spot for this person to be able to park.  Mr. Loving stated that he is opposed to the creation of a parking spot when he doesn’t think one is necessary.  For years the parking arrives and puts a placard in their vehicle and isn’t bothered, but as a result of one summons all of a sudden they are standing on their heads.

 

Mr. Loving added that the way that he is reading the ordinance, the time on the ordinance is 6:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. Monday through Saturday.  He sees that the ticket agent hours are 5:00 A.M. to 12:30 P.M. Monday through Friday.  The time that the Village has marked on the ordinance for when the space is going to be in effect doesn’t coincide with the time that the ticket agent is working.  He encouraged the Village Council to change the ordinance so that it coincides with the hours of the ticket agent.

 

Mayor Hache stated that he agreed, that if the hours didn’t coincide with the hours of operation then they should carry the ordinance.  Ms. Mailander stated that they could continue the ordinance to September 11th and then find out that information between now and then.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen made a motion to continue the Public Hearing on ordinance 3734 to September 11th.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        None

ABSTAIN:      None

 

  1. PUBLIC HEARING - #3744 – Designate Parking Spaces in Train Station Lot for Hudson Street Lot Permit Holders

 

Mayor Hache moved the reading of ordinance 3744 by title on second reading and that the Public Hearing thereon be opened.  Councilman Voigt seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        None

ABSTAIN:      None

 

The Village Clerk read ordinance 3744 by title:

 

AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 265 OF THE CODE OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC, AT SECTION 265-29, “PARKING METER ZONE DESIGNATED”

 

Mayor Hache stated that the Public Hearing was opened. 

 

Russell Forenza, 228 Emmett Place, stated that he was against saving all types of parking spaces.  Here they were taking people from the Hudson Street Lot at putting them at the Train Station.  He asked how many people they were talking about for permits, and asked how many extra spots there were at the Train Station lot.  He asked how this permit situation works.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that this is a temporary solution because there were residents who purchased passes to park at the Hudson Street Lot which is now closed for the next nine months, and they needed to put those parkers somewhere.  Because of the recent expansion at the Train Station, it was an opportunity to not inconvenience anyone who had paid for those passes.  They are accommodating folks who paid for a pass.  Mr. Forenza asked how many spaces were necessary.  Mayor Hache stated that there were 12 spaces from Hudson Street that moved over to the Train Station, and they added 35 spaces with the recent expansion.  Mr. Forenza mentioned all of the trees that were cut down.  Councilman Sedon stated that he believes the plan is to replace all of the 14 to 15 trees that were cut down.

 

There were no additional comments from the public, and Mayor Hache moved that the Public Hearing was closed.  Councilman Voigt seconded the motion.  

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        None

ABSTAIN:      None

 

Councilwoman Knudsen moved that ordinance 3744 be adopted on second reading and final publication as required by law.  Councilman Voigt seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        None

ABSTAIN:      None

 

  1. RESOLUTIONS

 

THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTIONS, NUMBERED 19-280 THROUGH 19-283, WERE ADOPTED BY A CONSENT AGENDA WITH ONE VOTE BY THE VILLAGE COUNCIL, AND WERE READ BY TITLE ONLY:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. ADJOURNMENT

 

There being no further business to come before the Village Council, Mayor Hache made a motion to adjourn, seconded by Councilwoman Walsh, and carried unanimously by voice vote, the Village Council’s Special Public Meeting was adjourned at 8:20 P.M.

 

 

 

 

______________________________

                                                                                 Ramon M. Hache, Sr.                                                  

Mayor                        

 

 

______________________________

          Donna M. Jackson

        Deputy Village Clerk

  • Hits: 47

A SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETING OF THE VILLAGE COUNCIL OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD HELD IN THE SYDNEY V. STOLDT, JR. COURT ROOM OF THE RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE HALL, 131 NORTH MAPLE AVENUE, RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY ON SEPTEMBER 25, 2019 AT 7:30 P.M.

 

  1. CALL TO ORDER – OPEN PUBLIC MEETINGS ACT – ROLL CALL

 

Mayor Hache called the meeting to order at 7:59 P.M. and read the Statement of Compliance with the Open Public Meetings Act.  At roll call the following were present: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, and Mayor Hache.  Also present were Heather Mailander, Village Manager/Village Clerk; Matthew Rogers, Village Attorney; and Donna Jackson, Deputy Village Clerk.  Councilwoman Walsh was absent.

 

  1. ORDINANCES

 

 

  1. INTRODUCTION – #3750 – Amend Chapter 265 – Vehicles and Traffic – 15 Minute Parking Meter on East Ridgewood Avenue

 

Mayor Hache moved the first reading of ordinance 3750.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        Councilwoman Walsh

ABSTAIN:      None

 

The Village Clerk read ordinance 3750 by title:

 

AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 265 OF THE CODE OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC, AT SECTION 265-29, “PARKING METER ZONE DESIGNATED”

 

Councilwoman Knudsen moved that ordinance 3750 be adopted on first reading and that October 7, 2019 be fixed as the date for the hearing thereon.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion. 

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        Councilwoman Walsh

ABSTAIN:      None

 

  1. PUBLIC HEARING - #3746 – Bond Ordinance – Zabriskie-Schedler House – Phase III

 

Mayor Hache moved the reading of ordinance 3746 by title on second reading and that the Public Hearing thereon be opened.  Councilwoman Knudsen seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        Councilwoman Walsh

ABSTAIN:      None

 

The Village Clerk read ordinance 3746 by title:

 

BOND ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR IMPROVEMENTS TO ZABRISKIE-SCHEDLER HOUSE PHASE III IN AND BY THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD, IN THE COUNTY OF BERGEN, NEW JERSEY, APPROPRIATING $158,000 THEREFOR AND AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE OF $78,000 BONDS OR NOTES OF THE VILLAGE TO FINANCE PART OF THE COST THEREOF

 

Mayor Hache stated that the entire Village Council should vote on this bond ordinance, and since Councilwoman Walsh is not present this evening, they will be continuing the Public Hearing and final vote to their October Public Meeting.  The Public Hearing on Ordinance 3746 was advertised for this evening, so anyone wishing to comment may do so at this time.  He stated that the Public Hearing was now open. 

 

There were no comments from the public, and Mayor Hache moved that the Public Hearing on ordinance 3746 be continued to October 7, 2019.  Councilman Sedon seconded the motion.  

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Voigt, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        Councilwoman Walsh

ABSTAIN:      None

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. RESOLUTIONS

 

THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTIONS, NUMBERED 19-320 THROUGH 19-326, WERE ADOPTED BY A CONSENT AGENDA WITH ONE VOTE BY THE VILLAGE COUNCIL, AND WERE READ BY TITLE ONLY:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. ADJOURNMENT

 

There being no further business to come before the Village Council, Councilwoman Knudsen made a motion to adjourn, seconded by Councilman Sedon, and carried unanimously by voice vote, the Village Council’s Special Public Meeting was adjourned at 8:05 P.M.

 

 

 

 

______________________________

                                                                                  Ramon M. Hache, Sr.                                                  

Mayor                        

 

 

______________________________

          Donna M. Jackson

        Deputy Village Clerk

  • Hits: 43

A REGULAR WORK SESSION OF THE VILLAGE COUNCIL OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD HELD IN THE SYDNEY V. STOLDT, JR. COURT ROOM OF THE RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE HALL, 131 NORTH MAPLE AVENUE, RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY ON AUGUST 7, 2019 AT 7:30 P.M.

 

  1. CALL TO ORDER – OPEN PUBLIC MEETINGS ACT – ROLL CALL – FLAG     SALUTE

 

Mayor Hache called the meeting to order at 7:30 P.M. and read the Statement of Compliance with the Open Public Meetings Act.  At roll call the following were present: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Walsh, and Mayor Hache.  Also present were Heather Mailander, Village Manager/Village Clerk; Donna Jackson, Deputy Village Clerk; and Matthew Rogers, Village Attorney. Councilman Voigt was absent.

 

Mayor Hache led those in attendance in the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag as well as in a Moment of Silence to honor the brave men and women serving in our armed forces and all our first responders, as well as Judy Caruso, beloved nurse at Travell School for over 20 years who passed away recently.

 

  1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

 

Ronald A. Rozenweig, Woodfield Realty, 4 Wilsey Square, stated he was here tonight because there was something on the agenda which he believes has been removed, which was for the Village to remove two of the four 15 minute parking spaces on the eastbound side of West Ridgewood Avenue.  He was at the meeting on behalf of his tenants who are greatly concerned about the impact this would have on the viability of their businesses.  Five of the tenants are concerned because they have small businesses which rely on in and out businesses, such as Puzo’s Pizza, Davis Surgical Supply, The Wine Seller, West Side Bagel, and Pazzazed.  They are all concerned about the loss of business and the viability of their businesses with the loss of those parking spaces.  Mr. Rozenweig added that the right hand turn lane is rarely used anyway, and most people coming to that intersection are taking a left to come into town, so removing those two parking spaces makes no sense.  There are other solutions which are easily available and would leave those four parking spaces which are the only four parking spaces on that whole block and are the ones that those businesses rely on. 

 

Lee Warren, 140 Washington Place, stated that she came home from vacation to come to this meeting because she was made aware of the taking away of parking on West Ridgewood Avenue.  She wants to be sure the Village was aware of how much these businesses that surround these parking spots give back to our community.  They support Lax Day, Ridgewood Jamboree, baseball events, Graydon swim team, Ridgewood High School swim team, and other events.  She asked if the reason they were going to take away two fifteen minute spaces was because someone in Ridgewood was impatient and wants to make a right, but can’t.  Ms. Warren added that it was absurd, and she was worried about the businesses as well as the children who cross at these intersections to go into town.  She suggested that with the right on red, which is the right of way for the cross walk people; it might be more dangerous for those walking across the street.

 

Ms. Warren stated that between 9 and 11 there were 19 people who used those parking spots, no one longer than seven minutes, on the most deserted week in Ridgewood.  This is a very busy parking area and we cannot afford to take those spots away from the townspeople and the businesses that are trying to stay afloat.  She also asked if the bike lane was disappearing.

 

Tom Shanley, proprietor of The Wine Seller, 6 West Ridgewood Avenue, stated that he has been in this store for five years and sees this intersection every day.  The last thing that the Village Council needs to do is to increase speeds in that area.  He has seen cars hitting cars, cars hitting school buses, and knocking down lampposts.  The lights that were put on the bicycle rack got knocked over twice.  If anything, something needs to be done to make it safer.  People who park across the street are going to be crossing West Ridgewood Avenue with the light red, and there will now be a third lane of traffic zipping through to make the right on red.  Mr. Shanley said that within a year they would have a big serious injury there, not to mention that during the school year between 3:00 P.M. and 4:00 P.M. that sidewalk is full of kids horsing around.  Now, there are going to be cars flying down hugging that curb while the kids are playing around.  He asked the Village Council why it was dropped from the agenda this evening.

 

Mark Berchardi, Westside Bagels, 2 Wilsey Square, stated that he has owned Westside Bagels for eleven years and those parking spots are the lifeblood of his business.  The average customer that comes into his store spends less than ten minutes in the store.  They park there and some park across the street, but most don’t because they have to wait to cross at the light.  Taking away two of those spots at any time of the day will significantly impact his business.  He stated that the last thing this Village can afford is to have any open real estate in the downtown area.  Between 3:00 P.M. and 4:00 P.M. during the school year is one of the busiest parts of his day.  He has kids from GW who walk to his store every day to get a snack after school. Also, to increase the traffic flow in that area is very dangerous.  Mr. Berchardi asked that the Village Council consider the comments that have been put before them tonight.  He added that he has signatures of 75 customers who have signed a petition asking the Village not to remove those parking spots.

 

Jenny Shanley, The Wine Seller, 6 West Ridgewood Avenue, stated that she is a logical person and this just isn’t logical to her.  She asked if the Village Council took an aerial view of what that intersection looks like, as it doesn’t make sense to her that taking away those two spots would actually alleviate what the Village is trying to do.  She thinks they would have to take all four spots away to make it work.  She added that it is West Ridgewood Avenue, not Route 17, and asked if this was something that they were going to do throughout Ridgewood.  Across the street at the train station they took down trees, grass, and green area to create more parking spots which is an ongoing battle in Ridgewood.  Pedestrian safety is going to be the biggest issue of all, as they would like to keep the kids, pedestrians, and visitors who come to town spend their money here, safely.

 

Phil Dolce, 625 Kingsbridge Lane, stated that on behalf of the residents on the East side of the Village, he wanted to thank the Village Council for not turning the Schedler property into a 90 foot baseball field with lights, refreshment stands and overwhelming traffic.  He thanked the Village Council for planting trees along the historic Saddle River Road and Route 17.  Mr. Dolce thanked the Village Council for recognizing the historic value of the Schedler House.  The house already is listed on the Village Master Plan as an historic home and is eligible for National and State listing for its historic value.  As soon as an archaeological evaluation is finished he is sure it will be on National and State registers.  This historic Schedler House is in disrepair, but only because of eight years of neglect by the previous Village Manager and the previous Council majority.  The house was livable when it was purchased originally.  Local neighbors on the east side have already spent $10,000 of their own money since 2009 to prevent the house from further ruin by putting on tarps and are prepared to put up even more money to aid in the restoration or use of the house.  This is their dedication as it is important. 

 

Mr. Dolce thanked the Village Council for understanding the significant negative effects that closing the Glen School had on residents of the east side.  Closing that school was absolutely devastating, not only because it affected property values and students, but it injured the sense of community that only a school gives to a local area.  Therefore, the Schedler House and the property are the only way of restoring the sense of community in that area.  Finally, he thanked the Village Council for realizing that the residents of the east side are not second class citizens, but tax paying residents that deserve equal treatment with the rest of the Village.  There are 568 homes that pay over $9 million in taxes, but they do not have the facilities that are given to the middle of town.

 

Kathryn Schmidt, 123 South Irving Street, stated that she wanted to continue some of the themes here.  She is a huge fan of 15 minute parking spaces as the convenience of running in and out is really important.  She added that she is very supportive of increasing parking as much as they can and she echoed the sentiments of others asking why the Village Council would remove these spaces.  This is not Route 17 or the Thruway, so she hoped that they could preserve those parking spaces.

 

Ms. Schmidt added that she is very supportive of Schedler, but when she saw the price tag she was shocked.  She asked that they make sure that there is a good roof over the top of it before they spend all of this money, but she thinks they are going in the right direction.  She added that she would like to see the topic of Air Babb come up again, as she thinks there is a way that it can be done without bothering neighbors.  Finally, she gets a lot of her information about what is going on by reading the blogs and Facebook pages, and that it has become so obvious that what you say matters and she continues to be amazed at the language that is being used.  At the end of the day it is not helping to bring our community together, which is not the way we should be acting.  She added that she hopes that on all levels they can tone down the rhetoric.

 

Anne Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that she would like to know if it would be possible in the week or so after Graydon closes before the water is drained, if there could be a dog day at Graydon.  She added that she thinks it would be wonderful as the parks were recently opened to dogs, and perhaps an exception could be made of a one day event at Graydon.  It is her recollection that in the week or so after Graydon closes, there is a Village employee party at Graydon, so obviously it would not be that day.  Ms. Loving added that she wasn’t sure if she should ask Ms. Bigos or the Village Manager, but she thinks it would be a nice thing and she would like to put that request in.

 

There were no additional comments from the public.

 

Mayor Hache stated that he wanted to answer some of the questions and clarify the doubts.  There were some questions as to why the issue came up and why it was removed.  He would like to remind everyone that just because they discuss something, they are not deciding for or against something.  The item was pulled from the agenda at the last meeting because they had looked at some of the language because it was ambiguous.  Those two spots don’t actually exist and were never voted on by the Village Council.  He asked that it be removed from this agenda, as having it during the summer when there is the lowest amount of traffic going through that intersection would be a disservice.  He wanted to get input from the businesses and residents about that intersection.  Standing on that corner today would give a very different picture than what he would see in September.

 

Mayor Hache stated that the dog day at Graydon is a neat idea and he would imagine it would involve suspending of their ordinance.  Ms. Mailander stated that it would.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the issue of the two parking spaces was removed from the agenda because the Village Council can’t hold a public hearing to remove two parking spaces either way because the spots legally don’t exist.  If there is no ordinance that created those parking spaces they can’t rescind it because it just is not there.  The beauty of this process is that the businesses were all notified and have opportunity to come here this evening and voice their concerns.  They will have to go back now and revisit the spaces and go through a process to introduce those two parking spaces as an ordinance and then hold a public hearing for or against adopting that ordinance.  They have to go back to square one and create those spaces.  This is something that obviously they have to revisit and this Village Council is one of the most businesses friendly Village Council’s that she has seen in a very long time.

 

Mayor Hache stated that they can’t meet to remove something that doesn’t exist, but they would have to formally meet to have those spaces exist legally.  There is no ordinance to establish them, so they can’t rescind them, but they would have to create an ordinance to have them established legally.

 

  1. MANAGERS REPORT

 

Village Council Public Meeting – Ms. Mailander stated that the next Village Council Public Meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, August 14th at 8:00 P.M.  The next meeting after that will be the September 4th Work Session at 7:30 P.M.

 

Hudson Street Parking Lot – Ms. Mailander stated that she wanted to be sure that residents know that the Hudson Street Parking Lot will be closing on Monday, August 19th due to the construction of the new parking deck.  There have been signs up since last week in the parking lot but they are trying to spread the word as much as they can.  A groundbreaking ceremony for the parking garage will take place on September 7th at 9:00 A.M. and everyone is invited to attend.

 

Ash Trees – Ms. Mailander stated that several Ash trees on the Dayton Street side of Memorial Park at Van Neste Square have been examined and evaluated and have been found to be in decline.  For public safety reasons these trees are scheduled to be removed next week, weather permitting.

 

Note Sale – Ms. Mailander stated that yesterday there was a note sale and they sold $32,727,000 of notes, consisting of $15,197,000 bond anticipation notes, $17,000,000 Water Utility bond anticipation notes, and $530,000 Parking Utility bond anticipation notes.  This sale generated money for new projects of approximately $5,700,000 of general capital, and $6,860,000 of Water Utility capital.  The balance of the funds is used to roll over existing notes.  There were four bidders, TD Securities, Bank of New York, Oppenheimer and Company, and Jeffries.  TD Securities was the successful bidder by a very narrow margin with an annual interest rate of 1.75% and a variable interest cost of 1.309%.  This is the lowest net interest cost for short term borrowing our bond council has seen this year.  Bob Rooney will be working with Acacia to determine the amount and timing of future long and short term borrowing.

 

Bergen Bites Back! – Ms. Mailander stated that especially after heavy rains, please clean drains and gutters. Keep swimming pools adequately treated and please remove standing water.  It only takes seven days for mosquitos to grow and your efforts make a difference for everyone.

 

Healthbarn – Ms. Mailander stated that Healthbarn just completed its annual inspection by the New Jersey Department of Health Consumer, Environmental and Occupational Health Service and continues to be accredited by National Nutrition Education Standards and by adhering to National Safety Standards. 

 

Children’s Sensory and Butterfly Garden – Ms. Mailander stated that the Children’s Sensory and Butterfly Garden behind The Stable is currently in full bloom, and she encouraged people to come and visit.

 

“The Great Swamp: NJ’s Natural Heritage” – Ms. Mailander stated that this is a lecture by NJ photojournalist Jim Del Giudice and will take place Monday, August 12th in the Anne Zusy Youth Lounge from 10:00 A.M. to 11:30 A.M.  The history of the 7,000 acres that comprise the great swamp has been integral to the Passaic Valley Watershed.  Admission is $5 and registration is required.

 

Graydon Pool – Ms. Mailander reminded everyone that Graydon Pool is open daily from 10:00 A.M. to 7:30 P.M.  Late season hours begin on August 12th, weekday hours will be noon to 7:30 P.M. and weekdays/holidays 10:00 A.M. to 7:30 P.M.

 

Art Exhibit at The Stable – Ms. Mailander stated that the art exhibit entitled “Inside Small Works” there will be an artist reception on August 8th from 7:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.

 

Kasschau Memorial Shell – Ms. Mailander stated that tomorrow’s performance at the Kasschau Memorial Shell located on Veterans Field behind the Library, will be the last performance of the season, and the programs begins at 8:30 P.M.

 

Camps for Village Youth – Ms. Mailander stated that for the remainder of the summer there will be a wide variety of camps available for Village youth.  Skateboarding, golf, pony share, summer STEM, and lacrosse.

 

Ridgewood Guild – Ms. Mailander stated that the Ridgewood Guild provides free Movies under the Stars on Wednesday nights.  This evening was supposed to be The Sixth Sense, but due to the rain it was postponed until tomorrow night.  If it rains tomorrow night it will be screened on Wednesday August 14th.  The film will begin at approximately 8:30 P.M.  There is one additional movie, ET, on August 21st.  Bring a chair or a blanket and enjoy the show.

 

Chamber of Commerce Annual Car Show – Ms. Mailander stated that the Chamber of Commerce Annual Car Show will be around Memorial Park at Van Neste Square on Friday, September 6th from 6:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.  There is no rain date, and trophies are at 8:30 P.M.

 

Farmers Market – Ms. Mailander stated that the Farmers Market is open every Sunday through October 27th on the West Side of the Train Station from 9:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M.  She encouraged people to come and meet the farmers.  The Ridgewood Farmers Market is a real farmers market and is brought to us by the members of the Ridgewood Chamber of Commerce.

 

Bergen County Utilities Authority – Ms. Mailander stated that there is a free recycling event on Saturday, August 17th from 9:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. at Bergen Community College.  They will collect old tires, computers, and electronics.  And there is a mobile paper shredding truck that will be there.  This event is rain or shine and requires proof of residency.

 

Mayors Wellness Festival – Ms. Mailander stated that the Mayor’s Wellness Festival is slated for Sunday, September 22nd from 11:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. in Memorial Park at Van Neste Square.  All local health, medical, fitness and wellness providers are invited to participate.  This year there will be a healthy food court and a picnic area.

 

  1. COUNCIL REPORTS

 

Historic Preservation Commission – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Historic Preservation Commission is canceled for tomorrow evening.

 

Planning Board – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Planning Board met last night and went over their new by-laws that should be adopted two meetings from now.  Mayor Hache added that they swore in Allison Wesner as the new Class 4 member of the Planning Board last night.

 

Master Plan Advisory Board Meeting – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they met last night and Neil Desai of NV5 reviewed the results of the Visioning Process with the committee.  They had invited some members of the public to join them, and it was interesting that it came up in the visioning results of the survey that many folks are uncomfortable with the rhetoric on social media as it relates to Ridgewood topics and they feel that it can be taken down a few notches.  They also had the opportunity to hear from the new planner and they were concerned about historic preservation throughout the Village and the Schedler House.  The planner gave them a road map for both private and public property as to how they can do a better job preserving historic structures throughout the Village and those that many feel give the charming character and history to the Village.

 

Car Show – Councilwoman Walsh added that if anyone had vehicles that they think would be worthy of the show you can get an application with the Chamber of Commerce on their website.

 

Hudson Street Parking Garage – Mayor Hache stated that the Village Manager, Village Engineer, Deputy Mayor, and himself took a drive out to Denver, Pennsylvania last week to visit the company that is preparing the precast concrete for the Hudson Street Parking structure and had a tour of the facility and saw the quality of the construction of the pieces that will be assembled here.  They have officially signed off on the materials and the colors that they will use and they are moving forward.  The groundbreaking is September 7th but the lot actually goes under construction August 19th

 

Councilwoman Knudsen added that CFO, Bob Rooney, joined them on the visit to Hyde Concrete and they had an opportunity to view an augmented reality version of our structure through a holo- lens and see the garage in a lot of dimensions.  They will receive a copy of that video and will get as much of that information online as possible.  There is a lot of video and pictures of how they pour and create the concrete pieces.

 

Mayor Hache stated that for the groundbreaking ceremony on September 7th, Table at Latonas has generously offered to provide coffee and continental breakfast of everyone afterwards.

 

Central Business District Advisory Committee – Mayor Hache stated that CBDAC is meeting tomorrow.

 

125th Anniversary – Mayor Hache stated that the 125th Anniversary Committee met this week and were celebrating the fact that they were moving forward with the Ridgewood Community Foundation which is a 501(c)3 organization that will help to promote a lot of activities in town and will help fund the activities of the boards and committees.  This is a good opportunity for those committees to raise money.  The 125th Anniversary Gala will take place on November 2nd at Events by Felina, which should be opening in October.

 

  1. DISCUSSION

 

  1. Budget

 

  1. Schedler House Rehabilitation

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they went out for bids which were higher than the amount they had appropriated.  These are prequalified bidders because it is an historic structure.  It was rebid on August 1st and the Village received three bids.  They bid package requested bids for three items and using the aggregate, Dell-Tech of Trenton was the lowest bidder at $1,126,250.  The Village currently doesn’t have that total amount available; however, there are options as to how they would like to award this because it was bid as A, B, and C.

 

Tom Connolly, Principal Architect of Connolly and Hickey Historical Architects, stated that they are the firm that prepared the contract documents for the interior and exterior restoration of the Zabriskie-Schedler House, and prepared some of the historical reports which enabled some of the grants that the Village received from Bergen County.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they have a fiduciary obligation to taxpayer dollars, but also are stewards of our resources and our historic grounds and structures.  So, they want to make sure they get this right and she was interested in understanding his perspective of how the price tag went from $7-800,000 to the $1.1 million.  Mr. Connolly stated that their estimates were completed in 2016 and before any contract documents were prepared.  So, maybe they didn’t understand the full scope of the work.  A larger part of the issue is the economy.  He received a letter from another contractor that it is a super-hot economy; costs have skyrocketed; and everybody is busy.  The last time they did see something like this was in 2005 or 2006, when estimates for this type of work meant nothing.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if the prequalification process affects this.  Mr. Connolly stated that their pool of contractors that they can pull from for restoration has to comply with the Secretary of the Interior Standards for Rehabilitation of Historic Properties.  It says they have to guide the restoration process.  There are a few qualified contractors in the State that can perform this work.  New contractors get qualified in the State, but it is a process.

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that typically when you see estimates, you see general requirements.  What is glaring on these three is that one person has $106,000 and the next bid is $10,000.  She is trying to determine what the Dell-Tech bids are.  Mr. Connolly stated that it is unfortunate that they have to break things down this way, but they know the contractors and how they put bids together.  Looking at the bottom line, they are generally close to where they are. When they put the bid together, they put money all over the place.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that the challenge they see all the time is Change Orders.  She wondered if the low bidder would request a Change Order to bring a low estimate up to the correct amount.  Mr. Connolly stated that they go through these bids line by line and understand what these contractors include and felt that Dell-Tech’s bid was right on.  Councilwoman Walsh reiterated that the last thing they want are Change Orders.  Mr. Connolly stated that they typically allow for unforeseen conditions in restoration work of about 10% to 15%, but they are already over that right off the bat.

 

Councilwoman Walsh asked if their bid would then correlate with the descriptions.  So, if they look at the price for finishes, it will be defined that they can’t come back and describe something else.  Mr. Connolly stated that they are required to do what is in the contract documents, and there is no way he will allow them to not complete something if it is in black and white.  Unforeseen conditions exist, but they have unit prices in the project for things such as that.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that was her biggest concern because they were so variant.  Mr. Connolly stated that they get this question a lot and it is unfortunate that they have to break it down this way, but they put their money in different locations in the breakdown. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh asked if they could sign a guaranteed price with the contractors as they did with the parking garage.  Mayor Hache stated that it was a guaranteed maximum price, and then they work out a split between the difference of the GMP and the cost.  Mr. Connolly stated that whatever ends up on the contract document or the specifications is what you receive.  Even if there are unforeseen items or the architects miss, you receive what is on the contract documents.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she would like to see what that list is.  Mr. Connolly stated that they have that.  There is a schedule on the drawings.  Councilwoman Walsh asked if they were agreeing with their price for that.  Mr. Connolly agreed with that.

 

Councilman Sedon stated that it is sectioned off in project A, B, and C, and asked if Mr. Connolly could explain what that entails.  Mr. Connolly stated that they broke it up to get the project underway and to use some of the grant money they have.  They are hoping that the Village can get another grant in the future and most likely they would.  Historically once you start down the process of receiving grants, the granting agency likes to see the project through.  The goal is to get the building envelope project underway with A; B is the restrooms; and C is the finishes.  Councilman Sedon stated that finishes appear in project A, B, and C and when adding up all the work it, comes out pretty similar for all of the contractors.  There was some discussion on finishes, and Mr. Connolly stated that he wouldn’t try to dissect it that much but he knows how much these things cost.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they were just to move full steam ahead, how long would Mr. Connolly estimate this might take.  Mr. Connolly stated that it is going to take a year, maybe a little less depending on the contractor.  They just completed a full interior restoration in Clifton and it took a full year.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked how long it would take to do the exterior building envelope.  Mr. Connolly stated that it would take less than six months.  Councilwoman Knudsen cited what Dr. Dolce said during his public comment.  She added that the residents on the east side of town have been living with the house in this condition for more than a decade and it is fundamentally unfair to our fellow residents who live in that neighborhood.  She added that it is important that they get this moved forward and can see at least a polished exterior so that the neighbors have a sense of comfort that the neighborhood is what it should be.

 

Mayor Hache thanked Mr. Connolly for coming tonight and added that he has been a supporter of the Schedler property and house.  His concern here is that when they looked at the original estimate, they were looking at something in the neighborhood of project B and they were now 60% to 80% higher than the original estimate.  In the course of time, they are acting and basing their decisions on certain assumptions.  Ms. Mailander stated they have the original estimates and she would share that with the Village Council after Mayor Hache completed his comments.  Mayor Hache stated that his concern is that to begin the project they are 60% to 80% higher and haven’t put one shovel in the ground and as they know now, it always costs more than the estimate.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the original estimate was broken into two phases and then with the asbestos the total project was estimated to $784,800.  They currently have applied for three rounds of grants through Bergen County Historic Preservation.  Phase 1 was the roof stabilization and planning documents.  The grant amount was $116,724 which is a 50/50 matching grant.  Phase 2A was exterior stabilization and interior rehabilitation and that was a total cost of $400,000 so it was $200,000 for each of the grant and the Village.  Phase 2B was the interior rehabilitation which was estimated at $151,300 so that was $75,650 for the grant and the Village each.  It is a total of $392,375 from the Village and from the grants which equals the $784,750.  Ms. Mailander stated that as Mr. Connolly stated, part of the reason that it has increased so dramatically is that they are busy.  The material costs have gone up between 8% and 40% not concluding the tariffs that have effecting lighting and HVAC.  Material costs keep changing; contractors are building in larger buffers in their budget due to prevailing wage as well.  The minimum wage is going up and that affects prevailing wage which the Village is required to pay.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they can apply for more grants next year, and so they currently have enough money to do A and C which is exterior and ADA improvements, or they can do A or C, and then go out for additional grants next year for the interior of the house.  This is up to the Village Council.  Mayor Hache stated that looking at the 25% tariff and the increases on minimum wage; he still doesn’t understand the increase 60% to 80% above the original estimate.  He thinks they are padding their numbers and better sharpen their pencils.  Mr. Connolly stated that they rebid the project and re-did the scope and the cost of the project didn’t come down that much.  Their estimates were done prior to doing the contract documents and his partner who does the estimates is a certified cost estimator with the State of NJ.  She is typically very good at putting estimates together for restoration, but they found in this economy, it is one of four projects that they have in the same predicament.

 

Councilman Sedon asked if there was anything that Mr. Connolly would see going through that would greatly increase the cost.  Mr. Connolly stated that the greatest thing was the asbestos, adding that it was not unusual for projects of this type to have change orders but if they do, they are usually minor in the $100s or just a thousand dollars and are for minor things.  They are doing all the structure, which is part of the project; the barrier free component is in there.  Light safety and electrical are on there, but he can’t see through walls.  They assumed a few things for the structure.  Mayor Hache asked what percentage of the project cost is labor.  Mr. Connolly said that he couldn’t tell off the top of his head, but he could get that for the Village Council.  He added that would it be in the general requirements number and probably percentage wise.  They do have a contingency for each phase, so the project could come in less than 1% if all goes well.  Mr. Connolly stated that it was approximately 13% if he took their general requirements and he doesn’t know what else they have in there that could be scaffolding and other things.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they were to award project A and project C and move forward, could they actually go out and rebid project B.  Mr. Connolly stated of course.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that if they started to do the exterior work and they get that started. Then the biggest hit is on that project B anyway, so they could back out and rebid that.  It is quite possible that there is a change in that pool of available prequalified contractors to choose from and it is also possible that economic conditions will change somewhat.  They will have to roll the dice that it doesn’t actually come back higher, which is one of the options that is available, as well.  Mr. Connolly stated that would narrow it and he would recommend rebidding project B and narrowing the scope.  With project B you are focused on just the interior.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that at this point they have a resolution to award if the Village Council would like to, but they could also put it off until September.  There was a consensus between Councilwoman Knudsen and Councilman Sedon that they were ready to move forward with project A and C.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she felt like she wanted to go back and take a look as she doesn’t remember seeing a line item for all of the items, and asked when they received that.  Ms. Mailander stated that she didn’t know if they ever got it.  Mr. Connolly stated that there is no actual breakdown of the contract documents which are architectural plans and you are getting what’s on those drawings.  Councilwoman Walsh asked if they could get this on the next agenda.  Ms. Mailander stated that would be September 4th.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she wanted to review all of the data a little bit more. 

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the problem she now sees is that they will have not awarded the contract which is an issue of timing because they want to get a roof on the building finally, after years of tarps at the expense of the generosity of our residents.  She asked if it was an issue of timing if the contract isn’t awarded and they wait until September.  Mr. Connolly stated that since they first started drafting the documents until now, the deterioration of the building has accelerated and it will continue to do so.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that this is an issue of the neighborhood and community and she would like to move forward at this point.  Mayor Hache stated that the concern is how they got from $700,000 to $1.2 million.  His fear is that they start digging and they find more problems that add to the cost.  He added that he was willing to commit to a guaranteed maximum price.  Mr. Connolly stated that was what the contractor was doing by signing the contract as they are obligated to do what’s on the contract documents, which is the restoration of the house.  Mayor Hache asked what the profit margin is of the project.  Mr. Connolly stated that he didn’t know.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they could discuss it again on September 4th and in the meantime they could have a Special Public Meeting that evening.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they could wait until September, but that wasn’t changing the price.  Mr. Connolly stated that they were obligated to hold their price for X amount of days.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that whether they do this at this point or September, the price isn’t changing.  So, the only thing at question is whether or not they are willing to spend this money for this historic preservation.  As Dr. Dolce pointed out, the community has nothing since the Glen School closed, but the price point doesn’t change until September, they are going to lose another month before getting this project moving, the deterioration is accelerating, and she doesn’t see the price changing. 

 

Mayor Hache stated that it isn’t a matter of price but where is the funding as they were working under particular assumptions.  Mr. Connolly stated that it wasn’t unusual for this to happen.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the funding is in place for A and C.  Mayor Hache stated that they were funding for a particular estimated cost, and that means that now the funding falls short of the cost of the project. So, how does that gap get filled.  Ms. Mailander stated that they could go for grants again next year and can bond.  Mr. Connolly stated that historically, once you start down the path with grants and are awarded grants they tend to see the project through and this is not uncommon for the cost to increase as you move forward with a restoration.  Mayor Hache stated that he agreed with Councilwoman Walsh and wanted to look at this further. 

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked when the next public meeting is.  Ms. Mailander stated that it was Wednesday.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they could have the information being requested by Tuesday next week.  Mr. Connolly stated that they could have it tomorrow.  Councilwoman Knudsen said that they should put it on the agenda for Wednesday, August 14th.  She thinks the residents in that neighborhood are entitled to see this come to some conclusion as quickly as possible, and she thinks that the residents are owed at least some modicum of expediency.  Mayor Hache added that he thinks the residents are owed a bit more diligence on this because they don’t have all of the information.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked when everyone got the packets.  Ms. Mailander stated that the information with the questions and answers was handing out this evening.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked about A, B, and C.  Ms. Mailander stated that it was last week.  Councilman Sedon stated that they should wait until everyone feels more comfortable.  They need a resolution to this but he thinks that people need to feel comfortable one way or another and more time is required for that.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that at some point; you drag your feet for a decade; and here we are tonight with an opportunity to change the trajectory of where this is leading; and she suggested adding to the agenda for next week.

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that she understands the lowest bidder on concrete estimated $11,000 while the other two received the same specs and came out to $48,520 and $52,500.  She asked if their guy underbid to get the job and then they are going to get a change order.  Mr. Connolly stated that they were not going to get a change order, as he is required to do the work laid out.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that was the piece that she didn’t feel that she had a handle on.  Mr. Connolly stated that by taking a look at line item 5, you will see there are variations there.  As well, you can’t look at these breakdowns because they throw numbers all over the place.  This is meant more for the architects because they understand how it works.  There was some additional discussion about the concrete work. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that the estimates are all over the place, and she asked what the true estimates are line by line because they do so many change orders a year.  Ms. Mailander stated that they do several change orders a year, but asked if Councilwoman Walsh was saying that the only time they would have a change order on this bid is if she found something that wasn’t on this bid.  Mr. Connolly stated that as long as it’s on his drawings they are obligated to install it.  Ms. Mailander and Mr. Connolly were in agreement that the contractors are bound by those numbers to do whatever is stipulated on those drawings.  Ms. Mailander added that in her mind, the only time there was going to be a change order is if they encounter something in a wall that they didn’t realize was there.  Mr. Connolly agreed, but added that you would have to look at the contract documents to understand the project but it is all there. 

 

Ms. Mailander asked Mr. Connolly if he had some sort of estimate or cost breakdown in his mind of what he thought each item was going to cost.  Mr. Connolly stated that in his mind he didn’t prepare that, but it should be his original estimate.  Ms. Mailander clarified that it was the overall number and not line by line.  Mr. Connolly stated that looking at Dell Tech’s line items for specialties he has $0 but in the specifications it is for soap dispensers in the rest room, so he may have put that in another line which is a communication problem, but it is on their drawings and he is required to include those items.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she understood the documents and that they were using a computer system that probably assigned the values.  The contractors involved here are prequalified and so it is a very specialized area and the way they are breaking this out is probably very different than for your house. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that she doesn’t think it is very different from a house, and asked them to show her where the doorknobs and hinges are.  Mr. Connolly stated that there are about 40 pages of drawings, so there is no list as it is graphic.  Councilwoman Walsh asked where they are placing these items if not under specialties as Mr. Connolly had mentioned.  Mr. Connolly stated that it was on the contract documents and they are obligated to install everything that is on his contract documents. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh addressed the Village Attorney, Mr. Rogers, and asked if they sign off on anything like this other than the unforeseen, how they would protect the Village so that they can’t come back with any changes.  Mr. Connolly stated that was why the Village hired him so that he can make sure that they are doing everything that is on those contract documents.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that Mr. Connolly wasn’t the one that is guaranteeing what they are putting out.  Mr. Connolly stated that he was guaranteeing that they are installing what’s on those drawings, so if it’s not on his drawings it doesn’t get installed.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she understands that, but for her, if they are saying concrete work is $11,000 and there is no other concrete work being done and for the other bidders to have it four times as much she can’t see that.  Mr. Connolly stated that they should take the whole list away from the Village Council and just look at the bottom line because they are all right on top of one another and it is hard to dissect their numbers.

 

Councilwoman Walsh asked Mr. Rogers what the protections are that they can put in place legally for this to happen.  Mr. Rogers stated that it sounds like the protections are in the contract documents, but if there was a challenge to the price and a request for a change order or some other type of deviation, or change in terms of the work that is to be performed, they would have to look to the documents to try and identify where the particular issue is.  Just like any other contract that has detail to it; they are obligated to perform on accordance with their bid that was accepted.  Their experience is that there are deviations sometimes, and the detail on this is much more significant than you would normally find.  They have had some historic preservation work in the past with the train station plaza, and there were some issues with those but they may not have been as detailed in terms of the specifications.  You rely on those things to ensure that they are as sound as you can possibly get and you do whatever you can to protect it.

 

Mr. Connolly stated that he works for the Village and he is going to make sure that what is on those drawings is what the Village is going to get for that cost.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that Mr. Connolly would get that information to the Village Council tomorrow and then they would add it to next week’s agenda.

 

Councilman Sedon made a motion to suspend the Work Session and convene a Special Public Meeting.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        Councilman Voigt

ABSTAIN:      None

 

  1. SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETING - SEE SEPARATE MINUTES

 

Mayor Hache called for a motion to adjourn, there was a motion by Councilman Sedon to adjourn the Special Public Meeting and reconvene the Work Session.   Mayor Hache seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        Councilman Voigt

ABSTAIN:      None

 

  1. DISCUSSION

 

  1. Ridgewood Water

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – 2020 Ford Escape

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is a resolution in the amount is $26,349 for the purchase of a 2020 Ford Escape through the Sourcewell Cooperative Pricing National Auto Fleet Group of Watsonville, California.  It will replace resolution 19-158 which was adopted on June 12, 2019.  The date to order a 2019 model had expired so this is for a 2020 model.  Mayor Hache asked about the difference in price between the Police Department vehicles and the Water Department vehicle.  Ms. Mailander stated that she was told that the floor mats and the cargo mat made the difference in the price, but she would confirm that.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that the sticker price may be one thing, but they may be getting a discount.  Mayor Hache stated that $1,500 was too much for the floor and cargo mats that they were proposing on the police vehicles.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would figure out the pricing and let the Village Council know.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Pumps and Motors – Repair, Replacement and Installation – NSI Neal Systems

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this resolution is to purchase items related to the maintenance of pumps and motors and to award it under the North Jersey Wastewater Cooperative Pricing Systems of Newtown, PA not to exceed $26,000.  The materials are for the calibration of meters.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Pumps and Motors – Repair, Replacement and Installation – Universal Electric Motor

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for state purchase from Universal Electric Motor of Hackensack.  This is not to exceed $20,000 and is for repair and replacement of electric pumps and is under the North Jersey Wastewater Cooperative Pricing System.

 

  1. Parking

 

  1. Request for Loading Zone at Train Station

 

Ms. Mailander stated that there is a request for the loading zone at the Train Station.  The Village has an agreement with a vendor to operate the coffee stand at the Train Station, and that person recently received a ticket while setting up for the day’s customers early one morning.  The vendor’s employee did not have a parking permit nor would they qualify for one as they are not a Ridgewood resident.  There is a picture where there is a space that is not striped as a parking stall, so they are recommending that this be designated as a loading zone for the coffee concession stand and later for the deliveries that Social Services receives for its facility.

 

Mayor Hache asked if it would be marked as a loading zone.  Ms. Mailander stated that it would be, and it would be short term as loading zones are.

 

  1. Reserved Parking Spaces at the Train Station

 

Ms. Mailander stated that one reserved parking space is for the New Jersey Transit representative per the agreement with New Jersey Transit.  The other parking space would be for the operator of the concession stand and then Social Services.  The concession stand would have it until 10:30 A.M. and then Social Services would use it after that.

 

Mayor Hache asked if the spaces were in the agreements for the concession stand or Social Services.  Ms. Mailander stated that it wasn’t in their agreements.  Mayor Hache stated that he thought they should consider memorializing this agreement as being part of what is included.  Ms. Mailander stated that in addition to doing this, Mr. Rogers could perhaps write up an agreement for this one space to be shared by Social Services and the concession stand.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked how much of the day they will be using that space.  Ms. Mailander stated that in the loading zone she didn’t know, but this is for a parking space.

 

  1. Request to Amend Parking Ordinance – Monte Vista Avenue

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for Monte Vista Avenue, Park Slope, North Hillside Place, and Madison Place.  The proposed parking changes were sent out to 57 residents of the area and they received 12 responses.  The majority was in favor of the change to 4 hours, but there were some other preferences. 

 

Mayor Hache stated that the reason this was brought to them was with the commuters and he agreed that Saturday wasn’t necessary.  Councilman Sedon stated that there are usually spaces in the Train Station parking lot on Saturday, adding that he would be good with Monday through Friday unless Saturday is a problem in the future.  There is also wide support for four hours which gives enough time for service people and cuts down on confusion if it is throughout the neighborhood.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that inevitably people park in front of your house because it is a public street, and she agreed with the majority regarding Saturday.  Everyone was in agreement about the four hour parking limit.

 

  1. Budget

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Replacement of Carpeting at Several Village Hall Locations

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they re-carpeted several of the rooms in this building, some of them being the court room and several offices.  The next phase of that work will include the Village Clerk’s Office, Assessor’s Office, Violations, Water Department, and Building Department, in an amount not to exceed $44,122.92.  Brothers Flooring of Hackensack is under state contract and they do have this budgeted in the capital budget.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Two 2019 Chevrolet Tahoes – Police Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Police Department placed an order for two 2019 Chevrolet Tahoes with Day Chevrolet under the New Jersey State Purchasing Program.  They had to be ordered before April 15th in order to beat the closing of Chevrolet’s open ordering/production time because the State Contract expired May 1st

 

The Village submitted a Letter of Intent to Purchase contingent on the availability of funds.  The total amount is not to exceed $73,648.08.  There are also other vendors to outfit the cars.  The Tahoes will replace patrol cars #15 and #21, which are 2015 Ford Explorers and have exceeded their usable time as police cars.  Some of the equipment in those old cars will be used in the new ones.

 

Regional Communications will be used for emergency light and police car equipment supply and installation, and Motorola Solutions for multi-band car radios.  These are three separate resolutions.

 

  1. Award Contract – Change Order No. 1 – Train Station Parking Expansion

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they expanded the Train Station parking and realized it was a good time to complete several sections of the Gamewell fiber optic communications cable since it will be needed in the new parking garage.  They also relocated the traffic signal pole to improve the site radius as well as connected the signal’s electric supply to a meter circuit.  When it came time to resurface the lot it became apparent additional asphalt and milling was necessary.  The change order is in the amount of $64,361.95.  She pointed out that even with the change order it is still $69,000 less than the second lowest bidder.

 

  1. Declare Surplus – Police Department/Parking Enforcement – Two Ford Crown Victoria’s

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this resolution was to declare property surplus for two Police Department 2011 Ford Crown Victoria’s.  They are in need of repairs with estimated costs exceeding the value of the vehicles, including the engine and air conditioning.  The expense to repair them exceeds the value of the vehicles, so they will be declared surplus.

 

  1. Parking Capital Bond Ordinance – Two Ford Escapes – Police Department/Parking Enforcement

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they need to write a bond ordinance for this, in the amount of $57,000 which will introduce and then they can award the contract after the adoption and effective date.

 

  1. General Capital Bond Ordinance – Purchase of Ford F350 Pickup – Traffic & Signal Division & 2019 Ford Ranger – Parks

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the purchase of the Ford F350 Pickup is for both the Traffic and Signal Division and a 2019 Ford Ranger for the Parks and Recreation Division.  For the Parks and Recreation Division, it is for the Supervisor to perform his day to day operations, transporting personnel and equipment, as well as checking on the condition of parks and fields.  It is a 2019 Ford Ranger through the Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing, National Auto Fleet Group of California, in an amount not to exceed $52,226.

 

The Traffic and Signal Ford F-350 Pickup will be purchased instead of the van that the contract was awarded for previously.  They were told by the Bond Council that they needed a different ordinance for the purchase of these vehicles, because the van is not the same lifespan or type of vehicle as the pickup.  Their recommendation was for a new bond ordinance and when that is adopted they can award both of these contracts.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they knew the year of the van that is being replaced.  Ms. Mailander stated part of it is they are going to add it to snowplowing, as well.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they usually have more information.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would get this information for her. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh asked if they were prohibited as a municipality from having a direct relationship with Ford.  Ms. Mailander stated that they would have to bid it, but that is why they go with State Contract Cooperative Purchasing. Councilwoman Walsh stated that she was asking because her company has contracted with Ford and they get a rebate check back from Ford each year and it is pretty substantial.  Mr. Rogers stated that local public contract law would not allow for that.  The only way they are able to do this so quickly is because Ford has qualified for the State Contract, so they go through that purchasing level rather than bidding it out.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that these prices are more than what she was paying at her company.  Ms. Mailander stated that is what happens with public purchasing, unfortunately.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that sometimes there are differences with heavy duty or special equipment.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that the Village was overpaying for the vehicles.

 

  1. General Capital Bond Ordinance – Re-Appropriating Funds – Purchase of Scarab Windrow Turner

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was re-appropriating funds for the purchase of a scarab windrow turner that is used at the Lakeview Composting Facility.  It is currently non-operational and is well beyond its useful life and repairs would be cost prohibitive.  It was determined that several previously approved Capital projects were no longer required and were completed with excess funds available.  The reappropriation of funds from these projects may be utilized for this purchase. 

 

  1. Increase Fire Prevention Inspection Fees

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Fire Department proposal is to increase the fees which haven’t been increased in eight years and it will put us more in line with other towns in Bergen County.  The State bills for the life hazard building inspections and gives the Village a percentage of the fees they collect.  Life Hazard Building inspections are inspections of bars, BYOB restaurants, and supermarkets.  Most of these increases are minimal.

 

Chief Van Goor stated that both the Fire Department and the State perform inspections.  The State charges and they increased their fees at the beginning of the year.  The Fire Department looked back at the ordinance to see if we had to change the ordinance based on that and realized we hadn’t changed our fees since 2011.  The Fire Department came up with increases because it has been eight years since there were increases. 

 

Inspector Krug stated that they were given leeway with how they wanted to address their fee schedule, and he reached out to towns with populations that are similar or slightly over.  Some of the proposed increases are smoke detector certifications, which they currently charge $75 for.  Recently, as of January 1st, the State has added to the code and increased the Village’s workload with that.  They find that the inspections take a minimum of two visits there, and they are looking to increase the fees to $100 which puts them in line with surrounding towns.  The other inspections that he has are businesses within the business district.  When they are talking about the Life Hazard Uses, BYOB fees are set by the State.  As an inspector, he goes out and performs the inspections and the State collects that fee and then reimburses the town.  Most of the fee changes have to do with mercantile stores, offices and multi-family dwellings. 

 

Instead of billing within the windows of units he would like to have a flat fee of $100 and then bill per number of units on that property.  Inspector Krug stated that he liked having the flat fee because in the past they have been billing a garden apartment complex, with seven buildings, $270 in the past, but if you really think about it, it is seven different structures.  They receive seven different fire alarm test reports, seven different sprinkler reports, and deal with issues in seven different buildings.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it makes sense to her as they are doing multiple works so they are right to approach it that way.  Mayor Hache stated that looking at the changes depending on the size of the business.  As the range of percentage increases going from 13% to 18% with the higher increases at the lower end and then for the mercantile the range of increases is 13% to 25%, and the 25% is at the lower end.  It seems that there is a big disparity there between them, but looking at the fire safety permits it looks pretty consistent.  Mayor Hache asked if they could be more consistent with the increases.  Inspector Krug stated that it was going up $10.  Mayor Hache stated that the percentages were about a 29% increase.  Chief Van Goor stated that those fees are set by the State of New Jersey.  Mayor Hache stated that the standard was applied unevenly and when looking at the fees that the Village is imposing, it’s not consistent.  Inspector Krug stated that there is an option where the Village could introduce an ordinance that says they just follow the State’s inspection fees and go that route.  These types of permits are for special events such as food trucks or a tent on your property.

 

Mayor Hache stated that the increases that are proposed here range from 13% to 18% with 18% at the low end.  Looking at the second category the range is 13% to 25%, and he was asking if there was a way to get the percentage increase more in line.  Inspector Krug stated that they could look at that.  Mayor Hache asked if the consideration was in terms of keeping in line with the dollar increases that the State has.  Inspector Krug stated that it was to keep it in line with other towns, and he would see that discrepancy within the current fees, as well.  He added that when he worked with the Chief he came up with the average increase of 16%, and some of that is just due to rounding out figures.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that looking at the increase at 0-500 square feet, the increase is $10 but looking at a large square footage the increase is $40, and even though that percentage isn’t actually greater, there must be more involved in that particular location.  Mayor Hache asked if it was more work to do a smaller building than a larger one.  Chief Van Goor stated that there is a lot more scheduling involved in smaller inspections, chasing down owners, phone calls, and arranging appointments.  For a larger building, it is easier to meet just a building director.  Mayor Hache stated that then these amounts are not arbitrary, but are correlated to the amount of work that is necessary for those structures.  There was additional discussion about the size of buildings and the percent increase.  Chief Van Goor stated that every inspection is done differently.  The only thing that is uniform is the code that he enforces.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Six Panasonic Tough Books – Police Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that there are several different computer and printer related contracts to award.  This is for six Toughbooks for the Police department.  Wireless Communications is a vendor through state contract, with a cost not to exceed $30,847.80.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Server Upgrade

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for a server upgrade for the E-Ticket program and new Finance Server to replace the current system.  This is under State Contract to Dell of Round Rock, Texas in an amount not to exceed $41,695.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Printer Upgrades and Replacements

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for printer upgrades and replacements for Finance, Water, Engineering, Police, and EMS.  The quote is for 13 printers in total and will be under State Contract to SHI of Somerset, not to exceed $24,079.81.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Ruggedized Switches and Network Upgrades – Various Departments

 

Ms. Mailander stated that ruggedized switches are meant for areas of high and low humidity such as Graydon Pool, Pump Houses, Storage Areas, and Lockboxes.  This is under state contract to SHI of Somerset not to exceed $18,154.60.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Aruba Switches and Network Upgrades – Various Departments

 

Ms. Mailander stated this was to handle the increase of data.  Separate certain data points to elevate possible bottlenecking and increase efficiency on backups by creating a management network.  With the onset of utilizing ip based phones, security cameras, and other node, the increase of bandwidth is needed in order for the network to run at an optimal state.  The current switches are between 4 and 8 years of age and are showing some signs of degradation.  The State Contract is to SHI of Somerset, not to exceed $92,239.14.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Public Access and Wifi Upgrade – Village Facilities and Park Locations

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was for Wifi equipment and to expand coverage in Village facilities/park locations.  This contract is with SHI of Somerset, not to exceed $28,151.00.  Mayor Hache asked if the wifi upgrade was going to include Van Neste Square in the scope.  Mr. Hansen stated that it would.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Renewal of Annual Spatial Data Logic Software License

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for the renewal of spatial data logic software license for one year.  IT is currently used by the Building Department for permits and zoning and the Health Department for pet licensing.  They will be looking into integrating the system into the ESRI Project.  The price for renewal is $31,250 and will be awarded under stated contract to SHI of Somerset.

 

  1. Award Contract – Leaf Collection Services for Area B – Public Works Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they bid out the leaf pickup for Area B and had two planholders eligible to bid and received one bid.  The sole bid was $79,800.00.  The proposal calls for the contractor to make three pickups in section B, collect the leaves, and then transport them to the Lakeview Compost Facility.  The bidder was Faircut Services of Montville, and this is a first year for them.  For the past two years, the contracts were $88,500 and $92,460.  Councilwoman Sedon asked if they were fully aware of the scope of work that’s involved, and asked if there was any way it could go up.  Ms. Mailander stated that they have to do it at this price and do not get a change order.  They also assign an employee to check up on section B to make sure that they are being picked up in a timely manner.  This is a new vendor and they are looking forward to working with them.

 

  1. Declare Surplus – Streets Department – Paving Box

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is to declare a paving box surplus, and then once it is declared surplus it will be sold on GovDeals.com.

 

  1. Resolution Cancelling General Capital Ordinance Balances

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is a resolution cancelling general capital ordinance balances.  The CFO and the Treasurer have revised all general capital bond ordinances, some have been completed or circumstances have changed.  There are balances that are left from purchases that have already been made.  They are going to cancel as shown in the attachment, which will result in a reduction in deferred charges unfunded and monies being restored to the General Capital Fund Balance.

 

  1. Award Professional Services Contract – Professional Planning Consultant

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they were working to correct a diversion of open spaces in the Village of Ridgewood. Topology NJ of Newark was hired last year to provide professional consulting services on this matter.  There is a need to extend this professional agreement to help guide this issue to final resolution with Green Acres.  It will be an amount not to exceed $35,000.  They will prove valuable as the Village moves through the application process, which was recommended by Green Acres.  Once through the application process, ultimately you have to be approved by the State Legislature.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she didn’t understand whether or not they were trying to take a different approach with this as they made applications in good faith and are being held up by this even though the property still went to public use.  She added that she didn’t know where it was written that they could hold this money up, and asked if they looked into that at all.  Mr. Rogers stated that he has not looked into the legality of whether they have the authority to withhold the funding that our taxpayers contribute, but he assumes they would.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that this is something that happened decades ago and here the Village taxpayers are taking a hit. 

 

Mr. Rogers stated that he thought their position was arbitrary in the beginning when they say that the amount of money that was spent on Schedler and Habernickel doesn’t get considered with regard to this because those two events happened long after the property in question and the diversion was utilized.  They thought about challenging it but at that time determined not to and the decision hasn’t been revisited.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they are spending more money here and the taxpayers are still the ones being denied.  Mr. Rogers stated that if it was something she wanted him to do he would be glad to.  There was a consensus among the Village Council.  Ms. Mailander stated that with the consultant they only pay them when they use them.  Councilwoman Knudsen reiterated her sentiments, as if they were acting in good faith and this was pulled out of the blue for the Village to look into and determine if they should be considering other alternatives.

 

  1. Shared Services Agreement – Municipal Court Administrator and Deputy Municipal Court Administrator (Glen Rock)

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Village’s Municipal Court Administrator retired on August 1st.  The Administrative Office of the Courts in Hackensack is strongly encouraging Municipal Courts to create Shared Services Agreements with other Municipal Courts.  The Borough of Glen Rock’s Municipal Court Administrator, Kimberly McWilliams, is currently the Village’s Alternate Municipal Court Administrator.  The Borough of Glen Rock was approached about a Shared Services Agreement with the Village, whereby Glen Rock will provide a Municipal Court Administrator and Ridgewood will provide a Deputy Municipal Court Administrator and the use of our two clerical staff, as well as allow Glen Rock to use the Village’s video conferencing system to communicate with the jails and correctional facilities.  The Borough of Glen Rock has agreed to a Shared Services Agreement as outlined, for a fee of $50,000 a year.  It will allow each municipal court to remain in their respective municipalities.  The Deputy Court Administrator and the two staff may have to be at Glen Rock.  They are looking to start it September 1st.  This also needs an agreement and approval from the Assignment Judge of Bergen County.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that Shared Services are a great thing and the courts in Bergen County will ultimately be forced into sharing.  The Village is looking forward to doing this with Glen Rock.

 

  1. Shared Services Agreement – Floodplain Protection Planning Services (Bergen County)

 

Ms. Mailander stated that in May the Village Council authorized her to execute a Declaration of Interest Form in order to proceed with Floodplain Protection Planning Services.  The Bergen County Freeholders have adopted a resolution to authorize the Shared Services Agreement to have this plan developed through The Land Conservancy of New Jersey and The Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program for the Village, at no cost to the Village.

 

The Village Council now has to adopt a resolution to authorize the Shared Services Agreement, submit it to the County, and then The Land Conservancy of New Jersey and The Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program will be able to begin working on the plan.

 

  1. Ordinance to Amend Salary Ordinances for Supervisors, Non-Union, Blue Collar, and White Collar Employees

 

Ms. Mailander stated that these are either titles which they had not used before and are now setting salary ranges for them, or titles where they adjusted the salary ranges.  This is a clean-up ordinance.

 

  1. Policy

 

  1. Request to Amend Chapter 212 – Tennis Courts – Rules and Regulations

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the current rules and regulations will remain, which is that you have to have a permit tag to be displayed on request, you have an application, a registration, collecting fees.  She read through the rules and regulations that were now added. 

 

  1. Amending Chapter 190 Land Use Development – Illuminated Signs in Business District

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was sent to the Village Council by the Planning Board.  This does expire on December 31st, so she would like to get it adopted by the end of the year.  They can bring it back September 4th, but she would like to proceed with it at that time.  There was a consensus that the Village Council was willing to introduce it as proposed by the Planning Board.

 

  1. Flagpole Ordinance

 

Ms. Mailander stated that Mr. Rogers put together a memorandum of the issues that should be considered for the recently installed flagpole at Memorial Park at Van Neste Square.  Mr. Rogers stated that this was if the Village Council wanted to take action and regulate the use of the flagpole.  He added that there are recognized constitutional issues with regards to any flags that are placed on the flagpole that can’t be regulated with regard to content or what they are showing.  There are a number of things that can be discussed.  There is a weight limit on the flagpole, so the Village Council can think about the type of material of flag, the size of the flag to be displayed, the number of flags that can be permitted on this flagpole at any one time, the time period that the flag is going to be flown, and the duration.  Consideration has to be given for other flags or opportunities for other flags to be flown if there is a request.  They should consider setting up a system or a permit to be requested so that they can fill out the information and the specifications with regard to the flag.  He reviewed the memorandum and additional recommendations regarding permits and timeframes.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if someone comes in with Flag A and has to get a permit and there is a fee associated with the permit, who is hoisting the flag onto the flagpole.  Mr. Rogers stated that he believes that the Village would, but it could certainly be discussed and those are some of the things that can be built into the permit fee.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked what if there was a month when someone wanted their flag there for a month but a second, third, or fourth flag comes in then maybe if everyone has their permit in on time then maybe the month gets split.  Mr. Rogers stated that was one of the reasons you may not want to fly something for the whole month, but say two week intervals.  He had a conversation a few months ago with Mr. Rutishauser with regard to weight limits of the flagpole and what can be done.  Mayor Hache stated that the size and number would be determined by the specs of the flagpole.  Mr. Rogers pointed out that those were areas that you could regulate where safety trumps constitutional issues.

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that the type of flag is going to be the easy piece.  Getting the fee for the Village staff to put the flag up and review the application, she felt they should tailor similar to the trestle sign. Mr. Rogers stated that what they do with holiday displays is to advise people they can’t apply before a certain date or after a certain date.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that people would need time to get the flag, as well.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that if she has a flag that says Happy Birthday Mike because that is her free speech, you can do that.  The train trestle is reserved for non-profits, so there are rules assigned there, but in this instance they are saying anything goes.  Councilman Sedon stated that there would not be a challenge to the content unless someone put up something that was offensive.

 

Mr. Rogers stated that safety was the issue, so if there was a flag that would promote anarchy, or puts people in peril, or deals with issues of safety, then there is a possibility that you can regulate that.  He can certainly work up the wording that would cover that type of circumstance.  Other than that, Mike’s Birthday would be known by everyone.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked what type of flag would promote anarchy.  Mr. Rogers stated that the only thing that comes to mind was a flag that said kill everyone, which would be something that would be precluded from going up there.  Councilman Sedon asked if they could do anything about offensive language.  Mr. Rogers stated that free speech is designed to prevent people from being offensive, so you have to be careful when you’re talking about that.

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that in states where they flew the confederate flag, there must be change to their ordinances that could be reviewed to reflect that change.  So, maybe they should look into how it was worded.  Mr. Rogers agreed.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they put up the United States flag instead.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that someone found the Betsy Ross flag, and Mr. Rogers stated that was why you stay away from offensive in the wording. Councilman Sedon stated that he was at an event a number of years ago but someone was handing out stickers that said F Cancer, which is a positive message but it is packaged with an offensive word.  Mr. Rogers stated that in terms of regulating the wording, that aspect of it has been dealt with by the courts a number of times, and they give direction as to what you can and cannot do.

 

Councilman Sedon stated that on the permitting, he was thinking about the same thing that Councilwoman Walsh was about the train trestle sign and suggested Mr. Rogers look at that wording.  Mr. Rogers stated that they do have regulations with regard to the holiday displays and they need time to process the permit and make sure that you are going to be able to accommodate the request as best you can.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that if the pole can maintain two flags they should always have the second be the American Flag, because if two flags are approved you could have opposing positions and then you are missing the point.  Mr. Rogers stated that doesn’t take any type of precedent.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that the American Flag always has to be on top.  Councilwoman Walsh agreed.  Councilman Sedon stated that he would just say only one flag at a time.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that if it is going to be one flag, in the sense of equal opportunity, then you have to narrow your window of opportunity for that flag to fly because you might have overlap.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that it is just like the trestle with first come first served.  Mr. Rogers stated that the trestle is regulated by the space, whereas this isn’t regulated at all.  Ms. Mailander suggested they come up with some kind of proposed ordinance for the future and bring it back to the Village Council.  

 

  1. Green Team and REAC

 

Councilman Sedon stated that there is an obvious synergy between the Green Team and REAC, all they are doing for REAC is changing the name to Green Ridgewood.  After he pulled the Village Code, the biggest changes being made were changing all the names from REAC to Green Ridgewood and then removing language that designates an alternate and making everyone a member.  The Green Team originally was put together as a sub-committee for REAC, but they want to be recertified next year.  So, around January, the Green Team is going to split off from REAC and get the Village certified again for Sustainable Jersey.  The members checked with Sustainable Jersey, and they seemed fine with it.  These are minor changes to clean up these two ordinances and reflect what is going on right now with the committees.

 

Ms. Mailander asked if REAC was just changing its name to Green Ridgewood Committee, and then the Green Team is going to remain as is.  The only change to the ordinance is establishing it, so that anything that mentions it is going to say Green Ridgewood Committee, but they remain as two separate committees.  Councilman Sedon stated that they would remain as two separate committees because you don’t have to register every year with Sustainable Jersey. So, that way, it allows the Green Team to splinter off and focus on the application and then of course, if Green Ridgewood can support the Sustainable Jersey pieces of it.  Mayor Hache asked if designating the members from alternate to regular was just for Green Ridgewood.  Councilman Sedon stated that it was just Green Ridgewood members.  He added that it is just a rebrand for a green year with the plastic bag ban and Earth Day.  Ms. Mailander stated they would have these two ordinances with the changes made.  

 

  1. Operations

 

  1. 2020 Village Council Meeting Schedule

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this year there are a lot of different holidays that interfere with their regular meeting days.  The recommendation is to move each meeting forward in January, and in February they are moving those meetings forward one week, as well.  In April, the second Wednesday is the first night of Passover, and so they are recommending that those be moved forward one week.  July 1, is a Wednesday, so they are moving it forward one week.  In November, Veterans Day is Wednesday and so they are recommending that they move that one to a Monday because the following week is the League of Municipalities Conference.  All the other dates remain the same.  She also wanted to move the Coffee with the Council date to September 12, 2020.

 

  1. Approve Grant Application – New Jersey Department of Transportation

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is an annual Municipal Aid grant that the Village applies for and put in to received funds to resurface South Broad Street from East Ridgewood Avenue to the municipal line with Glen Rock.  Part of the grant application process is that they need a resolution to approve it and submit with the application.

 

  1. 2020 Municipal Aid Grant – Engineering Division

 

  1. Major Soil Permit – Hudson Street Parking Lot

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Engineering Division’s conditions for the major soil moving permit were discussed at the Planning Board last night.  They have been incorporated into the resolution and trucking routes will be carefully coordinated with the Village’s Police Department.  They received a letter from the Planning Board that they did discuss this last night and recommended that the governing body issue the major soil moving permit.

  1. Resident Survey

 

Ms. Mailander stated that during the budget discussions, she mentioned that the Borough of Fair Lawn had conducted a resident survey several years ago, to determine what was and was not important to residents.  They then used this information to determine priorities for budgeting.  She suggested sending it out in September and then getting it back in late October.  She reviewed the questions that Fair Lawn asked, and what the Village could possibly ask.

 

Mayor Hache stated that when you are asking questions it is important to have the context so if you ask someone how do you feel about rear yard pickup, and would they love it if they knew what the savings could be.  He added it was important to have the context of the numbers behind it.  He asked how this survey was distributed.  Ms. Mailander stated that they mailed it, but it could certainly be distributed.  Mayor Hache suggested including a unique number so they could assure there were no duplicates.  Ms. Mailander stated that they did not accept anonymous surveys, and one survey per household.  She also suggested doing it similar to how it was done with the Master Plan. 

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that if you don’t allow anonymous you aren’t allowing a filter for the information; a lot of people feel very uncomfortable completing a survey and putting their name on it, especially if they are senior citizens.  Ms. Mailander added that she would talk to Bob Rooney to see if he had any related budget questions that maybe they could charge for, or get an idea of whether people value that service.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that it is important that this is a very small piece of the municipal tax dollars, as they need to recalculate those percentages because the BOE budget has gone up significantly at a greater pace than the Village’s municipal budget.

 

  1. FEMA Flood Map Inclusions

 

Ms. Mailander stated that there are new flood maps that are going to be effective on August 28, 2019 and they have a significant incongruity or error in them.  The area of concern is along the Ho-Ho-Kus Brook, from First Street southward on either side of North Maple Avenue to the brook itself.  It looks like approximately 33 additional properties will be in the flood plain.  Engineering has checked the elevation of the newly included properties and feels there is a significant error being created by the FEMA/FIRM maps.  There are some property owners who may be considering a legal challenge to this to have the mapping corrected.  Therefore, the Village Engineer has indicated that perhaps the Village may be interested in joining the residents to have the mapping corrected due to the number of effected properties, subject to Mr. Roger’s legal opinion.

 

Mr. Rogers stated that he hasn’t had a chance to talk to Mr. Rutishauser about it yet, but he thinks the Village’s position would be much different than the individual property owners.  There is certainly a mechanism out there for a municipality to challenge any type of error and see if they can define the error and what may happen.  He suggested they support the best they can but don’t join or become a party to any lawsuit that is started by a property owner.  The Village should try to deal with this administratively with FEMA to correct whatever error is there, so that they are doing their part to try to help the residents.

 

  1. REVIEW OF AUGUST 14, 2019 PUBLIC MEETING AGENDA

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was a review of the August 14, 2019 Public Meeting Agenda.

 

Proclamations: Commemorate 100th Anniversary of Ridgewood’s American Legion Post 53 and Honor Its Mission as a Patriotic Veterans Organization Devoted to Mutual Helpfulness; Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over 2019 Statewide Crackdown; Declare September Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month; and Declare September National Preparedness Month.

 

There are no ordinances for introduction or public hearing for Ridgewood Water.

 

Resolutions for Ridgewood Water include: Award Contract Under Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing Contract – 2020 Ford Escape; Award Contract Under North Jersey Wastewater Cooperative Purchasing Contract – Installation and Replacement of Pumps and Motors; and Award Contract Under North Jersey Wastewater Cooperative Purchasing Contract – Installation and Replacement of Pumps and Motors.

 

The following ordinances are scheduled for introduction: 3729 – Bond Ordinance – Acquisition of Vehicles for Parking Utility; 3732 – Bond Ordinance – Acquisition of Vehicles – Parks Department and Traffic & Signal Department; 3733 – Bond Ordinance – Reappropriating Funds for Scarab Windrow Turner; 3734 – Establish Loading Zone at Train Station Parking Lot; 3735 – Establish Reserved Parking Spaces at Train Station Parking Lot – NJ Transit and Concession Stand/Social Services; 3736 – Amend Chapter 265 – Vehicles and Traffic – Time Limit Parking on Monte Vista, Park Slope, Madison Place and North Hillside Avenue; 3737 – Amend Fire Prevention Inspection Fees; 3738 – Amend Various Salary Ordinances; and 3739 – Amend Chapter 212 – Tennis Courts – Rules and Regulations.

 

The scheduled public hearings include: 3728 – Designate Parking Spaces in Train Station Lot for Hudson Street Lot Permit Holders; 3730 – Amend Chapter 190 – Land Use and Development – Swimming Pools; and 3731 – Amend Chapter 190 – Land Use and Development – Permit Real Estate Open House Signs.

 

Resolutions include: Title 59 Approval – Leaf Collection Services; Award Contract – Leaf Collection Services; Award Contract Under State Contract – Carpeting for Various Offices in Village Hall; Award Contract Under State Contract – 2 Chevrolet Tahoes – Police Department; Award Contract Under State Contract – Mobile Radios for Police Vehicles; Award Contract Under State Contract – Furnishing and Delivering Patrol Equipment for Police Vehicles; Award Contract Under State Contract – Panasonic Tough Books – Police Department; Award Contract Under State Contract – Server Upgrade; Award Contract Under State Contract – Printer Upgrades and Replacements; Award Contract Under State Contract – Ruggedized Network Switches; Award Contract Under State Contract – Aruba Switches and Network Upgrades; Award Contract Under State Contract – Wi-Fi Access Points; Award Contract Under State Contract – Renewal of Spatial Data Logic Software; Award Professional Services Contract – Professional Planning Consultant – Green Acres Diversion; Authorize Change Order – Train Station Parking Expansion; Authorize Change Order – Resurfacing Glen Tennis Court; Authorize Shared Services Agreement – Municipal Court Administrator and Deputy Municipal Court Administrator (Glen Rock); Authorize Shared Services Agreement – Floodplain Protection Planning Services (Bergen County); Approve Submission of NJDOT Grant Application and Authorize Execution of Grant Agreement – South Broad Street Resurfacing; Authorize Major Soil Moving Permit – Hudson Street Parking Lot; Declare Property Surplus – Police Department Vehicles; Declare Property Surplus – Streets Department Paving Box; and Cancel General Capital Ordinance Balances.

 

  1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

 

Boyd Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that he was listening with some interest to the discussion about the two parking spaces that are in front of Westside Bagels, and the first thing that came to his mind was how did two parking spaces get installed at that location and nobody knows about it as it was all done unofficially.  He wondered how many other parking spaces are there in the Village that are unlawful and were not created by ordinance.  He asked if this was a process that the Village Council was going to undertake now to ensure that there were no other rogue parking spaces.  He asked how many summonses that were issued for people who parked there, as those have to be invalid.  As the spaces aren’t legit, how could you issue a summons to someone.  Mr. Loving stated that people are putting money in the meters but the spaces aren’t authorized, and he asked if they could continue to collect revenue for spaces that aren’t on the books. He understands that the businesses don’t want those spaces removed but they are unlawful.  He reiterated his sentiments and added that it seems like a big mess to him and he is concerned that there didn’t seem to be any urgency in their voices that this needs to be fixed right away and he suggested talking with Mr. Rogers regarding any summonses that had been issued regarding those two spots.

 

There were no additional comments from the public.

 

Mayor Hache stated that Mr. Loving raised some interesting and important questions.  Mr. Rogers stated that he found out about the lack of enacting an ordinance yesterday or today from Susan and she asked the same questions.  He doesn’t know that there is a need for urgency regarding tonight’s discussion but the steps have been taken to make sure that enforcement on those gets directed in the proper way.  If someone wants to challenge the issuance of a summons they can do that.  The aspect of how long it has been there and as far as he remembers those spaces have been striped there.  There may be others in the ordinances, but the Manager’s office is prepared to handle those things.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen added that all this predates the current Village Council and was uncovered by chance.  Mayor Hache stated that they can use the inventory of the meters and compare it to established ordinances.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. RESOLUTION TO GO INTO CLOSED SESSION

 

Deputy Village Clerk, Donna Jackson read Resolution #19-252 to go into Closed Session as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. ADJOURNMENT

 

There being no further business to come before the Village Council, on a motion by Councilman Sedon, seconded by Councilwoman Knudsen, and carried unanimously by voice vote, the Village Council’s Work Session was adjourned at 10:44 P.M.

 

 

 

 

______________________________

                                                                                                      Ramon M. Hache, Sr.                              

                                                                                                                        Mayor                          

 

______________________________

              Donna M. Jackson

           Deputy Village ClerkA REGULAR WORK SESSION OF THE VILLAGE COUNCIL OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD HELD IN THE SYDNEY V. STOLDT, JR. COURT ROOM OF THE RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE HALL, 131 NORTH MAPLE AVENUE, RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY ON AUGUST 7, 2019 AT 7:30 P.M.

 

  1. CALL TO ORDER – OPEN PUBLIC MEETINGS ACT – ROLL CALL – FLAG     SALUTE

 

Mayor Hache called the meeting to order at 7:30 P.M. and read the Statement of Compliance with the Open Public Meetings Act.  At roll call the following were present: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Walsh, and Mayor Hache.  Also present were Heather Mailander, Village Manager/Village Clerk; Donna Jackson, Deputy Village Clerk; and Matthew Rogers, Village Attorney. Councilman Voigt was absent.

 

Mayor Hache led those in attendance in the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag as well as in a Moment of Silence to honor the brave men and women serving in our armed forces and all our first responders, as well as Judy Caruso, beloved nurse at Travell School for over 20 years who passed away recently.

 

  1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

 

Ronald A. Rozenweig, Woodfield Realty, 4 Wilsey Square, stated he was here tonight because there was something on the agenda which he believes has been removed, which was for the Village to remove two of the four 15 minute parking spaces on the eastbound side of West Ridgewood Avenue.  He was at the meeting on behalf of his tenants who are greatly concerned about the impact this would have on the viability of their businesses.  Five of the tenants are concerned because they have small businesses which rely on in and out businesses, such as Puzo’s Pizza, Davis Surgical Supply, The Wine Seller, West Side Bagel, and Pazzazed.  They are all concerned about the loss of business and the viability of their businesses with the loss of those parking spaces.  Mr. Rozenweig added that the right hand turn lane is rarely used anyway, and most people coming to that intersection are taking a left to come into town, so removing those two parking spaces makes no sense.  There are other solutions which are easily available and would leave those four parking spaces which are the only four parking spaces on that whole block and are the ones that those businesses rely on. 

 

Lee Warren, 140 Washington Place, stated that she came home from vacation to come to this meeting because she was made aware of the taking away of parking on West Ridgewood Avenue.  She wants to be sure the Village was aware of how much these businesses that surround these parking spots give back to our community.  They support Lax Day, Ridgewood Jamboree, baseball events, Graydon swim team, Ridgewood High School swim team, and other events.  She asked if the reason they were going to take away two fifteen minute spaces was because someone in Ridgewood was impatient and wants to make a right, but can’t.  Ms. Warren added that it was absurd, and she was worried about the businesses as well as the children who cross at these intersections to go into town.  She suggested that with the right on red, which is the right of way for the cross walk people; it might be more dangerous for those walking across the street.

 

Ms. Warren stated that between 9 and 11 there were 19 people who used those parking spots, no one longer than seven minutes, on the most deserted week in Ridgewood.  This is a very busy parking area and we cannot afford to take those spots away from the townspeople and the businesses that are trying to stay afloat.  She also asked if the bike lane was disappearing.

 

Tom Shanley, proprietor of The Wine Seller, 6 West Ridgewood Avenue, stated that he has been in this store for five years and sees this intersection every day.  The last thing that the Village Council needs to do is to increase speeds in that area.  He has seen cars hitting cars, cars hitting school buses, and knocking down lampposts.  The lights that were put on the bicycle rack got knocked over twice.  If anything, something needs to be done to make it safer.  People who park across the street are going to be crossing West Ridgewood Avenue with the light red, and there will now be a third lane of traffic zipping through to make the right on red.  Mr. Shanley said that within a year they would have a big serious injury there, not to mention that during the school year between 3:00 P.M. and 4:00 P.M. that sidewalk is full of kids horsing around.  Now, there are going to be cars flying down hugging that curb while the kids are playing around.  He asked the Village Council why it was dropped from the agenda this evening.

 

Mark Berchardi, Westside Bagels, 2 Wilsey Square, stated that he has owned Westside Bagels for eleven years and those parking spots are the lifeblood of his business.  The average customer that comes into his store spends less than ten minutes in the store.  They park there and some park across the street, but most don’t because they have to wait to cross at the light.  Taking away two of those spots at any time of the day will significantly impact his business.  He stated that the last thing this Village can afford is to have any open real estate in the downtown area.  Between 3:00 P.M. and 4:00 P.M. during the school year is one of the busiest parts of his day.  He has kids from GW who walk to his store every day to get a snack after school. Also, to increase the traffic flow in that area is very dangerous.  Mr. Berchardi asked that the Village Council consider the comments that have been put before them tonight.  He added that he has signatures of 75 customers who have signed a petition asking the Village not to remove those parking spots.

 

Jenny Shanley, The Wine Seller, 6 West Ridgewood Avenue, stated that she is a logical person and this just isn’t logical to her.  She asked if the Village Council took an aerial view of what that intersection looks like, as it doesn’t make sense to her that taking away those two spots would actually alleviate what the Village is trying to do.  She thinks they would have to take all four spots away to make it work.  She added that it is West Ridgewood Avenue, not Route 17, and asked if this was something that they were going to do throughout Ridgewood.  Across the street at the train station they took down trees, grass, and green area to create more parking spots which is an ongoing battle in Ridgewood.  Pedestrian safety is going to be the biggest issue of all, as they would like to keep the kids, pedestrians, and visitors who come to town spend their money here, safely.

 

Phil Dolce, 625 Kingsbridge Lane, stated that on behalf of the residents on the East side of the Village, he wanted to thank the Village Council for not turning the Schedler property into a 90 foot baseball field with lights, refreshment stands and overwhelming traffic.  He thanked the Village Council for planting trees along the historic Saddle River Road and Route 17.  Mr. Dolce thanked the Village Council for recognizing the historic value of the Schedler House.  The house already is listed on the Village Master Plan as an historic home and is eligible for National and State listing for its historic value.  As soon as an archaeological evaluation is finished he is sure it will be on National and State registers.  This historic Schedler House is in disrepair, but only because of eight years of neglect by the previous Village Manager and the previous Council majority.  The house was livable when it was purchased originally.  Local neighbors on the east side have already spent $10,000 of their own money since 2009 to prevent the house from further ruin by putting on tarps and are prepared to put up even more money to aid in the restoration or use of the house.  This is their dedication as it is important. 

 

Mr. Dolce thanked the Village Council for understanding the significant negative effects that closing the Glen School had on residents of the east side.  Closing that school was absolutely devastating, not only because it affected property values and students, but it injured the sense of community that only a school gives to a local area.  Therefore, the Schedler House and the property are the only way of restoring the sense of community in that area.  Finally, he thanked the Village Council for realizing that the residents of the east side are not second class citizens, but tax paying residents that deserve equal treatment with the rest of the Village.  There are 568 homes that pay over $9 million in taxes, but they do not have the facilities that are given to the middle of town.

 

Kathryn Schmidt, 123 South Irving Street, stated that she wanted to continue some of the themes here.  She is a huge fan of 15 minute parking spaces as the convenience of running in and out is really important.  She added that she is very supportive of increasing parking as much as they can and she echoed the sentiments of others asking why the Village Council would remove these spaces.  This is not Route 17 or the Thruway, so she hoped that they could preserve those parking spaces.

 

Ms. Schmidt added that she is very supportive of Schedler, but when she saw the price tag she was shocked.  She asked that they make sure that there is a good roof over the top of it before they spend all of this money, but she thinks they are going in the right direction.  She added that she would like to see the topic of Air Babb come up again, as she thinks there is a way that it can be done without bothering neighbors.  Finally, she gets a lot of her information about what is going on by reading the blogs and Facebook pages, and that it has become so obvious that what you say matters and she continues to be amazed at the language that is being used.  At the end of the day it is not helping to bring our community together, which is not the way we should be acting.  She added that she hopes that on all levels they can tone down the rhetoric.

 

Anne Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that she would like to know if it would be possible in the week or so after Graydon closes before the water is drained, if there could be a dog day at Graydon.  She added that she thinks it would be wonderful as the parks were recently opened to dogs, and perhaps an exception could be made of a one day event at Graydon.  It is her recollection that in the week or so after Graydon closes, there is a Village employee party at Graydon, so obviously it would not be that day.  Ms. Loving added that she wasn’t sure if she should ask Ms. Bigos or the Village Manager, but she thinks it would be a nice thing and she would like to put that request in.

 

There were no additional comments from the public.

 

Mayor Hache stated that he wanted to answer some of the questions and clarify the doubts.  There were some questions as to why the issue came up and why it was removed.  He would like to remind everyone that just because they discuss something, they are not deciding for or against something.  The item was pulled from the agenda at the last meeting because they had looked at some of the language because it was ambiguous.  Those two spots don’t actually exist and were never voted on by the Village Council.  He asked that it be removed from this agenda, as having it during the summer when there is the lowest amount of traffic going through that intersection would be a disservice.  He wanted to get input from the businesses and residents about that intersection.  Standing on that corner today would give a very different picture than what he would see in September.

 

Mayor Hache stated that the dog day at Graydon is a neat idea and he would imagine it would involve suspending of their ordinance.  Ms. Mailander stated that it would.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the issue of the two parking spaces was removed from the agenda because the Village Council can’t hold a public hearing to remove two parking spaces either way because the spots legally don’t exist.  If there is no ordinance that created those parking spaces they can’t rescind it because it just is not there.  The beauty of this process is that the businesses were all notified and have opportunity to come here this evening and voice their concerns.  They will have to go back now and revisit the spaces and go through a process to introduce those two parking spaces as an ordinance and then hold a public hearing for or against adopting that ordinance.  They have to go back to square one and create those spaces.  This is something that obviously they have to revisit and this Village Council is one of the most businesses friendly Village Council’s that she has seen in a very long time.

 

Mayor Hache stated that they can’t meet to remove something that doesn’t exist, but they would have to formally meet to have those spaces exist legally.  There is no ordinance to establish them, so they can’t rescind them, but they would have to create an ordinance to have them established legally.

 

  1. MANAGERS REPORT

 

Village Council Public Meeting – Ms. Mailander stated that the next Village Council Public Meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, August 14th at 8:00 P.M.  The next meeting after that will be the September 4th Work Session at 7:30 P.M.

 

Hudson Street Parking Lot – Ms. Mailander stated that she wanted to be sure that residents know that the Hudson Street Parking Lot will be closing on Monday, August 19th due to the construction of the new parking deck.  There have been signs up since last week in the parking lot but they are trying to spread the word as much as they can.  A groundbreaking ceremony for the parking garage will take place on September 7th at 9:00 A.M. and everyone is invited to attend.

 

Ash Trees – Ms. Mailander stated that several Ash trees on the Dayton Street side of Memorial Park at Van Neste Square have been examined and evaluated and have been found to be in decline.  For public safety reasons these trees are scheduled to be removed next week, weather permitting.

 

Note Sale – Ms. Mailander stated that yesterday there was a note sale and they sold $32,727,000 of notes, consisting of $15,197,000 bond anticipation notes, $17,000,000 Water Utility bond anticipation notes, and $530,000 Parking Utility bond anticipation notes.  This sale generated money for new projects of approximately $5,700,000 of general capital, and $6,860,000 of Water Utility capital.  The balance of the funds is used to roll over existing notes.  There were four bidders, TD Securities, Bank of New York, Oppenheimer and Company, and Jeffries.  TD Securities was the successful bidder by a very narrow margin with an annual interest rate of 1.75% and a variable interest cost of 1.309%.  This is the lowest net interest cost for short term borrowing our bond council has seen this year.  Bob Rooney will be working with Acacia to determine the amount and timing of future long and short term borrowing.

 

Bergen Bites Back! – Ms. Mailander stated that especially after heavy rains, please clean drains and gutters. Keep swimming pools adequately treated and please remove standing water.  It only takes seven days for mosquitos to grow and your efforts make a difference for everyone.

 

Healthbarn – Ms. Mailander stated that Healthbarn just completed its annual inspection by the New Jersey Department of Health Consumer, Environmental and Occupational Health Service and continues to be accredited by National Nutrition Education Standards and by adhering to National Safety Standards. 

 

Children’s Sensory and Butterfly Garden – Ms. Mailander stated that the Children’s Sensory and Butterfly Garden behind The Stable is currently in full bloom, and she encouraged people to come and visit.

 

“The Great Swamp: NJ’s Natural Heritage” – Ms. Mailander stated that this is a lecture by NJ photojournalist Jim Del Giudice and will take place Monday, August 12th in the Anne Zusy Youth Lounge from 10:00 A.M. to 11:30 A.M.  The history of the 7,000 acres that comprise the great swamp has been integral to the Passaic Valley Watershed.  Admission is $5 and registration is required.

 

Graydon Pool – Ms. Mailander reminded everyone that Graydon Pool is open daily from 10:00 A.M. to 7:30 P.M.  Late season hours begin on August 12th, weekday hours will be noon to 7:30 P.M. and weekdays/holidays 10:00 A.M. to 7:30 P.M.

 

Art Exhibit at The Stable – Ms. Mailander stated that the art exhibit entitled “Inside Small Works” there will be an artist reception on August 8th from 7:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.

 

Kasschau Memorial Shell – Ms. Mailander stated that tomorrow’s performance at the Kasschau Memorial Shell located on Veterans Field behind the Library, will be the last performance of the season, and the programs begins at 8:30 P.M.

 

Camps for Village Youth – Ms. Mailander stated that for the remainder of the summer there will be a wide variety of camps available for Village youth.  Skateboarding, golf, pony share, summer STEM, and lacrosse.

 

Ridgewood Guild – Ms. Mailander stated that the Ridgewood Guild provides free Movies under the Stars on Wednesday nights.  This evening was supposed to be The Sixth Sense, but due to the rain it was postponed until tomorrow night.  If it rains tomorrow night it will be screened on Wednesday August 14th.  The film will begin at approximately 8:30 P.M.  There is one additional movie, ET, on August 21st.  Bring a chair or a blanket and enjoy the show.

 

Chamber of Commerce Annual Car Show – Ms. Mailander stated that the Chamber of Commerce Annual Car Show will be around Memorial Park at Van Neste Square on Friday, September 6th from 6:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.  There is no rain date, and trophies are at 8:30 P.M.

 

Farmers Market – Ms. Mailander stated that the Farmers Market is open every Sunday through October 27th on the West Side of the Train Station from 9:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M.  She encouraged people to come and meet the farmers.  The Ridgewood Farmers Market is a real farmers market and is brought to us by the members of the Ridgewood Chamber of Commerce.

 

Bergen County Utilities Authority – Ms. Mailander stated that there is a free recycling event on Saturday, August 17th from 9:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. at Bergen Community College.  They will collect old tires, computers, and electronics.  And there is a mobile paper shredding truck that will be there.  This event is rain or shine and requires proof of residency.

 

Mayors Wellness Festival – Ms. Mailander stated that the Mayor’s Wellness Festival is slated for Sunday, September 22nd from 11:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. in Memorial Park at Van Neste Square.  All local health, medical, fitness and wellness providers are invited to participate.  This year there will be a healthy food court and a picnic area.

 

  1. COUNCIL REPORTS

 

Historic Preservation Commission – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Historic Preservation Commission is canceled for tomorrow evening.

 

Planning Board – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Planning Board met last night and went over their new by-laws that should be adopted two meetings from now.  Mayor Hache added that they swore in Allison Wesner as the new Class 4 member of the Planning Board last night.

 

Master Plan Advisory Board Meeting – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they met last night and Neil Desai of NV5 reviewed the results of the Visioning Process with the committee.  They had invited some members of the public to join them, and it was interesting that it came up in the visioning results of the survey that many folks are uncomfortable with the rhetoric on social media as it relates to Ridgewood topics and they feel that it can be taken down a few notches.  They also had the opportunity to hear from the new planner and they were concerned about historic preservation throughout the Village and the Schedler House.  The planner gave them a road map for both private and public property as to how they can do a better job preserving historic structures throughout the Village and those that many feel give the charming character and history to the Village.

 

Car Show – Councilwoman Walsh added that if anyone had vehicles that they think would be worthy of the show you can get an application with the Chamber of Commerce on their website.

 

Hudson Street Parking Garage – Mayor Hache stated that the Village Manager, Village Engineer, Deputy Mayor, and himself took a drive out to Denver, Pennsylvania last week to visit the company that is preparing the precast concrete for the Hudson Street Parking structure and had a tour of the facility and saw the quality of the construction of the pieces that will be assembled here.  They have officially signed off on the materials and the colors that they will use and they are moving forward.  The groundbreaking is September 7th but the lot actually goes under construction August 19th

 

Councilwoman Knudsen added that CFO, Bob Rooney, joined them on the visit to Hyde Concrete and they had an opportunity to view an augmented reality version of our structure through a holo- lens and see the garage in a lot of dimensions.  They will receive a copy of that video and will get as much of that information online as possible.  There is a lot of video and pictures of how they pour and create the concrete pieces.

 

Mayor Hache stated that for the groundbreaking ceremony on September 7th, Table at Latonas has generously offered to provide coffee and continental breakfast of everyone afterwards.

 

Central Business District Advisory Committee – Mayor Hache stated that CBDAC is meeting tomorrow.

 

125th Anniversary – Mayor Hache stated that the 125th Anniversary Committee met this week and were celebrating the fact that they were moving forward with the Ridgewood Community Foundation which is a 501(c)3 organization that will help to promote a lot of activities in town and will help fund the activities of the boards and committees.  This is a good opportunity for those committees to raise money.  The 125th Anniversary Gala will take place on November 2nd at Events by Felina, which should be opening in October.

 

  1. DISCUSSION

 

  1. Budget

 

  1. Schedler House Rehabilitation

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they went out for bids which were higher than the amount they had appropriated.  These are prequalified bidders because it is an historic structure.  It was rebid on August 1st and the Village received three bids.  They bid package requested bids for three items and using the aggregate, Dell-Tech of Trenton was the lowest bidder at $1,126,250.  The Village currently doesn’t have that total amount available; however, there are options as to how they would like to award this because it was bid as A, B, and C.

 

Tom Connolly, Principal Architect of Connolly and Hickey Historical Architects, stated that they are the firm that prepared the contract documents for the interior and exterior restoration of the Zabriskie-Schedler House, and prepared some of the historical reports which enabled some of the grants that the Village received from Bergen County.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they have a fiduciary obligation to taxpayer dollars, but also are stewards of our resources and our historic grounds and structures.  So, they want to make sure they get this right and she was interested in understanding his perspective of how the price tag went from $7-800,000 to the $1.1 million.  Mr. Connolly stated that their estimates were completed in 2016 and before any contract documents were prepared.  So, maybe they didn’t understand the full scope of the work.  A larger part of the issue is the economy.  He received a letter from another contractor that it is a super-hot economy; costs have skyrocketed; and everybody is busy.  The last time they did see something like this was in 2005 or 2006, when estimates for this type of work meant nothing.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if the prequalification process affects this.  Mr. Connolly stated that their pool of contractors that they can pull from for restoration has to comply with the Secretary of the Interior Standards for Rehabilitation of Historic Properties.  It says they have to guide the restoration process.  There are a few qualified contractors in the State that can perform this work.  New contractors get qualified in the State, but it is a process.

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that typically when you see estimates, you see general requirements.  What is glaring on these three is that one person has $106,000 and the next bid is $10,000.  She is trying to determine what the Dell-Tech bids are.  Mr. Connolly stated that it is unfortunate that they have to break things down this way, but they know the contractors and how they put bids together.  Looking at the bottom line, they are generally close to where they are. When they put the bid together, they put money all over the place.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that the challenge they see all the time is Change Orders.  She wondered if the low bidder would request a Change Order to bring a low estimate up to the correct amount.  Mr. Connolly stated that they go through these bids line by line and understand what these contractors include and felt that Dell-Tech’s bid was right on.  Councilwoman Walsh reiterated that the last thing they want are Change Orders.  Mr. Connolly stated that they typically allow for unforeseen conditions in restoration work of about 10% to 15%, but they are already over that right off the bat.

 

Councilwoman Walsh asked if their bid would then correlate with the descriptions.  So, if they look at the price for finishes, it will be defined that they can’t come back and describe something else.  Mr. Connolly stated that they are required to do what is in the contract documents, and there is no way he will allow them to not complete something if it is in black and white.  Unforeseen conditions exist, but they have unit prices in the project for things such as that.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that was her biggest concern because they were so variant.  Mr. Connolly stated that they get this question a lot and it is unfortunate that they have to break it down this way, but they put their money in different locations in the breakdown. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh asked if they could sign a guaranteed price with the contractors as they did with the parking garage.  Mayor Hache stated that it was a guaranteed maximum price, and then they work out a split between the difference of the GMP and the cost.  Mr. Connolly stated that whatever ends up on the contract document or the specifications is what you receive.  Even if there are unforeseen items or the architects miss, you receive what is on the contract documents.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she would like to see what that list is.  Mr. Connolly stated that they have that.  There is a schedule on the drawings.  Councilwoman Walsh asked if they were agreeing with their price for that.  Mr. Connolly agreed with that.

 

Councilman Sedon stated that it is sectioned off in project A, B, and C, and asked if Mr. Connolly could explain what that entails.  Mr. Connolly stated that they broke it up to get the project underway and to use some of the grant money they have.  They are hoping that the Village can get another grant in the future and most likely they would.  Historically once you start down the process of receiving grants, the granting agency likes to see the project through.  The goal is to get the building envelope project underway with A; B is the restrooms; and C is the finishes.  Councilman Sedon stated that finishes appear in project A, B, and C and when adding up all the work it, comes out pretty similar for all of the contractors.  There was some discussion on finishes, and Mr. Connolly stated that he wouldn’t try to dissect it that much but he knows how much these things cost.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they were just to move full steam ahead, how long would Mr. Connolly estimate this might take.  Mr. Connolly stated that it is going to take a year, maybe a little less depending on the contractor.  They just completed a full interior restoration in Clifton and it took a full year.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked how long it would take to do the exterior building envelope.  Mr. Connolly stated that it would take less than six months.  Councilwoman Knudsen cited what Dr. Dolce said during his public comment.  She added that the residents on the east side of town have been living with the house in this condition for more than a decade and it is fundamentally unfair to our fellow residents who live in that neighborhood.  She added that it is important that they get this moved forward and can see at least a polished exterior so that the neighbors have a sense of comfort that the neighborhood is what it should be.

 

Mayor Hache thanked Mr. Connolly for coming tonight and added that he has been a supporter of the Schedler property and house.  His concern here is that when they looked at the original estimate, they were looking at something in the neighborhood of project B and they were now 60% to 80% higher than the original estimate.  In the course of time, they are acting and basing their decisions on certain assumptions.  Ms. Mailander stated they have the original estimates and she would share that with the Village Council after Mayor Hache completed his comments.  Mayor Hache stated that his concern is that to begin the project they are 60% to 80% higher and haven’t put one shovel in the ground and as they know now, it always costs more than the estimate.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the original estimate was broken into two phases and then with the asbestos the total project was estimated to $784,800.  They currently have applied for three rounds of grants through Bergen County Historic Preservation.  Phase 1 was the roof stabilization and planning documents.  The grant amount was $116,724 which is a 50/50 matching grant.  Phase 2A was exterior stabilization and interior rehabilitation and that was a total cost of $400,000 so it was $200,000 for each of the grant and the Village.  Phase 2B was the interior rehabilitation which was estimated at $151,300 so that was $75,650 for the grant and the Village each.  It is a total of $392,375 from the Village and from the grants which equals the $784,750.  Ms. Mailander stated that as Mr. Connolly stated, part of the reason that it has increased so dramatically is that they are busy.  The material costs have gone up between 8% and 40% not concluding the tariffs that have effecting lighting and HVAC.  Material costs keep changing; contractors are building in larger buffers in their budget due to prevailing wage as well.  The minimum wage is going up and that affects prevailing wage which the Village is required to pay.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they can apply for more grants next year, and so they currently have enough money to do A and C which is exterior and ADA improvements, or they can do A or C, and then go out for additional grants next year for the interior of the house.  This is up to the Village Council.  Mayor Hache stated that looking at the 25% tariff and the increases on minimum wage; he still doesn’t understand the increase 60% to 80% above the original estimate.  He thinks they are padding their numbers and better sharpen their pencils.  Mr. Connolly stated that they rebid the project and re-did the scope and the cost of the project didn’t come down that much.  Their estimates were done prior to doing the contract documents and his partner who does the estimates is a certified cost estimator with the State of NJ.  She is typically very good at putting estimates together for restoration, but they found in this economy, it is one of four projects that they have in the same predicament.

 

Councilman Sedon asked if there was anything that Mr. Connolly would see going through that would greatly increase the cost.  Mr. Connolly stated that the greatest thing was the asbestos, adding that it was not unusual for projects of this type to have change orders but if they do, they are usually minor in the $100s or just a thousand dollars and are for minor things.  They are doing all the structure, which is part of the project; the barrier free component is in there.  Light safety and electrical are on there, but he can’t see through walls.  They assumed a few things for the structure.  Mayor Hache asked what percentage of the project cost is labor.  Mr. Connolly said that he couldn’t tell off the top of his head, but he could get that for the Village Council.  He added that would it be in the general requirements number and probably percentage wise.  They do have a contingency for each phase, so the project could come in less than 1% if all goes well.  Mr. Connolly stated that it was approximately 13% if he took their general requirements and he doesn’t know what else they have in there that could be scaffolding and other things.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they were to award project A and project C and move forward, could they actually go out and rebid project B.  Mr. Connolly stated of course.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that if they started to do the exterior work and they get that started. Then the biggest hit is on that project B anyway, so they could back out and rebid that.  It is quite possible that there is a change in that pool of available prequalified contractors to choose from and it is also possible that economic conditions will change somewhat.  They will have to roll the dice that it doesn’t actually come back higher, which is one of the options that is available, as well.  Mr. Connolly stated that would narrow it and he would recommend rebidding project B and narrowing the scope.  With project B you are focused on just the interior.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that at this point they have a resolution to award if the Village Council would like to, but they could also put it off until September.  There was a consensus between Councilwoman Knudsen and Councilman Sedon that they were ready to move forward with project A and C.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she felt like she wanted to go back and take a look as she doesn’t remember seeing a line item for all of the items, and asked when they received that.  Ms. Mailander stated that she didn’t know if they ever got it.  Mr. Connolly stated that there is no actual breakdown of the contract documents which are architectural plans and you are getting what’s on those drawings.  Councilwoman Walsh asked if they could get this on the next agenda.  Ms. Mailander stated that would be September 4th.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she wanted to review all of the data a little bit more. 

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the problem she now sees is that they will have not awarded the contract which is an issue of timing because they want to get a roof on the building finally, after years of tarps at the expense of the generosity of our residents.  She asked if it was an issue of timing if the contract isn’t awarded and they wait until September.  Mr. Connolly stated that since they first started drafting the documents until now, the deterioration of the building has accelerated and it will continue to do so.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that this is an issue of the neighborhood and community and she would like to move forward at this point.  Mayor Hache stated that the concern is how they got from $700,000 to $1.2 million.  His fear is that they start digging and they find more problems that add to the cost.  He added that he was willing to commit to a guaranteed maximum price.  Mr. Connolly stated that was what the contractor was doing by signing the contract as they are obligated to do what’s on the contract documents, which is the restoration of the house.  Mayor Hache asked what the profit margin is of the project.  Mr. Connolly stated that he didn’t know.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they could discuss it again on September 4th and in the meantime they could have a Special Public Meeting that evening.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they could wait until September, but that wasn’t changing the price.  Mr. Connolly stated that they were obligated to hold their price for X amount of days.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that whether they do this at this point or September, the price isn’t changing.  So, the only thing at question is whether or not they are willing to spend this money for this historic preservation.  As Dr. Dolce pointed out, the community has nothing since the Glen School closed, but the price point doesn’t change until September, they are going to lose another month before getting this project moving, the deterioration is accelerating, and she doesn’t see the price changing. 

 

Mayor Hache stated that it isn’t a matter of price but where is the funding as they were working under particular assumptions.  Mr. Connolly stated that it wasn’t unusual for this to happen.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the funding is in place for A and C.  Mayor Hache stated that they were funding for a particular estimated cost, and that means that now the funding falls short of the cost of the project. So, how does that gap get filled.  Ms. Mailander stated that they could go for grants again next year and can bond.  Mr. Connolly stated that historically, once you start down the path with grants and are awarded grants they tend to see the project through and this is not uncommon for the cost to increase as you move forward with a restoration.  Mayor Hache stated that he agreed with Councilwoman Walsh and wanted to look at this further. 

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked when the next public meeting is.  Ms. Mailander stated that it was Wednesday.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they could have the information being requested by Tuesday next week.  Mr. Connolly stated that they could have it tomorrow.  Councilwoman Knudsen said that they should put it on the agenda for Wednesday, August 14th.  She thinks the residents in that neighborhood are entitled to see this come to some conclusion as quickly as possible, and she thinks that the residents are owed at least some modicum of expediency.  Mayor Hache added that he thinks the residents are owed a bit more diligence on this because they don’t have all of the information.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked when everyone got the packets.  Ms. Mailander stated that the information with the questions and answers was handing out this evening.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked about A, B, and C.  Ms. Mailander stated that it was last week.  Councilman Sedon stated that they should wait until everyone feels more comfortable.  They need a resolution to this but he thinks that people need to feel comfortable one way or another and more time is required for that.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that at some point; you drag your feet for a decade; and here we are tonight with an opportunity to change the trajectory of where this is leading; and she suggested adding to the agenda for next week.

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that she understands the lowest bidder on concrete estimated $11,000 while the other two received the same specs and came out to $48,520 and $52,500.  She asked if their guy underbid to get the job and then they are going to get a change order.  Mr. Connolly stated that they were not going to get a change order, as he is required to do the work laid out.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that was the piece that she didn’t feel that she had a handle on.  Mr. Connolly stated that by taking a look at line item 5, you will see there are variations there.  As well, you can’t look at these breakdowns because they throw numbers all over the place.  This is meant more for the architects because they understand how it works.  There was some additional discussion about the concrete work. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that the estimates are all over the place, and she asked what the true estimates are line by line because they do so many change orders a year.  Ms. Mailander stated that they do several change orders a year, but asked if Councilwoman Walsh was saying that the only time they would have a change order on this bid is if she found something that wasn’t on this bid.  Mr. Connolly stated that as long as it’s on his drawings they are obligated to install it.  Ms. Mailander and Mr. Connolly were in agreement that the contractors are bound by those numbers to do whatever is stipulated on those drawings.  Ms. Mailander added that in her mind, the only time there was going to be a change order is if they encounter something in a wall that they didn’t realize was there.  Mr. Connolly agreed, but added that you would have to look at the contract documents to understand the project but it is all there. 

 

Ms. Mailander asked Mr. Connolly if he had some sort of estimate or cost breakdown in his mind of what he thought each item was going to cost.  Mr. Connolly stated that in his mind he didn’t prepare that, but it should be his original estimate.  Ms. Mailander clarified that it was the overall number and not line by line.  Mr. Connolly stated that looking at Dell Tech’s line items for specialties he has $0 but in the specifications it is for soap dispensers in the rest room, so he may have put that in another line which is a communication problem, but it is on their drawings and he is required to include those items.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she understood the documents and that they were using a computer system that probably assigned the values.  The contractors involved here are prequalified and so it is a very specialized area and the way they are breaking this out is probably very different than for your house. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that she doesn’t think it is very different from a house, and asked them to show her where the doorknobs and hinges are.  Mr. Connolly stated that there are about 40 pages of drawings, so there is no list as it is graphic.  Councilwoman Walsh asked where they are placing these items if not under specialties as Mr. Connolly had mentioned.  Mr. Connolly stated that it was on the contract documents and they are obligated to install everything that is on his contract documents. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh addressed the Village Attorney, Mr. Rogers, and asked if they sign off on anything like this other than the unforeseen, how they would protect the Village so that they can’t come back with any changes.  Mr. Connolly stated that was why the Village hired him so that he can make sure that they are doing everything that is on those contract documents.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that Mr. Connolly wasn’t the one that is guaranteeing what they are putting out.  Mr. Connolly stated that he was guaranteeing that they are installing what’s on those drawings, so if it’s not on his drawings it doesn’t get installed.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she understands that, but for her, if they are saying concrete work is $11,000 and there is no other concrete work being done and for the other bidders to have it four times as much she can’t see that.  Mr. Connolly stated that they should take the whole list away from the Village Council and just look at the bottom line because they are all right on top of one another and it is hard to dissect their numbers.

 

Councilwoman Walsh asked Mr. Rogers what the protections are that they can put in place legally for this to happen.  Mr. Rogers stated that it sounds like the protections are in the contract documents, but if there was a challenge to the price and a request for a change order or some other type of deviation, or change in terms of the work that is to be performed, they would have to look to the documents to try and identify where the particular issue is.  Just like any other contract that has detail to it; they are obligated to perform on accordance with their bid that was accepted.  Their experience is that there are deviations sometimes, and the detail on this is much more significant than you would normally find.  They have had some historic preservation work in the past with the train station plaza, and there were some issues with those but they may not have been as detailed in terms of the specifications.  You rely on those things to ensure that they are as sound as you can possibly get and you do whatever you can to protect it.

 

Mr. Connolly stated that he works for the Village and he is going to make sure that what is on those drawings is what the Village is going to get for that cost.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that Mr. Connolly would get that information to the Village Council tomorrow and then they would add it to next week’s agenda.

 

Councilman Sedon made a motion to suspend the Work Session and convene a Special Public Meeting.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        Councilman Voigt

ABSTAIN:      None

 

  1. SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETING - SEE SEPARATE MINUTES

 

Mayor Hache called for a motion to adjourn, there was a motion by Councilman Sedon to adjourn the Special Public Meeting and reconvene the Work Session.   Mayor Hache seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        Councilman Voigt

ABSTAIN:      None

 

  1. DISCUSSION

 

  1. Ridgewood Water

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – 2020 Ford Escape

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is a resolution in the amount is $26,349 for the purchase of a 2020 Ford Escape through the Sourcewell Cooperative Pricing National Auto Fleet Group of Watsonville, California.  It will replace resolution 19-158 which was adopted on June 12, 2019.  The date to order a 2019 model had expired so this is for a 2020 model.  Mayor Hache asked about the difference in price between the Police Department vehicles and the Water Department vehicle.  Ms. Mailander stated that she was told that the floor mats and the cargo mat made the difference in the price, but she would confirm that.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that the sticker price may be one thing, but they may be getting a discount.  Mayor Hache stated that $1,500 was too much for the floor and cargo mats that they were proposing on the police vehicles.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would figure out the pricing and let the Village Council know.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Pumps and Motors – Repair, Replacement and Installation – NSI Neal Systems

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this resolution is to purchase items related to the maintenance of pumps and motors and to award it under the North Jersey Wastewater Cooperative Pricing Systems of Newtown, PA not to exceed $26,000.  The materials are for the calibration of meters.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Pumps and Motors – Repair, Replacement and Installation – Universal Electric Motor

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for state purchase from Universal Electric Motor of Hackensack.  This is not to exceed $20,000 and is for repair and replacement of electric pumps and is under the North Jersey Wastewater Cooperative Pricing System.

 

  1. Parking

 

  1. Request for Loading Zone at Train Station

 

Ms. Mailander stated that there is a request for the loading zone at the Train Station.  The Village has an agreement with a vendor to operate the coffee stand at the Train Station, and that person recently received a ticket while setting up for the day’s customers early one morning.  The vendor’s employee did not have a parking permit nor would they qualify for one as they are not a Ridgewood resident.  There is a picture where there is a space that is not striped as a parking stall, so they are recommending that this be designated as a loading zone for the coffee concession stand and later for the deliveries that Social Services receives for its facility.

 

Mayor Hache asked if it would be marked as a loading zone.  Ms. Mailander stated that it would be, and it would be short term as loading zones are.

 

  1. Reserved Parking Spaces at the Train Station

 

Ms. Mailander stated that one reserved parking space is for the New Jersey Transit representative per the agreement with New Jersey Transit.  The other parking space would be for the operator of the concession stand and then Social Services.  The concession stand would have it until 10:30 A.M. and then Social Services would use it after that.

 

Mayor Hache asked if the spaces were in the agreements for the concession stand or Social Services.  Ms. Mailander stated that it wasn’t in their agreements.  Mayor Hache stated that he thought they should consider memorializing this agreement as being part of what is included.  Ms. Mailander stated that in addition to doing this, Mr. Rogers could perhaps write up an agreement for this one space to be shared by Social Services and the concession stand.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked how much of the day they will be using that space.  Ms. Mailander stated that in the loading zone she didn’t know, but this is for a parking space.

 

  1. Request to Amend Parking Ordinance – Monte Vista Avenue

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for Monte Vista Avenue, Park Slope, North Hillside Place, and Madison Place.  The proposed parking changes were sent out to 57 residents of the area and they received 12 responses.  The majority was in favor of the change to 4 hours, but there were some other preferences. 

 

Mayor Hache stated that the reason this was brought to them was with the commuters and he agreed that Saturday wasn’t necessary.  Councilman Sedon stated that there are usually spaces in the Train Station parking lot on Saturday, adding that he would be good with Monday through Friday unless Saturday is a problem in the future.  There is also wide support for four hours which gives enough time for service people and cuts down on confusion if it is throughout the neighborhood.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that inevitably people park in front of your house because it is a public street, and she agreed with the majority regarding Saturday.  Everyone was in agreement about the four hour parking limit.

 

  1. Budget

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Replacement of Carpeting at Several Village Hall Locations

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they re-carpeted several of the rooms in this building, some of them being the court room and several offices.  The next phase of that work will include the Village Clerk’s Office, Assessor’s Office, Violations, Water Department, and Building Department, in an amount not to exceed $44,122.92.  Brothers Flooring of Hackensack is under state contract and they do have this budgeted in the capital budget.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Two 2019 Chevrolet Tahoes – Police Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Police Department placed an order for two 2019 Chevrolet Tahoes with Day Chevrolet under the New Jersey State Purchasing Program.  They had to be ordered before April 15th in order to beat the closing of Chevrolet’s open ordering/production time because the State Contract expired May 1st

 

The Village submitted a Letter of Intent to Purchase contingent on the availability of funds.  The total amount is not to exceed $73,648.08.  There are also other vendors to outfit the cars.  The Tahoes will replace patrol cars #15 and #21, which are 2015 Ford Explorers and have exceeded their usable time as police cars.  Some of the equipment in those old cars will be used in the new ones.

 

Regional Communications will be used for emergency light and police car equipment supply and installation, and Motorola Solutions for multi-band car radios.  These are three separate resolutions.

 

  1. Award Contract – Change Order No. 1 – Train Station Parking Expansion

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they expanded the Train Station parking and realized it was a good time to complete several sections of the Gamewell fiber optic communications cable since it will be needed in the new parking garage.  They also relocated the traffic signal pole to improve the site radius as well as connected the signal’s electric supply to a meter circuit.  When it came time to resurface the lot it became apparent additional asphalt and milling was necessary.  The change order is in the amount of $64,361.95.  She pointed out that even with the change order it is still $69,000 less than the second lowest bidder.

 

  1. Declare Surplus – Police Department/Parking Enforcement – Two Ford Crown Victoria’s

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this resolution was to declare property surplus for two Police Department 2011 Ford Crown Victoria’s.  They are in need of repairs with estimated costs exceeding the value of the vehicles, including the engine and air conditioning.  The expense to repair them exceeds the value of the vehicles, so they will be declared surplus.

 

  1. Parking Capital Bond Ordinance – Two Ford Escapes – Police Department/Parking Enforcement

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they need to write a bond ordinance for this, in the amount of $57,000 which will introduce and then they can award the contract after the adoption and effective date.

 

  1. General Capital Bond Ordinance – Purchase of Ford F350 Pickup – Traffic & Signal Division & 2019 Ford Ranger – Parks

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the purchase of the Ford F350 Pickup is for both the Traffic and Signal Division and a 2019 Ford Ranger for the Parks and Recreation Division.  For the Parks and Recreation Division, it is for the Supervisor to perform his day to day operations, transporting personnel and equipment, as well as checking on the condition of parks and fields.  It is a 2019 Ford Ranger through the Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing, National Auto Fleet Group of California, in an amount not to exceed $52,226.

 

The Traffic and Signal Ford F-350 Pickup will be purchased instead of the van that the contract was awarded for previously.  They were told by the Bond Council that they needed a different ordinance for the purchase of these vehicles, because the van is not the same lifespan or type of vehicle as the pickup.  Their recommendation was for a new bond ordinance and when that is adopted they can award both of these contracts.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they knew the year of the van that is being replaced.  Ms. Mailander stated part of it is they are going to add it to snowplowing, as well.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they usually have more information.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would get this information for her. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh asked if they were prohibited as a municipality from having a direct relationship with Ford.  Ms. Mailander stated that they would have to bid it, but that is why they go with State Contract Cooperative Purchasing. Councilwoman Walsh stated that she was asking because her company has contracted with Ford and they get a rebate check back from Ford each year and it is pretty substantial.  Mr. Rogers stated that local public contract law would not allow for that.  The only way they are able to do this so quickly is because Ford has qualified for the State Contract, so they go through that purchasing level rather than bidding it out.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that these prices are more than what she was paying at her company.  Ms. Mailander stated that is what happens with public purchasing, unfortunately.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that sometimes there are differences with heavy duty or special equipment.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that the Village was overpaying for the vehicles.

 

  1. General Capital Bond Ordinance – Re-Appropriating Funds – Purchase of Scarab Windrow Turner

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was re-appropriating funds for the purchase of a scarab windrow turner that is used at the Lakeview Composting Facility.  It is currently non-operational and is well beyond its useful life and repairs would be cost prohibitive.  It was determined that several previously approved Capital projects were no longer required and were completed with excess funds available.  The reappropriation of funds from these projects may be utilized for this purchase. 

 

  1. Increase Fire Prevention Inspection Fees

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Fire Department proposal is to increase the fees which haven’t been increased in eight years and it will put us more in line with other towns in Bergen County.  The State bills for the life hazard building inspections and gives the Village a percentage of the fees they collect.  Life Hazard Building inspections are inspections of bars, BYOB restaurants, and supermarkets.  Most of these increases are minimal.

 

Chief Van Goor stated that both the Fire Department and the State perform inspections.  The State charges and they increased their fees at the beginning of the year.  The Fire Department looked back at the ordinance to see if we had to change the ordinance based on that and realized we hadn’t changed our fees since 2011.  The Fire Department came up with increases because it has been eight years since there were increases. 

 

Inspector Krug stated that they were given leeway with how they wanted to address their fee schedule, and he reached out to towns with populations that are similar or slightly over.  Some of the proposed increases are smoke detector certifications, which they currently charge $75 for.  Recently, as of January 1st, the State has added to the code and increased the Village’s workload with that.  They find that the inspections take a minimum of two visits there, and they are looking to increase the fees to $100 which puts them in line with surrounding towns.  The other inspections that he has are businesses within the business district.  When they are talking about the Life Hazard Uses, BYOB fees are set by the State.  As an inspector, he goes out and performs the inspections and the State collects that fee and then reimburses the town.  Most of the fee changes have to do with mercantile stores, offices and multi-family dwellings. 

 

Instead of billing within the windows of units he would like to have a flat fee of $100 and then bill per number of units on that property.  Inspector Krug stated that he liked having the flat fee because in the past they have been billing a garden apartment complex, with seven buildings, $270 in the past, but if you really think about it, it is seven different structures.  They receive seven different fire alarm test reports, seven different sprinkler reports, and deal with issues in seven different buildings.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it makes sense to her as they are doing multiple works so they are right to approach it that way.  Mayor Hache stated that looking at the changes depending on the size of the business.  As the range of percentage increases going from 13% to 18% with the higher increases at the lower end and then for the mercantile the range of increases is 13% to 25%, and the 25% is at the lower end.  It seems that there is a big disparity there between them, but looking at the fire safety permits it looks pretty consistent.  Mayor Hache asked if they could be more consistent with the increases.  Inspector Krug stated that it was going up $10.  Mayor Hache stated that the percentages were about a 29% increase.  Chief Van Goor stated that those fees are set by the State of New Jersey.  Mayor Hache stated that the standard was applied unevenly and when looking at the fees that the Village is imposing, it’s not consistent.  Inspector Krug stated that there is an option where the Village could introduce an ordinance that says they just follow the State’s inspection fees and go that route.  These types of permits are for special events such as food trucks or a tent on your property.

 

Mayor Hache stated that the increases that are proposed here range from 13% to 18% with 18% at the low end.  Looking at the second category the range is 13% to 25%, and he was asking if there was a way to get the percentage increase more in line.  Inspector Krug stated that they could look at that.  Mayor Hache asked if the consideration was in terms of keeping in line with the dollar increases that the State has.  Inspector Krug stated that it was to keep it in line with other towns, and he would see that discrepancy within the current fees, as well.  He added that when he worked with the Chief he came up with the average increase of 16%, and some of that is just due to rounding out figures.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that looking at the increase at 0-500 square feet, the increase is $10 but looking at a large square footage the increase is $40, and even though that percentage isn’t actually greater, there must be more involved in that particular location.  Mayor Hache asked if it was more work to do a smaller building than a larger one.  Chief Van Goor stated that there is a lot more scheduling involved in smaller inspections, chasing down owners, phone calls, and arranging appointments.  For a larger building, it is easier to meet just a building director.  Mayor Hache stated that then these amounts are not arbitrary, but are correlated to the amount of work that is necessary for those structures.  There was additional discussion about the size of buildings and the percent increase.  Chief Van Goor stated that every inspection is done differently.  The only thing that is uniform is the code that he enforces.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Six Panasonic Tough Books – Police Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that there are several different computer and printer related contracts to award.  This is for six Toughbooks for the Police department.  Wireless Communications is a vendor through state contract, with a cost not to exceed $30,847.80.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Server Upgrade

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for a server upgrade for the E-Ticket program and new Finance Server to replace the current system.  This is under State Contract to Dell of Round Rock, Texas in an amount not to exceed $41,695.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Printer Upgrades and Replacements

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for printer upgrades and replacements for Finance, Water, Engineering, Police, and EMS.  The quote is for 13 printers in total and will be under State Contract to SHI of Somerset, not to exceed $24,079.81.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Ruggedized Switches and Network Upgrades – Various Departments

 

Ms. Mailander stated that ruggedized switches are meant for areas of high and low humidity such as Graydon Pool, Pump Houses, Storage Areas, and Lockboxes.  This is under state contract to SHI of Somerset not to exceed $18,154.60.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Aruba Switches and Network Upgrades – Various Departments

 

Ms. Mailander stated this was to handle the increase of data.  Separate certain data points to elevate possible bottlenecking and increase efficiency on backups by creating a management network.  With the onset of utilizing ip based phones, security cameras, and other node, the increase of bandwidth is needed in order for the network to run at an optimal state.  The current switches are between 4 and 8 years of age and are showing some signs of degradation.  The State Contract is to SHI of Somerset, not to exceed $92,239.14.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Public Access and Wifi Upgrade – Village Facilities and Park Locations

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was for Wifi equipment and to expand coverage in Village facilities/park locations.  This contract is with SHI of Somerset, not to exceed $28,151.00.  Mayor Hache asked if the wifi upgrade was going to include Van Neste Square in the scope.  Mr. Hansen stated that it would.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Renewal of Annual Spatial Data Logic Software License

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for the renewal of spatial data logic software license for one year.  IT is currently used by the Building Department for permits and zoning and the Health Department for pet licensing.  They will be looking into integrating the system into the ESRI Project.  The price for renewal is $31,250 and will be awarded under stated contract to SHI of Somerset.

 

  1. Award Contract – Leaf Collection Services for Area B – Public Works Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they bid out the leaf pickup for Area B and had two planholders eligible to bid and received one bid.  The sole bid was $79,800.00.  The proposal calls for the contractor to make three pickups in section B, collect the leaves, and then transport them to the Lakeview Compost Facility.  The bidder was Faircut Services of Montville, and this is a first year for them.  For the past two years, the contracts were $88,500 and $92,460.  Councilwoman Sedon asked if they were fully aware of the scope of work that’s involved, and asked if there was any way it could go up.  Ms. Mailander stated that they have to do it at this price and do not get a change order.  They also assign an employee to check up on section B to make sure that they are being picked up in a timely manner.  This is a new vendor and they are looking forward to working with them.

 

  1. Declare Surplus – Streets Department – Paving Box

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is to declare a paving box surplus, and then once it is declared surplus it will be sold on GovDeals.com.

 

  1. Resolution Cancelling General Capital Ordinance Balances

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is a resolution cancelling general capital ordinance balances.  The CFO and the Treasurer have revised all general capital bond ordinances, some have been completed or circumstances have changed.  There are balances that are left from purchases that have already been made.  They are going to cancel as shown in the attachment, which will result in a reduction in deferred charges unfunded and monies being restored to the General Capital Fund Balance.

 

  1. Award Professional Services Contract – Professional Planning Consultant

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they were working to correct a diversion of open spaces in the Village of Ridgewood. Topology NJ of Newark was hired last year to provide professional consulting services on this matter.  There is a need to extend this professional agreement to help guide this issue to final resolution with Green Acres.  It will be an amount not to exceed $35,000.  They will prove valuable as the Village moves through the application process, which was recommended by Green Acres.  Once through the application process, ultimately you have to be approved by the State Legislature.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she didn’t understand whether or not they were trying to take a different approach with this as they made applications in good faith and are being held up by this even though the property still went to public use.  She added that she didn’t know where it was written that they could hold this money up, and asked if they looked into that at all.  Mr. Rogers stated that he has not looked into the legality of whether they have the authority to withhold the funding that our taxpayers contribute, but he assumes they would.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that this is something that happened decades ago and here the Village taxpayers are taking a hit. 

 

Mr. Rogers stated that he thought their position was arbitrary in the beginning when they say that the amount of money that was spent on Schedler and Habernickel doesn’t get considered with regard to this because those two events happened long after the property in question and the diversion was utilized.  They thought about challenging it but at that time determined not to and the decision hasn’t been revisited.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they are spending more money here and the taxpayers are still the ones being denied.  Mr. Rogers stated that if it was something she wanted him to do he would be glad to.  There was a consensus among the Village Council.  Ms. Mailander stated that with the consultant they only pay them when they use them.  Councilwoman Knudsen reiterated her sentiments, as if they were acting in good faith and this was pulled out of the blue for the Village to look into and determine if they should be considering other alternatives.

 

  1. Shared Services Agreement – Municipal Court Administrator and Deputy Municipal Court Administrator (Glen Rock)

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Village’s Municipal Court Administrator retired on August 1st.  The Administrative Office of the Courts in Hackensack is strongly encouraging Municipal Courts to create Shared Services Agreements with other Municipal Courts.  The Borough of Glen Rock’s Municipal Court Administrator, Kimberly McWilliams, is currently the Village’s Alternate Municipal Court Administrator.  The Borough of Glen Rock was approached about a Shared Services Agreement with the Village, whereby Glen Rock will provide a Municipal Court Administrator and Ridgewood will provide a Deputy Municipal Court Administrator and the use of our two clerical staff, as well as allow Glen Rock to use the Village’s video conferencing system to communicate with the jails and correctional facilities.  The Borough of Glen Rock has agreed to a Shared Services Agreement as outlined, for a fee of $50,000 a year.  It will allow each municipal court to remain in their respective municipalities.  The Deputy Court Administrator and the two staff may have to be at Glen Rock.  They are looking to start it September 1st.  This also needs an agreement and approval from the Assignment Judge of Bergen County.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that Shared Services are a great thing and the courts in Bergen County will ultimately be forced into sharing.  The Village is looking forward to doing this with Glen Rock.

 

  1. Shared Services Agreement – Floodplain Protection Planning Services (Bergen County)

 

Ms. Mailander stated that in May the Village Council authorized her to execute a Declaration of Interest Form in order to proceed with Floodplain Protection Planning Services.  The Bergen County Freeholders have adopted a resolution to authorize the Shared Services Agreement to have this plan developed through The Land Conservancy of New Jersey and The Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program for the Village, at no cost to the Village.

 

The Village Council now has to adopt a resolution to authorize the Shared Services Agreement, submit it to the County, and then The Land Conservancy of New Jersey and The Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program will be able to begin working on the plan.

 

  1. Ordinance to Amend Salary Ordinances for Supervisors, Non-Union, Blue Collar, and White Collar Employees

 

Ms. Mailander stated that these are either titles which they had not used before and are now setting salary ranges for them, or titles where they adjusted the salary ranges.  This is a clean-up ordinance.

 

  1. Policy

 

  1. Request to Amend Chapter 212 – Tennis Courts – Rules and Regulations

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the current rules and regulations will remain, which is that you have to have a permit tag to be displayed on request, you have an application, a registration, collecting fees.  She read through the rules and regulations that were now added. 

 

  1. Amending Chapter 190 Land Use Development – Illuminated Signs in Business District

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was sent to the Village Council by the Planning Board.  This does expire on December 31st, so she would like to get it adopted by the end of the year.  They can bring it back September 4th, but she would like to proceed with it at that time.  There was a consensus that the Village Council was willing to introduce it as proposed by the Planning Board.

 

  1. Flagpole Ordinance

 

Ms. Mailander stated that Mr. Rogers put together a memorandum of the issues that should be considered for the recently installed flagpole at Memorial Park at Van Neste Square.  Mr. Rogers stated that this was if the Village Council wanted to take action and regulate the use of the flagpole.  He added that there are recognized constitutional issues with regards to any flags that are placed on the flagpole that can’t be regulated with regard to content or what they are showing.  There are a number of things that can be discussed.  There is a weight limit on the flagpole, so the Village Council can think about the type of material of flag, the size of the flag to be displayed, the number of flags that can be permitted on this flagpole at any one time, the time period that the flag is going to be flown, and the duration.  Consideration has to be given for other flags or opportunities for other flags to be flown if there is a request.  They should consider setting up a system or a permit to be requested so that they can fill out the information and the specifications with regard to the flag.  He reviewed the memorandum and additional recommendations regarding permits and timeframes.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if someone comes in with Flag A and has to get a permit and there is a fee associated with the permit, who is hoisting the flag onto the flagpole.  Mr. Rogers stated that he believes that the Village would, but it could certainly be discussed and those are some of the things that can be built into the permit fee.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked what if there was a month when someone wanted their flag there for a month but a second, third, or fourth flag comes in then maybe if everyone has their permit in on time then maybe the month gets split.  Mr. Rogers stated that was one of the reasons you may not want to fly something for the whole month, but say two week intervals.  He had a conversation a few months ago with Mr. Rutishauser with regard to weight limits of the flagpole and what can be done.  Mayor Hache stated that the size and number would be determined by the specs of the flagpole.  Mr. Rogers pointed out that those were areas that you could regulate where safety trumps constitutional issues.

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that the type of flag is going to be the easy piece.  Getting the fee for the Village staff to put the flag up and review the application, she felt they should tailor similar to the trestle sign. Mr. Rogers stated that what they do with holiday displays is to advise people they can’t apply before a certain date or after a certain date.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that people would need time to get the flag, as well.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that if she has a flag that says Happy Birthday Mike because that is her free speech, you can do that.  The train trestle is reserved for non-profits, so there are rules assigned there, but in this instance they are saying anything goes.  Councilman Sedon stated that there would not be a challenge to the content unless someone put up something that was offensive.

 

Mr. Rogers stated that safety was the issue, so if there was a flag that would promote anarchy, or puts people in peril, or deals with issues of safety, then there is a possibility that you can regulate that.  He can certainly work up the wording that would cover that type of circumstance.  Other than that, Mike’s Birthday would be known by everyone.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked what type of flag would promote anarchy.  Mr. Rogers stated that the only thing that comes to mind was a flag that said kill everyone, which would be something that would be precluded from going up there.  Councilman Sedon asked if they could do anything about offensive language.  Mr. Rogers stated that free speech is designed to prevent people from being offensive, so you have to be careful when you’re talking about that.

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that in states where they flew the confederate flag, there must be change to their ordinances that could be reviewed to reflect that change.  So, maybe they should look into how it was worded.  Mr. Rogers agreed.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they put up the United States flag instead.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that someone found the Betsy Ross flag, and Mr. Rogers stated that was why you stay away from offensive in the wording. Councilman Sedon stated that he was at an event a number of years ago but someone was handing out stickers that said F Cancer, which is a positive message but it is packaged with an offensive word.  Mr. Rogers stated that in terms of regulating the wording, that aspect of it has been dealt with by the courts a number of times, and they give direction as to what you can and cannot do.

 

Councilman Sedon stated that on the permitting, he was thinking about the same thing that Councilwoman Walsh was about the train trestle sign and suggested Mr. Rogers look at that wording.  Mr. Rogers stated that they do have regulations with regard to the holiday displays and they need time to process the permit and make sure that you are going to be able to accommodate the request as best you can.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that if the pole can maintain two flags they should always have the second be the American Flag, because if two flags are approved you could have opposing positions and then you are missing the point.  Mr. Rogers stated that doesn’t take any type of precedent.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that the American Flag always has to be on top.  Councilwoman Walsh agreed.  Councilman Sedon stated that he would just say only one flag at a time.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that if it is going to be one flag, in the sense of equal opportunity, then you have to narrow your window of opportunity for that flag to fly because you might have overlap.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that it is just like the trestle with first come first served.  Mr. Rogers stated that the trestle is regulated by the space, whereas this isn’t regulated at all.  Ms. Mailander suggested they come up with some kind of proposed ordinance for the future and bring it back to the Village Council.  

 

  1. Green Team and REAC

 

Councilman Sedon stated that there is an obvious synergy between the Green Team and REAC, all they are doing for REAC is changing the name to Green Ridgewood.  After he pulled the Village Code, the biggest changes being made were changing all the names from REAC to Green Ridgewood and then removing language that designates an alternate and making everyone a member.  The Green Team originally was put together as a sub-committee for REAC, but they want to be recertified next year.  So, around January, the Green Team is going to split off from REAC and get the Village certified again for Sustainable Jersey.  The members checked with Sustainable Jersey, and they seemed fine with it.  These are minor changes to clean up these two ordinances and reflect what is going on right now with the committees.

 

Ms. Mailander asked if REAC was just changing its name to Green Ridgewood Committee, and then the Green Team is going to remain as is.  The only change to the ordinance is establishing it, so that anything that mentions it is going to say Green Ridgewood Committee, but they remain as two separate committees.  Councilman Sedon stated that they would remain as two separate committees because you don’t have to register every year with Sustainable Jersey. So, that way, it allows the Green Team to splinter off and focus on the application and then of course, if Green Ridgewood can support the Sustainable Jersey pieces of it.  Mayor Hache asked if designating the members from alternate to regular was just for Green Ridgewood.  Councilman Sedon stated that it was just Green Ridgewood members.  He added that it is just a rebrand for a green year with the plastic bag ban and Earth Day.  Ms. Mailander stated they would have these two ordinances with the changes made.  

 

  1. Operations

 

  1. 2020 Village Council Meeting Schedule

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this year there are a lot of different holidays that interfere with their regular meeting days.  The recommendation is to move each meeting forward in January, and in February they are moving those meetings forward one week, as well.  In April, the second Wednesday is the first night of Passover, and so they are recommending that those be moved forward one week.  July 1, is a Wednesday, so they are moving it forward one week.  In November, Veterans Day is Wednesday and so they are recommending that they move that one to a Monday because the following week is the League of Municipalities Conference.  All the other dates remain the same.  She also wanted to move the Coffee with the Council date to September 12, 2020.

 

  1. Approve Grant Application – New Jersey Department of Transportation

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is an annual Municipal Aid grant that the Village applies for and put in to received funds to resurface South Broad Street from East Ridgewood Avenue to the municipal line with Glen Rock.  Part of the grant application process is that they need a resolution to approve it and submit with the application.

 

  1. 2020 Municipal Aid Grant – Engineering Division

 

  1. Major Soil Permit – Hudson Street Parking Lot

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Engineering Division’s conditions for the major soil moving permit were discussed at the Planning Board last night.  They have been incorporated into the resolution and trucking routes will be carefully coordinated with the Village’s Police Department.  They received a letter from the Planning Board that they did discuss this last night and recommended that the governing body issue the major soil moving permit.

  1. Resident Survey

 

Ms. Mailander stated that during the budget discussions, she mentioned that the Borough of Fair Lawn had conducted a resident survey several years ago, to determine what was and was not important to residents.  They then used this information to determine priorities for budgeting.  She suggested sending it out in September and then getting it back in late October.  She reviewed the questions that Fair Lawn asked, and what the Village could possibly ask.

 

Mayor Hache stated that when you are asking questions it is important to have the context so if you ask someone how do you feel about rear yard pickup, and would they love it if they knew what the savings could be.  He added it was important to have the context of the numbers behind it.  He asked how this survey was distributed.  Ms. Mailander stated that they mailed it, but it could certainly be distributed.  Mayor Hache suggested including a unique number so they could assure there were no duplicates.  Ms. Mailander stated that they did not accept anonymous surveys, and one survey per household.  She also suggested doing it similar to how it was done with the Master Plan. 

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that if you don’t allow anonymous you aren’t allowing a filter for the information; a lot of people feel very uncomfortable completing a survey and putting their name on it, especially if they are senior citizens.  Ms. Mailander added that she would talk to Bob Rooney to see if he had any related budget questions that maybe they could charge for, or get an idea of whether people value that service.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that it is important that this is a very small piece of the municipal tax dollars, as they need to recalculate those percentages because the BOE budget has gone up significantly at a greater pace than the Village’s municipal budget.

 

  1. FEMA Flood Map Inclusions

 

Ms. Mailander stated that there are new flood maps that are going to be effective on August 28, 2019 and they have a significant incongruity or error in them.  The area of concern is along the Ho-Ho-Kus Brook, from First Street southward on either side of North Maple Avenue to the brook itself.  It looks like approximately 33 additional properties will be in the flood plain.  Engineering has checked the elevation of the newly included properties and feels there is a significant error being created by the FEMA/FIRM maps.  There are some property owners who may be considering a legal challenge to this to have the mapping corrected.  Therefore, the Village Engineer has indicated that perhaps the Village may be interested in joining the residents to have the mapping corrected due to the number of effected properties, subject to Mr. Roger’s legal opinion.

 

Mr. Rogers stated that he hasn’t had a chance to talk to Mr. Rutishauser about it yet, but he thinks the Village’s position would be much different than the individual property owners.  There is certainly a mechanism out there for a municipality to challenge any type of error and see if they can define the error and what may happen.  He suggested they support the best they can but don’t join or become a party to any lawsuit that is started by a property owner.  The Village should try to deal with this administratively with FEMA to correct whatever error is there, so that they are doing their part to try to help the residents.

 

  1. REVIEW OF AUGUST 14, 2019 PUBLIC MEETING AGENDA

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was a review of the August 14, 2019 Public Meeting Agenda.

 

Proclamations: Commemorate 100th Anniversary of Ridgewood’s American Legion Post 53 and Honor Its Mission as a Patriotic Veterans Organization Devoted to Mutual Helpfulness; Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over 2019 Statewide Crackdown; Declare September Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month; and Declare September National Preparedness Month.

 

There are no ordinances for introduction or public hearing for Ridgewood Water.

 

Resolutions for Ridgewood Water include: Award Contract Under Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing Contract – 2020 Ford Escape; Award Contract Under North Jersey Wastewater Cooperative Purchasing Contract – Installation and Replacement of Pumps and Motors; and Award Contract Under North Jersey Wastewater Cooperative Purchasing Contract – Installation and Replacement of Pumps and Motors.

 

The following ordinances are scheduled for introduction: 3729 – Bond Ordinance – Acquisition of Vehicles for Parking Utility; 3732 – Bond Ordinance – Acquisition of Vehicles – Parks Department and Traffic & Signal Department; 3733 – Bond Ordinance – Reappropriating Funds for Scarab Windrow Turner; 3734 – Establish Loading Zone at Train Station Parking Lot; 3735 – Establish Reserved Parking Spaces at Train Station Parking Lot – NJ Transit and Concession Stand/Social Services; 3736 – Amend Chapter 265 – Vehicles and Traffic – Time Limit Parking on Monte Vista, Park Slope, Madison Place and North Hillside Avenue; 3737 – Amend Fire Prevention Inspection Fees; 3738 – Amend Various Salary Ordinances; and 3739 – Amend Chapter 212 – Tennis Courts – Rules and Regulations.

 

The scheduled public hearings include: 3728 – Designate Parking Spaces in Train Station Lot for Hudson Street Lot Permit Holders; 3730 – Amend Chapter 190 – Land Use and Development – Swimming Pools; and 3731 – Amend Chapter 190 – Land Use and Development – Permit Real Estate Open House Signs.

 

Resolutions include: Title 59 Approval – Leaf Collection Services; Award Contract – Leaf Collection Services; Award Contract Under State Contract – Carpeting for Various Offices in Village Hall; Award Contract Under State Contract – 2 Chevrolet Tahoes – Police Department; Award Contract Under State Contract – Mobile Radios for Police Vehicles; Award Contract Under State Contract – Furnishing and Delivering Patrol Equipment for Police Vehicles; Award Contract Under State Contract – Panasonic Tough Books – Police Department; Award Contract Under State Contract – Server Upgrade; Award Contract Under State Contract – Printer Upgrades and Replacements; Award Contract Under State Contract – Ruggedized Network Switches; Award Contract Under State Contract – Aruba Switches and Network Upgrades; Award Contract Under State Contract – Wi-Fi Access Points; Award Contract Under State Contract – Renewal of Spatial Data Logic Software; Award Professional Services Contract – Professional Planning Consultant – Green Acres Diversion; Authorize Change Order – Train Station Parking Expansion; Authorize Change Order – Resurfacing Glen Tennis Court; Authorize Shared Services Agreement – Municipal Court Administrator and Deputy Municipal Court Administrator (Glen Rock); Authorize Shared Services Agreement – Floodplain Protection Planning Services (Bergen County); Approve Submission of NJDOT Grant Application and Authorize Execution of Grant Agreement – South Broad Street Resurfacing; Authorize Major Soil Moving Permit – Hudson Street Parking Lot; Declare Property Surplus – Police Department Vehicles; Declare Property Surplus – Streets Department Paving Box; and Cancel General Capital Ordinance Balances.

 

  1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

 

Boyd Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that he was listening with some interest to the discussion about the two parking spaces that are in front of Westside Bagels, and the first thing that came to his mind was how did two parking spaces get installed at that location and nobody knows about it as it was all done unofficially.  He wondered how many other parking spaces are there in the Village that are unlawful and were not created by ordinance.  He asked if this was a process that the Village Council was going to undertake now to ensure that there were no other rogue parking spaces.  He asked how many summonses that were issued for people who parked there, as those have to be invalid.  As the spaces aren’t legit, how could you issue a summons to someone.  Mr. Loving stated that people are putting money in the meters but the spaces aren’t authorized, and he asked if they could continue to collect revenue for spaces that aren’t on the books. He understands that the businesses don’t want those spaces removed but they are unlawful.  He reiterated his sentiments and added that it seems like a big mess to him and he is concerned that there didn’t seem to be any urgency in their voices that this needs to be fixed right away and he suggested talking with Mr. Rogers regarding any summonses that had been issued regarding those two spots.

 

There were no additional comments from the public.

 

Mayor Hache stated that Mr. Loving raised some interesting and important questions.  Mr. Rogers stated that he found out about the lack of enacting an ordinance yesterday or today from Susan and she asked the same questions.  He doesn’t know that there is a need for urgency regarding tonight’s discussion but the steps have been taken to make sure that enforcement on those gets directed in the proper way.  If someone wants to challenge the issuance of a summons they can do that.  The aspect of how long it has been there and as far as he remembers those spaces have been striped there.  There may be others in the ordinances, but the Manager’s office is prepared to handle those things.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen added that all this predates the current Village Council and was uncovered by chance.  Mayor Hache stated that they can use the inventory of the meters and compare it to established ordinances.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. RESOLUTION TO GO INTO CLOSED SESSION

 

Deputy Village Clerk, Donna Jackson read Resolution #19-252 to go into Closed Session as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. ADJOURNMENT

 

There being no further business to come before the Village Council, on a motion by Councilman Sedon, seconded by Councilwoman Knudsen, and carried unanimously by voice vote, the Village Council’s Work Session was adjourned at 10:44 P.M.

 

 

 

 

______________________________

                                                                                                      Ramon M. Hache, Sr.                              

                                                                                                                        Mayor                          

 

______________________________

              Donna M. Jackson

           Deputy Village Clerk

  • Hits: 46

A REGULAR WORK SESSION OF THE VILLAGE COUNCIL OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD HELD IN THE SYDNEY V. STOLDT, JR. COURT ROOM OF THE RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE HALL, 131 NORTH MAPLE AVENUE, RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY ON AUGUST 7, 2019 AT 7:30 P.M.

 

  1. CALL TO ORDER – OPEN PUBLIC MEETINGS ACT – ROLL CALL – FLAG     SALUTE

 

Mayor Hache called the meeting to order at 7:30 P.M. and read the Statement of Compliance with the Open Public Meetings Act.  At roll call the following were present: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Walsh, and Mayor Hache.  Also present were Heather Mailander, Village Manager/Village Clerk; Donna Jackson, Deputy Village Clerk; and Matthew Rogers, Village Attorney. Councilman Voigt was absent.

 

Mayor Hache led those in attendance in the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag as well as in a Moment of Silence to honor the brave men and women serving in our armed forces and all our first responders, as well as Judy Caruso, beloved nurse at Travell School for over 20 years who passed away recently.

 

  1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

 

Ronald A. Rozenweig, Woodfield Realty, 4 Wilsey Square, stated he was here tonight because there was something on the agenda which he believes has been removed, which was for the Village to remove two of the four 15 minute parking spaces on the eastbound side of West Ridgewood Avenue.  He was at the meeting on behalf of his tenants who are greatly concerned about the impact this would have on the viability of their businesses.  Five of the tenants are concerned because they have small businesses which rely on in and out businesses, such as Puzo’s Pizza, Davis Surgical Supply, The Wine Seller, West Side Bagel, and Pazzazed.  They are all concerned about the loss of business and the viability of their businesses with the loss of those parking spaces.  Mr. Rozenweig added that the right hand turn lane is rarely used anyway, and most people coming to that intersection are taking a left to come into town, so removing those two parking spaces makes no sense.  There are other solutions which are easily available and would leave those four parking spaces which are the only four parking spaces on that whole block and are the ones that those businesses rely on. 

 

Lee Warren, 140 Washington Place, stated that she came home from vacation to come to this meeting because she was made aware of the taking away of parking on West Ridgewood Avenue.  She wants to be sure the Village was aware of how much these businesses that surround these parking spots give back to our community.  They support Lax Day, Ridgewood Jamboree, baseball events, Graydon swim team, Ridgewood High School swim team, and other events.  She asked if the reason they were going to take away two fifteen minute spaces was because someone in Ridgewood was impatient and wants to make a right, but can’t.  Ms. Warren added that it was absurd, and she was worried about the businesses as well as the children who cross at these intersections to go into town.  She suggested that with the right on red, which is the right of way for the cross walk people; it might be more dangerous for those walking across the street.

 

Ms. Warren stated that between 9 and 11 there were 19 people who used those parking spots, no one longer than seven minutes, on the most deserted week in Ridgewood.  This is a very busy parking area and we cannot afford to take those spots away from the townspeople and the businesses that are trying to stay afloat.  She also asked if the bike lane was disappearing.

 

Tom Shanley, proprietor of The Wine Seller, 6 West Ridgewood Avenue, stated that he has been in this store for five years and sees this intersection every day.  The last thing that the Village Council needs to do is to increase speeds in that area.  He has seen cars hitting cars, cars hitting school buses, and knocking down lampposts.  The lights that were put on the bicycle rack got knocked over twice.  If anything, something needs to be done to make it safer.  People who park across the street are going to be crossing West Ridgewood Avenue with the light red, and there will now be a third lane of traffic zipping through to make the right on red.  Mr. Shanley said that within a year they would have a big serious injury there, not to mention that during the school year between 3:00 P.M. and 4:00 P.M. that sidewalk is full of kids horsing around.  Now, there are going to be cars flying down hugging that curb while the kids are playing around.  He asked the Village Council why it was dropped from the agenda this evening.

 

Mark Berchardi, Westside Bagels, 2 Wilsey Square, stated that he has owned Westside Bagels for eleven years and those parking spots are the lifeblood of his business.  The average customer that comes into his store spends less than ten minutes in the store.  They park there and some park across the street, but most don’t because they have to wait to cross at the light.  Taking away two of those spots at any time of the day will significantly impact his business.  He stated that the last thing this Village can afford is to have any open real estate in the downtown area.  Between 3:00 P.M. and 4:00 P.M. during the school year is one of the busiest parts of his day.  He has kids from GW who walk to his store every day to get a snack after school. Also, to increase the traffic flow in that area is very dangerous.  Mr. Berchardi asked that the Village Council consider the comments that have been put before them tonight.  He added that he has signatures of 75 customers who have signed a petition asking the Village not to remove those parking spots.

 

Jenny Shanley, The Wine Seller, 6 West Ridgewood Avenue, stated that she is a logical person and this just isn’t logical to her.  She asked if the Village Council took an aerial view of what that intersection looks like, as it doesn’t make sense to her that taking away those two spots would actually alleviate what the Village is trying to do.  She thinks they would have to take all four spots away to make it work.  She added that it is West Ridgewood Avenue, not Route 17, and asked if this was something that they were going to do throughout Ridgewood.  Across the street at the train station they took down trees, grass, and green area to create more parking spots which is an ongoing battle in Ridgewood.  Pedestrian safety is going to be the biggest issue of all, as they would like to keep the kids, pedestrians, and visitors who come to town spend their money here, safely.

 

Phil Dolce, 625 Kingsbridge Lane, stated that on behalf of the residents on the East side of the Village, he wanted to thank the Village Council for not turning the Schedler property into a 90 foot baseball field with lights, refreshment stands and overwhelming traffic.  He thanked the Village Council for planting trees along the historic Saddle River Road and Route 17.  Mr. Dolce thanked the Village Council for recognizing the historic value of the Schedler House.  The house already is listed on the Village Master Plan as an historic home and is eligible for National and State listing for its historic value.  As soon as an archaeological evaluation is finished he is sure it will be on National and State registers.  This historic Schedler House is in disrepair, but only because of eight years of neglect by the previous Village Manager and the previous Council majority.  The house was livable when it was purchased originally.  Local neighbors on the east side have already spent $10,000 of their own money since 2009 to prevent the house from further ruin by putting on tarps and are prepared to put up even more money to aid in the restoration or use of the house.  This is their dedication as it is important. 

 

Mr. Dolce thanked the Village Council for understanding the significant negative effects that closing the Glen School had on residents of the east side.  Closing that school was absolutely devastating, not only because it affected property values and students, but it injured the sense of community that only a school gives to a local area.  Therefore, the Schedler House and the property are the only way of restoring the sense of community in that area.  Finally, he thanked the Village Council for realizing that the residents of the east side are not second class citizens, but tax paying residents that deserve equal treatment with the rest of the Village.  There are 568 homes that pay over $9 million in taxes, but they do not have the facilities that are given to the middle of town.

 

Kathryn Schmidt, 123 South Irving Street, stated that she wanted to continue some of the themes here.  She is a huge fan of 15 minute parking spaces as the convenience of running in and out is really important.  She added that she is very supportive of increasing parking as much as they can and she echoed the sentiments of others asking why the Village Council would remove these spaces.  This is not Route 17 or the Thruway, so she hoped that they could preserve those parking spaces.

 

Ms. Schmidt added that she is very supportive of Schedler, but when she saw the price tag she was shocked.  She asked that they make sure that there is a good roof over the top of it before they spend all of this money, but she thinks they are going in the right direction.  She added that she would like to see the topic of Air Babb come up again, as she thinks there is a way that it can be done without bothering neighbors.  Finally, she gets a lot of her information about what is going on by reading the blogs and Facebook pages, and that it has become so obvious that what you say matters and she continues to be amazed at the language that is being used.  At the end of the day it is not helping to bring our community together, which is not the way we should be acting.  She added that she hopes that on all levels they can tone down the rhetoric.

 

Anne Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that she would like to know if it would be possible in the week or so after Graydon closes before the water is drained, if there could be a dog day at Graydon.  She added that she thinks it would be wonderful as the parks were recently opened to dogs, and perhaps an exception could be made of a one day event at Graydon.  It is her recollection that in the week or so after Graydon closes, there is a Village employee party at Graydon, so obviously it would not be that day.  Ms. Loving added that she wasn’t sure if she should ask Ms. Bigos or the Village Manager, but she thinks it would be a nice thing and she would like to put that request in.

 

There were no additional comments from the public.

 

Mayor Hache stated that he wanted to answer some of the questions and clarify the doubts.  There were some questions as to why the issue came up and why it was removed.  He would like to remind everyone that just because they discuss something, they are not deciding for or against something.  The item was pulled from the agenda at the last meeting because they had looked at some of the language because it was ambiguous.  Those two spots don’t actually exist and were never voted on by the Village Council.  He asked that it be removed from this agenda, as having it during the summer when there is the lowest amount of traffic going through that intersection would be a disservice.  He wanted to get input from the businesses and residents about that intersection.  Standing on that corner today would give a very different picture than what he would see in September.

 

Mayor Hache stated that the dog day at Graydon is a neat idea and he would imagine it would involve suspending of their ordinance.  Ms. Mailander stated that it would.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the issue of the two parking spaces was removed from the agenda because the Village Council can’t hold a public hearing to remove two parking spaces either way because the spots legally don’t exist.  If there is no ordinance that created those parking spaces they can’t rescind it because it just is not there.  The beauty of this process is that the businesses were all notified and have opportunity to come here this evening and voice their concerns.  They will have to go back now and revisit the spaces and go through a process to introduce those two parking spaces as an ordinance and then hold a public hearing for or against adopting that ordinance.  They have to go back to square one and create those spaces.  This is something that obviously they have to revisit and this Village Council is one of the most businesses friendly Village Council’s that she has seen in a very long time.

 

Mayor Hache stated that they can’t meet to remove something that doesn’t exist, but they would have to formally meet to have those spaces exist legally.  There is no ordinance to establish them, so they can’t rescind them, but they would have to create an ordinance to have them established legally.

 

  1. MANAGERS REPORT

 

Village Council Public Meeting – Ms. Mailander stated that the next Village Council Public Meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, August 14th at 8:00 P.M.  The next meeting after that will be the September 4th Work Session at 7:30 P.M.

 

Hudson Street Parking Lot – Ms. Mailander stated that she wanted to be sure that residents know that the Hudson Street Parking Lot will be closing on Monday, August 19th due to the construction of the new parking deck.  There have been signs up since last week in the parking lot but they are trying to spread the word as much as they can.  A groundbreaking ceremony for the parking garage will take place on September 7th at 9:00 A.M. and everyone is invited to attend.

 

Ash Trees – Ms. Mailander stated that several Ash trees on the Dayton Street side of Memorial Park at Van Neste Square have been examined and evaluated and have been found to be in decline.  For public safety reasons these trees are scheduled to be removed next week, weather permitting.

 

Note Sale – Ms. Mailander stated that yesterday there was a note sale and they sold $32,727,000 of notes, consisting of $15,197,000 bond anticipation notes, $17,000,000 Water Utility bond anticipation notes, and $530,000 Parking Utility bond anticipation notes.  This sale generated money for new projects of approximately $5,700,000 of general capital, and $6,860,000 of Water Utility capital.  The balance of the funds is used to roll over existing notes.  There were four bidders, TD Securities, Bank of New York, Oppenheimer and Company, and Jeffries.  TD Securities was the successful bidder by a very narrow margin with an annual interest rate of 1.75% and a variable interest cost of 1.309%.  This is the lowest net interest cost for short term borrowing our bond council has seen this year.  Bob Rooney will be working with Acacia to determine the amount and timing of future long and short term borrowing.

 

Bergen Bites Back! – Ms. Mailander stated that especially after heavy rains, please clean drains and gutters. Keep swimming pools adequately treated and please remove standing water.  It only takes seven days for mosquitos to grow and your efforts make a difference for everyone.

 

Healthbarn – Ms. Mailander stated that Healthbarn just completed its annual inspection by the New Jersey Department of Health Consumer, Environmental and Occupational Health Service and continues to be accredited by National Nutrition Education Standards and by adhering to National Safety Standards. 

 

Children’s Sensory and Butterfly Garden – Ms. Mailander stated that the Children’s Sensory and Butterfly Garden behind The Stable is currently in full bloom, and she encouraged people to come and visit.

 

“The Great Swamp: NJ’s Natural Heritage” – Ms. Mailander stated that this is a lecture by NJ photojournalist Jim Del Giudice and will take place Monday, August 12th in the Anne Zusy Youth Lounge from 10:00 A.M. to 11:30 A.M.  The history of the 7,000 acres that comprise the great swamp has been integral to the Passaic Valley Watershed.  Admission is $5 and registration is required.

 

Graydon Pool – Ms. Mailander reminded everyone that Graydon Pool is open daily from 10:00 A.M. to 7:30 P.M.  Late season hours begin on August 12th, weekday hours will be noon to 7:30 P.M. and weekdays/holidays 10:00 A.M. to 7:30 P.M.

 

Art Exhibit at The Stable – Ms. Mailander stated that the art exhibit entitled “Inside Small Works” there will be an artist reception on August 8th from 7:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.

 

Kasschau Memorial Shell – Ms. Mailander stated that tomorrow’s performance at the Kasschau Memorial Shell located on Veterans Field behind the Library, will be the last performance of the season, and the programs begins at 8:30 P.M.

 

Camps for Village Youth – Ms. Mailander stated that for the remainder of the summer there will be a wide variety of camps available for Village youth.  Skateboarding, golf, pony share, summer STEM, and lacrosse.

 

Ridgewood Guild – Ms. Mailander stated that the Ridgewood Guild provides free Movies under the Stars on Wednesday nights.  This evening was supposed to be The Sixth Sense, but due to the rain it was postponed until tomorrow night.  If it rains tomorrow night it will be screened on Wednesday August 14th.  The film will begin at approximately 8:30 P.M.  There is one additional movie, ET, on August 21st.  Bring a chair or a blanket and enjoy the show.

 

Chamber of Commerce Annual Car Show – Ms. Mailander stated that the Chamber of Commerce Annual Car Show will be around Memorial Park at Van Neste Square on Friday, September 6th from 6:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.  There is no rain date, and trophies are at 8:30 P.M.

 

Farmers Market – Ms. Mailander stated that the Farmers Market is open every Sunday through October 27th on the West Side of the Train Station from 9:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M.  She encouraged people to come and meet the farmers.  The Ridgewood Farmers Market is a real farmers market and is brought to us by the members of the Ridgewood Chamber of Commerce.

 

Bergen County Utilities Authority – Ms. Mailander stated that there is a free recycling event on Saturday, August 17th from 9:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. at Bergen Community College.  They will collect old tires, computers, and electronics.  And there is a mobile paper shredding truck that will be there.  This event is rain or shine and requires proof of residency.

 

Mayors Wellness Festival – Ms. Mailander stated that the Mayor’s Wellness Festival is slated for Sunday, September 22nd from 11:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. in Memorial Park at Van Neste Square.  All local health, medical, fitness and wellness providers are invited to participate.  This year there will be a healthy food court and a picnic area.

 

  1. COUNCIL REPORTS

 

Historic Preservation Commission – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Historic Preservation Commission is canceled for tomorrow evening.

 

Planning Board – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Planning Board met last night and went over their new by-laws that should be adopted two meetings from now.  Mayor Hache added that they swore in Allison Wesner as the new Class 4 member of the Planning Board last night.

 

Master Plan Advisory Board Meeting – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they met last night and Neil Desai of NV5 reviewed the results of the Visioning Process with the committee.  They had invited some members of the public to join them, and it was interesting that it came up in the visioning results of the survey that many folks are uncomfortable with the rhetoric on social media as it relates to Ridgewood topics and they feel that it can be taken down a few notches.  They also had the opportunity to hear from the new planner and they were concerned about historic preservation throughout the Village and the Schedler House.  The planner gave them a road map for both private and public property as to how they can do a better job preserving historic structures throughout the Village and those that many feel give the charming character and history to the Village.

 

Car Show – Councilwoman Walsh added that if anyone had vehicles that they think would be worthy of the show you can get an application with the Chamber of Commerce on their website.

 

Hudson Street Parking Garage – Mayor Hache stated that the Village Manager, Village Engineer, Deputy Mayor, and himself took a drive out to Denver, Pennsylvania last week to visit the company that is preparing the precast concrete for the Hudson Street Parking structure and had a tour of the facility and saw the quality of the construction of the pieces that will be assembled here.  They have officially signed off on the materials and the colors that they will use and they are moving forward.  The groundbreaking is September 7th but the lot actually goes under construction August 19th

 

Councilwoman Knudsen added that CFO, Bob Rooney, joined them on the visit to Hyde Concrete and they had an opportunity to view an augmented reality version of our structure through a holo- lens and see the garage in a lot of dimensions.  They will receive a copy of that video and will get as much of that information online as possible.  There is a lot of video and pictures of how they pour and create the concrete pieces.

 

Mayor Hache stated that for the groundbreaking ceremony on September 7th, Table at Latonas has generously offered to provide coffee and continental breakfast of everyone afterwards.

 

Central Business District Advisory Committee – Mayor Hache stated that CBDAC is meeting tomorrow.

 

125th Anniversary – Mayor Hache stated that the 125th Anniversary Committee met this week and were celebrating the fact that they were moving forward with the Ridgewood Community Foundation which is a 501(c)3 organization that will help to promote a lot of activities in town and will help fund the activities of the boards and committees.  This is a good opportunity for those committees to raise money.  The 125th Anniversary Gala will take place on November 2nd at Events by Felina, which should be opening in October.

 

  1. DISCUSSION

 

  1. Budget

 

  1. Schedler House Rehabilitation

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they went out for bids which were higher than the amount they had appropriated.  These are prequalified bidders because it is an historic structure.  It was rebid on August 1st and the Village received three bids.  They bid package requested bids for three items and using the aggregate, Dell-Tech of Trenton was the lowest bidder at $1,126,250.  The Village currently doesn’t have that total amount available; however, there are options as to how they would like to award this because it was bid as A, B, and C.

 

Tom Connolly, Principal Architect of Connolly and Hickey Historical Architects, stated that they are the firm that prepared the contract documents for the interior and exterior restoration of the Zabriskie-Schedler House, and prepared some of the historical reports which enabled some of the grants that the Village received from Bergen County.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they have a fiduciary obligation to taxpayer dollars, but also are stewards of our resources and our historic grounds and structures.  So, they want to make sure they get this right and she was interested in understanding his perspective of how the price tag went from $7-800,000 to the $1.1 million.  Mr. Connolly stated that their estimates were completed in 2016 and before any contract documents were prepared.  So, maybe they didn’t understand the full scope of the work.  A larger part of the issue is the economy.  He received a letter from another contractor that it is a super-hot economy; costs have skyrocketed; and everybody is busy.  The last time they did see something like this was in 2005 or 2006, when estimates for this type of work meant nothing.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if the prequalification process affects this.  Mr. Connolly stated that their pool of contractors that they can pull from for restoration has to comply with the Secretary of the Interior Standards for Rehabilitation of Historic Properties.  It says they have to guide the restoration process.  There are a few qualified contractors in the State that can perform this work.  New contractors get qualified in the State, but it is a process.

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that typically when you see estimates, you see general requirements.  What is glaring on these three is that one person has $106,000 and the next bid is $10,000.  She is trying to determine what the Dell-Tech bids are.  Mr. Connolly stated that it is unfortunate that they have to break things down this way, but they know the contractors and how they put bids together.  Looking at the bottom line, they are generally close to where they are. When they put the bid together, they put money all over the place.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that the challenge they see all the time is Change Orders.  She wondered if the low bidder would request a Change Order to bring a low estimate up to the correct amount.  Mr. Connolly stated that they go through these bids line by line and understand what these contractors include and felt that Dell-Tech’s bid was right on.  Councilwoman Walsh reiterated that the last thing they want are Change Orders.  Mr. Connolly stated that they typically allow for unforeseen conditions in restoration work of about 10% to 15%, but they are already over that right off the bat.

 

Councilwoman Walsh asked if their bid would then correlate with the descriptions.  So, if they look at the price for finishes, it will be defined that they can’t come back and describe something else.  Mr. Connolly stated that they are required to do what is in the contract documents, and there is no way he will allow them to not complete something if it is in black and white.  Unforeseen conditions exist, but they have unit prices in the project for things such as that.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that was her biggest concern because they were so variant.  Mr. Connolly stated that they get this question a lot and it is unfortunate that they have to break it down this way, but they put their money in different locations in the breakdown. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh asked if they could sign a guaranteed price with the contractors as they did with the parking garage.  Mayor Hache stated that it was a guaranteed maximum price, and then they work out a split between the difference of the GMP and the cost.  Mr. Connolly stated that whatever ends up on the contract document or the specifications is what you receive.  Even if there are unforeseen items or the architects miss, you receive what is on the contract documents.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she would like to see what that list is.  Mr. Connolly stated that they have that.  There is a schedule on the drawings.  Councilwoman Walsh asked if they were agreeing with their price for that.  Mr. Connolly agreed with that.

 

Councilman Sedon stated that it is sectioned off in project A, B, and C, and asked if Mr. Connolly could explain what that entails.  Mr. Connolly stated that they broke it up to get the project underway and to use some of the grant money they have.  They are hoping that the Village can get another grant in the future and most likely they would.  Historically once you start down the process of receiving grants, the granting agency likes to see the project through.  The goal is to get the building envelope project underway with A; B is the restrooms; and C is the finishes.  Councilman Sedon stated that finishes appear in project A, B, and C and when adding up all the work it, comes out pretty similar for all of the contractors.  There was some discussion on finishes, and Mr. Connolly stated that he wouldn’t try to dissect it that much but he knows how much these things cost.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they were just to move full steam ahead, how long would Mr. Connolly estimate this might take.  Mr. Connolly stated that it is going to take a year, maybe a little less depending on the contractor.  They just completed a full interior restoration in Clifton and it took a full year.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked how long it would take to do the exterior building envelope.  Mr. Connolly stated that it would take less than six months.  Councilwoman Knudsen cited what Dr. Dolce said during his public comment.  She added that the residents on the east side of town have been living with the house in this condition for more than a decade and it is fundamentally unfair to our fellow residents who live in that neighborhood.  She added that it is important that they get this moved forward and can see at least a polished exterior so that the neighbors have a sense of comfort that the neighborhood is what it should be.

 

Mayor Hache thanked Mr. Connolly for coming tonight and added that he has been a supporter of the Schedler property and house.  His concern here is that when they looked at the original estimate, they were looking at something in the neighborhood of project B and they were now 60% to 80% higher than the original estimate.  In the course of time, they are acting and basing their decisions on certain assumptions.  Ms. Mailander stated they have the original estimates and she would share that with the Village Council after Mayor Hache completed his comments.  Mayor Hache stated that his concern is that to begin the project they are 60% to 80% higher and haven’t put one shovel in the ground and as they know now, it always costs more than the estimate.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the original estimate was broken into two phases and then with the asbestos the total project was estimated to $784,800.  They currently have applied for three rounds of grants through Bergen County Historic Preservation.  Phase 1 was the roof stabilization and planning documents.  The grant amount was $116,724 which is a 50/50 matching grant.  Phase 2A was exterior stabilization and interior rehabilitation and that was a total cost of $400,000 so it was $200,000 for each of the grant and the Village.  Phase 2B was the interior rehabilitation which was estimated at $151,300 so that was $75,650 for the grant and the Village each.  It is a total of $392,375 from the Village and from the grants which equals the $784,750.  Ms. Mailander stated that as Mr. Connolly stated, part of the reason that it has increased so dramatically is that they are busy.  The material costs have gone up between 8% and 40% not concluding the tariffs that have effecting lighting and HVAC.  Material costs keep changing; contractors are building in larger buffers in their budget due to prevailing wage as well.  The minimum wage is going up and that affects prevailing wage which the Village is required to pay.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they can apply for more grants next year, and so they currently have enough money to do A and C which is exterior and ADA improvements, or they can do A or C, and then go out for additional grants next year for the interior of the house.  This is up to the Village Council.  Mayor Hache stated that looking at the 25% tariff and the increases on minimum wage; he still doesn’t understand the increase 60% to 80% above the original estimate.  He thinks they are padding their numbers and better sharpen their pencils.  Mr. Connolly stated that they rebid the project and re-did the scope and the cost of the project didn’t come down that much.  Their estimates were done prior to doing the contract documents and his partner who does the estimates is a certified cost estimator with the State of NJ.  She is typically very good at putting estimates together for restoration, but they found in this economy, it is one of four projects that they have in the same predicament.

 

Councilman Sedon asked if there was anything that Mr. Connolly would see going through that would greatly increase the cost.  Mr. Connolly stated that the greatest thing was the asbestos, adding that it was not unusual for projects of this type to have change orders but if they do, they are usually minor in the $100s or just a thousand dollars and are for minor things.  They are doing all the structure, which is part of the project; the barrier free component is in there.  Light safety and electrical are on there, but he can’t see through walls.  They assumed a few things for the structure.  Mayor Hache asked what percentage of the project cost is labor.  Mr. Connolly said that he couldn’t tell off the top of his head, but he could get that for the Village Council.  He added that would it be in the general requirements number and probably percentage wise.  They do have a contingency for each phase, so the project could come in less than 1% if all goes well.  Mr. Connolly stated that it was approximately 13% if he took their general requirements and he doesn’t know what else they have in there that could be scaffolding and other things.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they were to award project A and project C and move forward, could they actually go out and rebid project B.  Mr. Connolly stated of course.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that if they started to do the exterior work and they get that started. Then the biggest hit is on that project B anyway, so they could back out and rebid that.  It is quite possible that there is a change in that pool of available prequalified contractors to choose from and it is also possible that economic conditions will change somewhat.  They will have to roll the dice that it doesn’t actually come back higher, which is one of the options that is available, as well.  Mr. Connolly stated that would narrow it and he would recommend rebidding project B and narrowing the scope.  With project B you are focused on just the interior.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that at this point they have a resolution to award if the Village Council would like to, but they could also put it off until September.  There was a consensus between Councilwoman Knudsen and Councilman Sedon that they were ready to move forward with project A and C.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she felt like she wanted to go back and take a look as she doesn’t remember seeing a line item for all of the items, and asked when they received that.  Ms. Mailander stated that she didn’t know if they ever got it.  Mr. Connolly stated that there is no actual breakdown of the contract documents which are architectural plans and you are getting what’s on those drawings.  Councilwoman Walsh asked if they could get this on the next agenda.  Ms. Mailander stated that would be September 4th.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she wanted to review all of the data a little bit more. 

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the problem she now sees is that they will have not awarded the contract which is an issue of timing because they want to get a roof on the building finally, after years of tarps at the expense of the generosity of our residents.  She asked if it was an issue of timing if the contract isn’t awarded and they wait until September.  Mr. Connolly stated that since they first started drafting the documents until now, the deterioration of the building has accelerated and it will continue to do so.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that this is an issue of the neighborhood and community and she would like to move forward at this point.  Mayor Hache stated that the concern is how they got from $700,000 to $1.2 million.  His fear is that they start digging and they find more problems that add to the cost.  He added that he was willing to commit to a guaranteed maximum price.  Mr. Connolly stated that was what the contractor was doing by signing the contract as they are obligated to do what’s on the contract documents, which is the restoration of the house.  Mayor Hache asked what the profit margin is of the project.  Mr. Connolly stated that he didn’t know.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they could discuss it again on September 4th and in the meantime they could have a Special Public Meeting that evening.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they could wait until September, but that wasn’t changing the price.  Mr. Connolly stated that they were obligated to hold their price for X amount of days.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that whether they do this at this point or September, the price isn’t changing.  So, the only thing at question is whether or not they are willing to spend this money for this historic preservation.  As Dr. Dolce pointed out, the community has nothing since the Glen School closed, but the price point doesn’t change until September, they are going to lose another month before getting this project moving, the deterioration is accelerating, and she doesn’t see the price changing. 

 

Mayor Hache stated that it isn’t a matter of price but where is the funding as they were working under particular assumptions.  Mr. Connolly stated that it wasn’t unusual for this to happen.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the funding is in place for A and C.  Mayor Hache stated that they were funding for a particular estimated cost, and that means that now the funding falls short of the cost of the project. So, how does that gap get filled.  Ms. Mailander stated that they could go for grants again next year and can bond.  Mr. Connolly stated that historically, once you start down the path with grants and are awarded grants they tend to see the project through and this is not uncommon for the cost to increase as you move forward with a restoration.  Mayor Hache stated that he agreed with Councilwoman Walsh and wanted to look at this further. 

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked when the next public meeting is.  Ms. Mailander stated that it was Wednesday.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they could have the information being requested by Tuesday next week.  Mr. Connolly stated that they could have it tomorrow.  Councilwoman Knudsen said that they should put it on the agenda for Wednesday, August 14th.  She thinks the residents in that neighborhood are entitled to see this come to some conclusion as quickly as possible, and she thinks that the residents are owed at least some modicum of expediency.  Mayor Hache added that he thinks the residents are owed a bit more diligence on this because they don’t have all of the information.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked when everyone got the packets.  Ms. Mailander stated that the information with the questions and answers was handing out this evening.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked about A, B, and C.  Ms. Mailander stated that it was last week.  Councilman Sedon stated that they should wait until everyone feels more comfortable.  They need a resolution to this but he thinks that people need to feel comfortable one way or another and more time is required for that.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that at some point; you drag your feet for a decade; and here we are tonight with an opportunity to change the trajectory of where this is leading; and she suggested adding to the agenda for next week.

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that she understands the lowest bidder on concrete estimated $11,000 while the other two received the same specs and came out to $48,520 and $52,500.  She asked if their guy underbid to get the job and then they are going to get a change order.  Mr. Connolly stated that they were not going to get a change order, as he is required to do the work laid out.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that was the piece that she didn’t feel that she had a handle on.  Mr. Connolly stated that by taking a look at line item 5, you will see there are variations there.  As well, you can’t look at these breakdowns because they throw numbers all over the place.  This is meant more for the architects because they understand how it works.  There was some additional discussion about the concrete work. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that the estimates are all over the place, and she asked what the true estimates are line by line because they do so many change orders a year.  Ms. Mailander stated that they do several change orders a year, but asked if Councilwoman Walsh was saying that the only time they would have a change order on this bid is if she found something that wasn’t on this bid.  Mr. Connolly stated that as long as it’s on his drawings they are obligated to install it.  Ms. Mailander and Mr. Connolly were in agreement that the contractors are bound by those numbers to do whatever is stipulated on those drawings.  Ms. Mailander added that in her mind, the only time there was going to be a change order is if they encounter something in a wall that they didn’t realize was there.  Mr. Connolly agreed, but added that you would have to look at the contract documents to understand the project but it is all there. 

 

Ms. Mailander asked Mr. Connolly if he had some sort of estimate or cost breakdown in his mind of what he thought each item was going to cost.  Mr. Connolly stated that in his mind he didn’t prepare that, but it should be his original estimate.  Ms. Mailander clarified that it was the overall number and not line by line.  Mr. Connolly stated that looking at Dell Tech’s line items for specialties he has $0 but in the specifications it is for soap dispensers in the rest room, so he may have put that in another line which is a communication problem, but it is on their drawings and he is required to include those items.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she understood the documents and that they were using a computer system that probably assigned the values.  The contractors involved here are prequalified and so it is a very specialized area and the way they are breaking this out is probably very different than for your house. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that she doesn’t think it is very different from a house, and asked them to show her where the doorknobs and hinges are.  Mr. Connolly stated that there are about 40 pages of drawings, so there is no list as it is graphic.  Councilwoman Walsh asked where they are placing these items if not under specialties as Mr. Connolly had mentioned.  Mr. Connolly stated that it was on the contract documents and they are obligated to install everything that is on his contract documents. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh addressed the Village Attorney, Mr. Rogers, and asked if they sign off on anything like this other than the unforeseen, how they would protect the Village so that they can’t come back with any changes.  Mr. Connolly stated that was why the Village hired him so that he can make sure that they are doing everything that is on those contract documents.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that Mr. Connolly wasn’t the one that is guaranteeing what they are putting out.  Mr. Connolly stated that he was guaranteeing that they are installing what’s on those drawings, so if it’s not on his drawings it doesn’t get installed.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she understands that, but for her, if they are saying concrete work is $11,000 and there is no other concrete work being done and for the other bidders to have it four times as much she can’t see that.  Mr. Connolly stated that they should take the whole list away from the Village Council and just look at the bottom line because they are all right on top of one another and it is hard to dissect their numbers.

 

Councilwoman Walsh asked Mr. Rogers what the protections are that they can put in place legally for this to happen.  Mr. Rogers stated that it sounds like the protections are in the contract documents, but if there was a challenge to the price and a request for a change order or some other type of deviation, or change in terms of the work that is to be performed, they would have to look to the documents to try and identify where the particular issue is.  Just like any other contract that has detail to it; they are obligated to perform on accordance with their bid that was accepted.  Their experience is that there are deviations sometimes, and the detail on this is much more significant than you would normally find.  They have had some historic preservation work in the past with the train station plaza, and there were some issues with those but they may not have been as detailed in terms of the specifications.  You rely on those things to ensure that they are as sound as you can possibly get and you do whatever you can to protect it.

 

Mr. Connolly stated that he works for the Village and he is going to make sure that what is on those drawings is what the Village is going to get for that cost.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that Mr. Connolly would get that information to the Village Council tomorrow and then they would add it to next week’s agenda.

 

Councilman Sedon made a motion to suspend the Work Session and convene a Special Public Meeting.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        Councilman Voigt

ABSTAIN:      None

 

  1. SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETING - SEE SEPARATE MINUTES

 

Mayor Hache called for a motion to adjourn, there was a motion by Councilman Sedon to adjourn the Special Public Meeting and reconvene the Work Session.   Mayor Hache seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        Councilman Voigt

ABSTAIN:      None

 

  1. DISCUSSION

 

  1. Ridgewood Water

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – 2020 Ford Escape

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is a resolution in the amount is $26,349 for the purchase of a 2020 Ford Escape through the Sourcewell Cooperative Pricing National Auto Fleet Group of Watsonville, California.  It will replace resolution 19-158 which was adopted on June 12, 2019.  The date to order a 2019 model had expired so this is for a 2020 model.  Mayor Hache asked about the difference in price between the Police Department vehicles and the Water Department vehicle.  Ms. Mailander stated that she was told that the floor mats and the cargo mat made the difference in the price, but she would confirm that.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that the sticker price may be one thing, but they may be getting a discount.  Mayor Hache stated that $1,500 was too much for the floor and cargo mats that they were proposing on the police vehicles.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would figure out the pricing and let the Village Council know.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Pumps and Motors – Repair, Replacement and Installation – NSI Neal Systems

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this resolution is to purchase items related to the maintenance of pumps and motors and to award it under the North Jersey Wastewater Cooperative Pricing Systems of Newtown, PA not to exceed $26,000.  The materials are for the calibration of meters.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Pumps and Motors – Repair, Replacement and Installation – Universal Electric Motor

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for state purchase from Universal Electric Motor of Hackensack.  This is not to exceed $20,000 and is for repair and replacement of electric pumps and is under the North Jersey Wastewater Cooperative Pricing System.

 

  1. Parking

 

  1. Request for Loading Zone at Train Station

 

Ms. Mailander stated that there is a request for the loading zone at the Train Station.  The Village has an agreement with a vendor to operate the coffee stand at the Train Station, and that person recently received a ticket while setting up for the day’s customers early one morning.  The vendor’s employee did not have a parking permit nor would they qualify for one as they are not a Ridgewood resident.  There is a picture where there is a space that is not striped as a parking stall, so they are recommending that this be designated as a loading zone for the coffee concession stand and later for the deliveries that Social Services receives for its facility.

 

Mayor Hache asked if it would be marked as a loading zone.  Ms. Mailander stated that it would be, and it would be short term as loading zones are.

 

  1. Reserved Parking Spaces at the Train Station

 

Ms. Mailander stated that one reserved parking space is for the New Jersey Transit representative per the agreement with New Jersey Transit.  The other parking space would be for the operator of the concession stand and then Social Services.  The concession stand would have it until 10:30 A.M. and then Social Services would use it after that.

 

Mayor Hache asked if the spaces were in the agreements for the concession stand or Social Services.  Ms. Mailander stated that it wasn’t in their agreements.  Mayor Hache stated that he thought they should consider memorializing this agreement as being part of what is included.  Ms. Mailander stated that in addition to doing this, Mr. Rogers could perhaps write up an agreement for this one space to be shared by Social Services and the concession stand.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked how much of the day they will be using that space.  Ms. Mailander stated that in the loading zone she didn’t know, but this is for a parking space.

 

  1. Request to Amend Parking Ordinance – Monte Vista Avenue

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for Monte Vista Avenue, Park Slope, North Hillside Place, and Madison Place.  The proposed parking changes were sent out to 57 residents of the area and they received 12 responses.  The majority was in favor of the change to 4 hours, but there were some other preferences. 

 

Mayor Hache stated that the reason this was brought to them was with the commuters and he agreed that Saturday wasn’t necessary.  Councilman Sedon stated that there are usually spaces in the Train Station parking lot on Saturday, adding that he would be good with Monday through Friday unless Saturday is a problem in the future.  There is also wide support for four hours which gives enough time for service people and cuts down on confusion if it is throughout the neighborhood.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that inevitably people park in front of your house because it is a public street, and she agreed with the majority regarding Saturday.  Everyone was in agreement about the four hour parking limit.

 

  1. Budget

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Replacement of Carpeting at Several Village Hall Locations

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they re-carpeted several of the rooms in this building, some of them being the court room and several offices.  The next phase of that work will include the Village Clerk’s Office, Assessor’s Office, Violations, Water Department, and Building Department, in an amount not to exceed $44,122.92.  Brothers Flooring of Hackensack is under state contract and they do have this budgeted in the capital budget.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Two 2019 Chevrolet Tahoes – Police Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Police Department placed an order for two 2019 Chevrolet Tahoes with Day Chevrolet under the New Jersey State Purchasing Program.  They had to be ordered before April 15th in order to beat the closing of Chevrolet’s open ordering/production time because the State Contract expired May 1st

 

The Village submitted a Letter of Intent to Purchase contingent on the availability of funds.  The total amount is not to exceed $73,648.08.  There are also other vendors to outfit the cars.  The Tahoes will replace patrol cars #15 and #21, which are 2015 Ford Explorers and have exceeded their usable time as police cars.  Some of the equipment in those old cars will be used in the new ones.

 

Regional Communications will be used for emergency light and police car equipment supply and installation, and Motorola Solutions for multi-band car radios.  These are three separate resolutions.

 

  1. Award Contract – Change Order No. 1 – Train Station Parking Expansion

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they expanded the Train Station parking and realized it was a good time to complete several sections of the Gamewell fiber optic communications cable since it will be needed in the new parking garage.  They also relocated the traffic signal pole to improve the site radius as well as connected the signal’s electric supply to a meter circuit.  When it came time to resurface the lot it became apparent additional asphalt and milling was necessary.  The change order is in the amount of $64,361.95.  She pointed out that even with the change order it is still $69,000 less than the second lowest bidder.

 

  1. Declare Surplus – Police Department/Parking Enforcement – Two Ford Crown Victoria’s

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this resolution was to declare property surplus for two Police Department 2011 Ford Crown Victoria’s.  They are in need of repairs with estimated costs exceeding the value of the vehicles, including the engine and air conditioning.  The expense to repair them exceeds the value of the vehicles, so they will be declared surplus.

 

  1. Parking Capital Bond Ordinance – Two Ford Escapes – Police Department/Parking Enforcement

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they need to write a bond ordinance for this, in the amount of $57,000 which will introduce and then they can award the contract after the adoption and effective date.

 

  1. General Capital Bond Ordinance – Purchase of Ford F350 Pickup – Traffic & Signal Division & 2019 Ford Ranger – Parks

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the purchase of the Ford F350 Pickup is for both the Traffic and Signal Division and a 2019 Ford Ranger for the Parks and Recreation Division.  For the Parks and Recreation Division, it is for the Supervisor to perform his day to day operations, transporting personnel and equipment, as well as checking on the condition of parks and fields.  It is a 2019 Ford Ranger through the Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing, National Auto Fleet Group of California, in an amount not to exceed $52,226.

 

The Traffic and Signal Ford F-350 Pickup will be purchased instead of the van that the contract was awarded for previously.  They were told by the Bond Council that they needed a different ordinance for the purchase of these vehicles, because the van is not the same lifespan or type of vehicle as the pickup.  Their recommendation was for a new bond ordinance and when that is adopted they can award both of these contracts.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they knew the year of the van that is being replaced.  Ms. Mailander stated part of it is they are going to add it to snowplowing, as well.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they usually have more information.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would get this information for her. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh asked if they were prohibited as a municipality from having a direct relationship with Ford.  Ms. Mailander stated that they would have to bid it, but that is why they go with State Contract Cooperative Purchasing. Councilwoman Walsh stated that she was asking because her company has contracted with Ford and they get a rebate check back from Ford each year and it is pretty substantial.  Mr. Rogers stated that local public contract law would not allow for that.  The only way they are able to do this so quickly is because Ford has qualified for the State Contract, so they go through that purchasing level rather than bidding it out.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that these prices are more than what she was paying at her company.  Ms. Mailander stated that is what happens with public purchasing, unfortunately.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that sometimes there are differences with heavy duty or special equipment.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that the Village was overpaying for the vehicles.

 

  1. General Capital Bond Ordinance – Re-Appropriating Funds – Purchase of Scarab Windrow Turner

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was re-appropriating funds for the purchase of a scarab windrow turner that is used at the Lakeview Composting Facility.  It is currently non-operational and is well beyond its useful life and repairs would be cost prohibitive.  It was determined that several previously approved Capital projects were no longer required and were completed with excess funds available.  The reappropriation of funds from these projects may be utilized for this purchase. 

 

  1. Increase Fire Prevention Inspection Fees

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Fire Department proposal is to increase the fees which haven’t been increased in eight years and it will put us more in line with other towns in Bergen County.  The State bills for the life hazard building inspections and gives the Village a percentage of the fees they collect.  Life Hazard Building inspections are inspections of bars, BYOB restaurants, and supermarkets.  Most of these increases are minimal.

 

Chief Van Goor stated that both the Fire Department and the State perform inspections.  The State charges and they increased their fees at the beginning of the year.  The Fire Department looked back at the ordinance to see if we had to change the ordinance based on that and realized we hadn’t changed our fees since 2011.  The Fire Department came up with increases because it has been eight years since there were increases. 

 

Inspector Krug stated that they were given leeway with how they wanted to address their fee schedule, and he reached out to towns with populations that are similar or slightly over.  Some of the proposed increases are smoke detector certifications, which they currently charge $75 for.  Recently, as of January 1st, the State has added to the code and increased the Village’s workload with that.  They find that the inspections take a minimum of two visits there, and they are looking to increase the fees to $100 which puts them in line with surrounding towns.  The other inspections that he has are businesses within the business district.  When they are talking about the Life Hazard Uses, BYOB fees are set by the State.  As an inspector, he goes out and performs the inspections and the State collects that fee and then reimburses the town.  Most of the fee changes have to do with mercantile stores, offices and multi-family dwellings. 

 

Instead of billing within the windows of units he would like to have a flat fee of $100 and then bill per number of units on that property.  Inspector Krug stated that he liked having the flat fee because in the past they have been billing a garden apartment complex, with seven buildings, $270 in the past, but if you really think about it, it is seven different structures.  They receive seven different fire alarm test reports, seven different sprinkler reports, and deal with issues in seven different buildings.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it makes sense to her as they are doing multiple works so they are right to approach it that way.  Mayor Hache stated that looking at the changes depending on the size of the business.  As the range of percentage increases going from 13% to 18% with the higher increases at the lower end and then for the mercantile the range of increases is 13% to 25%, and the 25% is at the lower end.  It seems that there is a big disparity there between them, but looking at the fire safety permits it looks pretty consistent.  Mayor Hache asked if they could be more consistent with the increases.  Inspector Krug stated that it was going up $10.  Mayor Hache stated that the percentages were about a 29% increase.  Chief Van Goor stated that those fees are set by the State of New Jersey.  Mayor Hache stated that the standard was applied unevenly and when looking at the fees that the Village is imposing, it’s not consistent.  Inspector Krug stated that there is an option where the Village could introduce an ordinance that says they just follow the State’s inspection fees and go that route.  These types of permits are for special events such as food trucks or a tent on your property.

 

Mayor Hache stated that the increases that are proposed here range from 13% to 18% with 18% at the low end.  Looking at the second category the range is 13% to 25%, and he was asking if there was a way to get the percentage increase more in line.  Inspector Krug stated that they could look at that.  Mayor Hache asked if the consideration was in terms of keeping in line with the dollar increases that the State has.  Inspector Krug stated that it was to keep it in line with other towns, and he would see that discrepancy within the current fees, as well.  He added that when he worked with the Chief he came up with the average increase of 16%, and some of that is just due to rounding out figures.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that looking at the increase at 0-500 square feet, the increase is $10 but looking at a large square footage the increase is $40, and even though that percentage isn’t actually greater, there must be more involved in that particular location.  Mayor Hache asked if it was more work to do a smaller building than a larger one.  Chief Van Goor stated that there is a lot more scheduling involved in smaller inspections, chasing down owners, phone calls, and arranging appointments.  For a larger building, it is easier to meet just a building director.  Mayor Hache stated that then these amounts are not arbitrary, but are correlated to the amount of work that is necessary for those structures.  There was additional discussion about the size of buildings and the percent increase.  Chief Van Goor stated that every inspection is done differently.  The only thing that is uniform is the code that he enforces.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Six Panasonic Tough Books – Police Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that there are several different computer and printer related contracts to award.  This is for six Toughbooks for the Police department.  Wireless Communications is a vendor through state contract, with a cost not to exceed $30,847.80.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Server Upgrade

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for a server upgrade for the E-Ticket program and new Finance Server to replace the current system.  This is under State Contract to Dell of Round Rock, Texas in an amount not to exceed $41,695.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Printer Upgrades and Replacements

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for printer upgrades and replacements for Finance, Water, Engineering, Police, and EMS.  The quote is for 13 printers in total and will be under State Contract to SHI of Somerset, not to exceed $24,079.81.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Ruggedized Switches and Network Upgrades – Various Departments

 

Ms. Mailander stated that ruggedized switches are meant for areas of high and low humidity such as Graydon Pool, Pump Houses, Storage Areas, and Lockboxes.  This is under state contract to SHI of Somerset not to exceed $18,154.60.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Aruba Switches and Network Upgrades – Various Departments

 

Ms. Mailander stated this was to handle the increase of data.  Separate certain data points to elevate possible bottlenecking and increase efficiency on backups by creating a management network.  With the onset of utilizing ip based phones, security cameras, and other node, the increase of bandwidth is needed in order for the network to run at an optimal state.  The current switches are between 4 and 8 years of age and are showing some signs of degradation.  The State Contract is to SHI of Somerset, not to exceed $92,239.14.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Public Access and Wifi Upgrade – Village Facilities and Park Locations

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was for Wifi equipment and to expand coverage in Village facilities/park locations.  This contract is with SHI of Somerset, not to exceed $28,151.00.  Mayor Hache asked if the wifi upgrade was going to include Van Neste Square in the scope.  Mr. Hansen stated that it would.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Renewal of Annual Spatial Data Logic Software License

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for the renewal of spatial data logic software license for one year.  IT is currently used by the Building Department for permits and zoning and the Health Department for pet licensing.  They will be looking into integrating the system into the ESRI Project.  The price for renewal is $31,250 and will be awarded under stated contract to SHI of Somerset.

 

  1. Award Contract – Leaf Collection Services for Area B – Public Works Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they bid out the leaf pickup for Area B and had two planholders eligible to bid and received one bid.  The sole bid was $79,800.00.  The proposal calls for the contractor to make three pickups in section B, collect the leaves, and then transport them to the Lakeview Compost Facility.  The bidder was Faircut Services of Montville, and this is a first year for them.  For the past two years, the contracts were $88,500 and $92,460.  Councilwoman Sedon asked if they were fully aware of the scope of work that’s involved, and asked if there was any way it could go up.  Ms. Mailander stated that they have to do it at this price and do not get a change order.  They also assign an employee to check up on section B to make sure that they are being picked up in a timely manner.  This is a new vendor and they are looking forward to working with them.

 

  1. Declare Surplus – Streets Department – Paving Box

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is to declare a paving box surplus, and then once it is declared surplus it will be sold on GovDeals.com.

 

  1. Resolution Cancelling General Capital Ordinance Balances

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is a resolution cancelling general capital ordinance balances.  The CFO and the Treasurer have revised all general capital bond ordinances, some have been completed or circumstances have changed.  There are balances that are left from purchases that have already been made.  They are going to cancel as shown in the attachment, which will result in a reduction in deferred charges unfunded and monies being restored to the General Capital Fund Balance.

 

  1. Award Professional Services Contract – Professional Planning Consultant

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they were working to correct a diversion of open spaces in the Village of Ridgewood. Topology NJ of Newark was hired last year to provide professional consulting services on this matter.  There is a need to extend this professional agreement to help guide this issue to final resolution with Green Acres.  It will be an amount not to exceed $35,000.  They will prove valuable as the Village moves through the application process, which was recommended by Green Acres.  Once through the application process, ultimately you have to be approved by the State Legislature.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she didn’t understand whether or not they were trying to take a different approach with this as they made applications in good faith and are being held up by this even though the property still went to public use.  She added that she didn’t know where it was written that they could hold this money up, and asked if they looked into that at all.  Mr. Rogers stated that he has not looked into the legality of whether they have the authority to withhold the funding that our taxpayers contribute, but he assumes they would.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that this is something that happened decades ago and here the Village taxpayers are taking a hit. 

 

Mr. Rogers stated that he thought their position was arbitrary in the beginning when they say that the amount of money that was spent on Schedler and Habernickel doesn’t get considered with regard to this because those two events happened long after the property in question and the diversion was utilized.  They thought about challenging it but at that time determined not to and the decision hasn’t been revisited.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they are spending more money here and the taxpayers are still the ones being denied.  Mr. Rogers stated that if it was something she wanted him to do he would be glad to.  There was a consensus among the Village Council.  Ms. Mailander stated that with the consultant they only pay them when they use them.  Councilwoman Knudsen reiterated her sentiments, as if they were acting in good faith and this was pulled out of the blue for the Village to look into and determine if they should be considering other alternatives.

 

  1. Shared Services Agreement – Municipal Court Administrator and Deputy Municipal Court Administrator (Glen Rock)

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Village’s Municipal Court Administrator retired on August 1st.  The Administrative Office of the Courts in Hackensack is strongly encouraging Municipal Courts to create Shared Services Agreements with other Municipal Courts.  The Borough of Glen Rock’s Municipal Court Administrator, Kimberly McWilliams, is currently the Village’s Alternate Municipal Court Administrator.  The Borough of Glen Rock was approached about a Shared Services Agreement with the Village, whereby Glen Rock will provide a Municipal Court Administrator and Ridgewood will provide a Deputy Municipal Court Administrator and the use of our two clerical staff, as well as allow Glen Rock to use the Village’s video conferencing system to communicate with the jails and correctional facilities.  The Borough of Glen Rock has agreed to a Shared Services Agreement as outlined, for a fee of $50,000 a year.  It will allow each municipal court to remain in their respective municipalities.  The Deputy Court Administrator and the two staff may have to be at Glen Rock.  They are looking to start it September 1st.  This also needs an agreement and approval from the Assignment Judge of Bergen County.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that Shared Services are a great thing and the courts in Bergen County will ultimately be forced into sharing.  The Village is looking forward to doing this with Glen Rock.

 

  1. Shared Services Agreement – Floodplain Protection Planning Services (Bergen County)

 

Ms. Mailander stated that in May the Village Council authorized her to execute a Declaration of Interest Form in order to proceed with Floodplain Protection Planning Services.  The Bergen County Freeholders have adopted a resolution to authorize the Shared Services Agreement to have this plan developed through The Land Conservancy of New Jersey and The Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program for the Village, at no cost to the Village.

 

The Village Council now has to adopt a resolution to authorize the Shared Services Agreement, submit it to the County, and then The Land Conservancy of New Jersey and The Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program will be able to begin working on the plan.

 

  1. Ordinance to Amend Salary Ordinances for Supervisors, Non-Union, Blue Collar, and White Collar Employees

 

Ms. Mailander stated that these are either titles which they had not used before and are now setting salary ranges for them, or titles where they adjusted the salary ranges.  This is a clean-up ordinance.

 

  1. Policy

 

  1. Request to Amend Chapter 212 – Tennis Courts – Rules and Regulations

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the current rules and regulations will remain, which is that you have to have a permit tag to be displayed on request, you have an application, a registration, collecting fees.  She read through the rules and regulations that were now added. 

 

  1. Amending Chapter 190 Land Use Development – Illuminated Signs in Business District

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was sent to the Village Council by the Planning Board.  This does expire on December 31st, so she would like to get it adopted by the end of the year.  They can bring it back September 4th, but she would like to proceed with it at that time.  There was a consensus that the Village Council was willing to introduce it as proposed by the Planning Board.

 

  1. Flagpole Ordinance

 

Ms. Mailander stated that Mr. Rogers put together a memorandum of the issues that should be considered for the recently installed flagpole at Memorial Park at Van Neste Square.  Mr. Rogers stated that this was if the Village Council wanted to take action and regulate the use of the flagpole.  He added that there are recognized constitutional issues with regards to any flags that are placed on the flagpole that can’t be regulated with regard to content or what they are showing.  There are a number of things that can be discussed.  There is a weight limit on the flagpole, so the Village Council can think about the type of material of flag, the size of the flag to be displayed, the number of flags that can be permitted on this flagpole at any one time, the time period that the flag is going to be flown, and the duration.  Consideration has to be given for other flags or opportunities for other flags to be flown if there is a request.  They should consider setting up a system or a permit to be requested so that they can fill out the information and the specifications with regard to the flag.  He reviewed the memorandum and additional recommendations regarding permits and timeframes.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if someone comes in with Flag A and has to get a permit and there is a fee associated with the permit, who is hoisting the flag onto the flagpole.  Mr. Rogers stated that he believes that the Village would, but it could certainly be discussed and those are some of the things that can be built into the permit fee.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked what if there was a month when someone wanted their flag there for a month but a second, third, or fourth flag comes in then maybe if everyone has their permit in on time then maybe the month gets split.  Mr. Rogers stated that was one of the reasons you may not want to fly something for the whole month, but say two week intervals.  He had a conversation a few months ago with Mr. Rutishauser with regard to weight limits of the flagpole and what can be done.  Mayor Hache stated that the size and number would be determined by the specs of the flagpole.  Mr. Rogers pointed out that those were areas that you could regulate where safety trumps constitutional issues.

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that the type of flag is going to be the easy piece.  Getting the fee for the Village staff to put the flag up and review the application, she felt they should tailor similar to the trestle sign. Mr. Rogers stated that what they do with holiday displays is to advise people they can’t apply before a certain date or after a certain date.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that people would need time to get the flag, as well.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that if she has a flag that says Happy Birthday Mike because that is her free speech, you can do that.  The train trestle is reserved for non-profits, so there are rules assigned there, but in this instance they are saying anything goes.  Councilman Sedon stated that there would not be a challenge to the content unless someone put up something that was offensive.

 

Mr. Rogers stated that safety was the issue, so if there was a flag that would promote anarchy, or puts people in peril, or deals with issues of safety, then there is a possibility that you can regulate that.  He can certainly work up the wording that would cover that type of circumstance.  Other than that, Mike’s Birthday would be known by everyone.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked what type of flag would promote anarchy.  Mr. Rogers stated that the only thing that comes to mind was a flag that said kill everyone, which would be something that would be precluded from going up there.  Councilman Sedon asked if they could do anything about offensive language.  Mr. Rogers stated that free speech is designed to prevent people from being offensive, so you have to be careful when you’re talking about that.

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that in states where they flew the confederate flag, there must be change to their ordinances that could be reviewed to reflect that change.  So, maybe they should look into how it was worded.  Mr. Rogers agreed.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they put up the United States flag instead.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that someone found the Betsy Ross flag, and Mr. Rogers stated that was why you stay away from offensive in the wording. Councilman Sedon stated that he was at an event a number of years ago but someone was handing out stickers that said F Cancer, which is a positive message but it is packaged with an offensive word.  Mr. Rogers stated that in terms of regulating the wording, that aspect of it has been dealt with by the courts a number of times, and they give direction as to what you can and cannot do.

 

Councilman Sedon stated that on the permitting, he was thinking about the same thing that Councilwoman Walsh was about the train trestle sign and suggested Mr. Rogers look at that wording.  Mr. Rogers stated that they do have regulations with regard to the holiday displays and they need time to process the permit and make sure that you are going to be able to accommodate the request as best you can.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that if the pole can maintain two flags they should always have the second be the American Flag, because if two flags are approved you could have opposing positions and then you are missing the point.  Mr. Rogers stated that doesn’t take any type of precedent.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that the American Flag always has to be on top.  Councilwoman Walsh agreed.  Councilman Sedon stated that he would just say only one flag at a time.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that if it is going to be one flag, in the sense of equal opportunity, then you have to narrow your window of opportunity for that flag to fly because you might have overlap.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that it is just like the trestle with first come first served.  Mr. Rogers stated that the trestle is regulated by the space, whereas this isn’t regulated at all.  Ms. Mailander suggested they come up with some kind of proposed ordinance for the future and bring it back to the Village Council.  

 

  1. Green Team and REAC

 

Councilman Sedon stated that there is an obvious synergy between the Green Team and REAC, all they are doing for REAC is changing the name to Green Ridgewood.  After he pulled the Village Code, the biggest changes being made were changing all the names from REAC to Green Ridgewood and then removing language that designates an alternate and making everyone a member.  The Green Team originally was put together as a sub-committee for REAC, but they want to be recertified next year.  So, around January, the Green Team is going to split off from REAC and get the Village certified again for Sustainable Jersey.  The members checked with Sustainable Jersey, and they seemed fine with it.  These are minor changes to clean up these two ordinances and reflect what is going on right now with the committees.

 

Ms. Mailander asked if REAC was just changing its name to Green Ridgewood Committee, and then the Green Team is going to remain as is.  The only change to the ordinance is establishing it, so that anything that mentions it is going to say Green Ridgewood Committee, but they remain as two separate committees.  Councilman Sedon stated that they would remain as two separate committees because you don’t have to register every year with Sustainable Jersey. So, that way, it allows the Green Team to splinter off and focus on the application and then of course, if Green Ridgewood can support the Sustainable Jersey pieces of it.  Mayor Hache asked if designating the members from alternate to regular was just for Green Ridgewood.  Councilman Sedon stated that it was just Green Ridgewood members.  He added that it is just a rebrand for a green year with the plastic bag ban and Earth Day.  Ms. Mailander stated they would have these two ordinances with the changes made.  

 

  1. Operations

 

  1. 2020 Village Council Meeting Schedule

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this year there are a lot of different holidays that interfere with their regular meeting days.  The recommendation is to move each meeting forward in January, and in February they are moving those meetings forward one week, as well.  In April, the second Wednesday is the first night of Passover, and so they are recommending that those be moved forward one week.  July 1, is a Wednesday, so they are moving it forward one week.  In November, Veterans Day is Wednesday and so they are recommending that they move that one to a Monday because the following week is the League of Municipalities Conference.  All the other dates remain the same.  She also wanted to move the Coffee with the Council date to September 12, 2020.

 

  1. Approve Grant Application – New Jersey Department of Transportation

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is an annual Municipal Aid grant that the Village applies for and put in to received funds to resurface South Broad Street from East Ridgewood Avenue to the municipal line with Glen Rock.  Part of the grant application process is that they need a resolution to approve it and submit with the application.

 

  1. 2020 Municipal Aid Grant – Engineering Division

 

  1. Major Soil Permit – Hudson Street Parking Lot

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Engineering Division’s conditions for the major soil moving permit were discussed at the Planning Board last night.  They have been incorporated into the resolution and trucking routes will be carefully coordinated with the Village’s Police Department.  They received a letter from the Planning Board that they did discuss this last night and recommended that the governing body issue the major soil moving permit.

  1. Resident Survey

 

Ms. Mailander stated that during the budget discussions, she mentioned that the Borough of Fair Lawn had conducted a resident survey several years ago, to determine what was and was not important to residents.  They then used this information to determine priorities for budgeting.  She suggested sending it out in September and then getting it back in late October.  She reviewed the questions that Fair Lawn asked, and what the Village could possibly ask.

 

Mayor Hache stated that when you are asking questions it is important to have the context so if you ask someone how do you feel about rear yard pickup, and would they love it if they knew what the savings could be.  He added it was important to have the context of the numbers behind it.  He asked how this survey was distributed.  Ms. Mailander stated that they mailed it, but it could certainly be distributed.  Mayor Hache suggested including a unique number so they could assure there were no duplicates.  Ms. Mailander stated that they did not accept anonymous surveys, and one survey per household.  She also suggested doing it similar to how it was done with the Master Plan. 

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that if you don’t allow anonymous you aren’t allowing a filter for the information; a lot of people feel very uncomfortable completing a survey and putting their name on it, especially if they are senior citizens.  Ms. Mailander added that she would talk to Bob Rooney to see if he had any related budget questions that maybe they could charge for, or get an idea of whether people value that service.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that it is important that this is a very small piece of the municipal tax dollars, as they need to recalculate those percentages because the BOE budget has gone up significantly at a greater pace than the Village’s municipal budget.

 

  1. FEMA Flood Map Inclusions

 

Ms. Mailander stated that there are new flood maps that are going to be effective on August 28, 2019 and they have a significant incongruity or error in them.  The area of concern is along the Ho-Ho-Kus Brook, from First Street southward on either side of North Maple Avenue to the brook itself.  It looks like approximately 33 additional properties will be in the flood plain.  Engineering has checked the elevation of the newly included properties and feels there is a significant error being created by the FEMA/FIRM maps.  There are some property owners who may be considering a legal challenge to this to have the mapping corrected.  Therefore, the Village Engineer has indicated that perhaps the Village may be interested in joining the residents to have the mapping corrected due to the number of effected properties, subject to Mr. Roger’s legal opinion.

 

Mr. Rogers stated that he hasn’t had a chance to talk to Mr. Rutishauser about it yet, but he thinks the Village’s position would be much different than the individual property owners.  There is certainly a mechanism out there for a municipality to challenge any type of error and see if they can define the error and what may happen.  He suggested they support the best they can but don’t join or become a party to any lawsuit that is started by a property owner.  The Village should try to deal with this administratively with FEMA to correct whatever error is there, so that they are doing their part to try to help the residents.

 

  1. REVIEW OF AUGUST 14, 2019 PUBLIC MEETING AGENDA

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was a review of the August 14, 2019 Public Meeting Agenda.

 

Proclamations: Commemorate 100th Anniversary of Ridgewood’s American Legion Post 53 and Honor Its Mission as a Patriotic Veterans Organization Devoted to Mutual Helpfulness; Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over 2019 Statewide Crackdown; Declare September Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month; and Declare September National Preparedness Month.

 

There are no ordinances for introduction or public hearing for Ridgewood Water.

 

Resolutions for Ridgewood Water include: Award Contract Under Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing Contract – 2020 Ford Escape; Award Contract Under North Jersey Wastewater Cooperative Purchasing Contract – Installation and Replacement of Pumps and Motors; and Award Contract Under North Jersey Wastewater Cooperative Purchasing Contract – Installation and Replacement of Pumps and Motors.

 

The following ordinances are scheduled for introduction: 3729 – Bond Ordinance – Acquisition of Vehicles for Parking Utility; 3732 – Bond Ordinance – Acquisition of Vehicles – Parks Department and Traffic & Signal Department; 3733 – Bond Ordinance – Reappropriating Funds for Scarab Windrow Turner; 3734 – Establish Loading Zone at Train Station Parking Lot; 3735 – Establish Reserved Parking Spaces at Train Station Parking Lot – NJ Transit and Concession Stand/Social Services; 3736 – Amend Chapter 265 – Vehicles and Traffic – Time Limit Parking on Monte Vista, Park Slope, Madison Place and North Hillside Avenue; 3737 – Amend Fire Prevention Inspection Fees; 3738 – Amend Various Salary Ordinances; and 3739 – Amend Chapter 212 – Tennis Courts – Rules and Regulations.

 

The scheduled public hearings include: 3728 – Designate Parking Spaces in Train Station Lot for Hudson Street Lot Permit Holders; 3730 – Amend Chapter 190 – Land Use and Development – Swimming Pools; and 3731 – Amend Chapter 190 – Land Use and Development – Permit Real Estate Open House Signs.

 

Resolutions include: Title 59 Approval – Leaf Collection Services; Award Contract – Leaf Collection Services; Award Contract Under State Contract – Carpeting for Various Offices in Village Hall; Award Contract Under State Contract – 2 Chevrolet Tahoes – Police Department; Award Contract Under State Contract – Mobile Radios for Police Vehicles; Award Contract Under State Contract – Furnishing and Delivering Patrol Equipment for Police Vehicles; Award Contract Under State Contract – Panasonic Tough Books – Police Department; Award Contract Under State Contract – Server Upgrade; Award Contract Under State Contract – Printer Upgrades and Replacements; Award Contract Under State Contract – Ruggedized Network Switches; Award Contract Under State Contract – Aruba Switches and Network Upgrades; Award Contract Under State Contract – Wi-Fi Access Points; Award Contract Under State Contract – Renewal of Spatial Data Logic Software; Award Professional Services Contract – Professional Planning Consultant – Green Acres Diversion; Authorize Change Order – Train Station Parking Expansion; Authorize Change Order – Resurfacing Glen Tennis Court; Authorize Shared Services Agreement – Municipal Court Administrator and Deputy Municipal Court Administrator (Glen Rock); Authorize Shared Services Agreement – Floodplain Protection Planning Services (Bergen County); Approve Submission of NJDOT Grant Application and Authorize Execution of Grant Agreement – South Broad Street Resurfacing; Authorize Major Soil Moving Permit – Hudson Street Parking Lot; Declare Property Surplus – Police Department Vehicles; Declare Property Surplus – Streets Department Paving Box; and Cancel General Capital Ordinance Balances.

 

  1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

 

Boyd Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that he was listening with some interest to the discussion about the two parking spaces that are in front of Westside Bagels, and the first thing that came to his mind was how did two parking spaces get installed at that location and nobody knows about it as it was all done unofficially.  He wondered how many other parking spaces are there in the Village that are unlawful and were not created by ordinance.  He asked if this was a process that the Village Council was going to undertake now to ensure that there were no other rogue parking spaces.  He asked how many summonses that were issued for people who parked there, as those have to be invalid.  As the spaces aren’t legit, how could you issue a summons to someone.  Mr. Loving stated that people are putting money in the meters but the spaces aren’t authorized, and he asked if they could continue to collect revenue for spaces that aren’t on the books. He understands that the businesses don’t want those spaces removed but they are unlawful.  He reiterated his sentiments and added that it seems like a big mess to him and he is concerned that there didn’t seem to be any urgency in their voices that this needs to be fixed right away and he suggested talking with Mr. Rogers regarding any summonses that had been issued regarding those two spots.

 

There were no additional comments from the public.

 

Mayor Hache stated that Mr. Loving raised some interesting and important questions.  Mr. Rogers stated that he found out about the lack of enacting an ordinance yesterday or today from Susan and she asked the same questions.  He doesn’t know that there is a need for urgency regarding tonight’s discussion but the steps have been taken to make sure that enforcement on those gets directed in the proper way.  If someone wants to challenge the issuance of a summons they can do that.  The aspect of how long it has been there and as far as he remembers those spaces have been striped there.  There may be others in the ordinances, but the Manager’s office is prepared to handle those things.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen added that all this predates the current Village Council and was uncovered by chance.  Mayor Hache stated that they can use the inventory of the meters and compare it to established ordinances.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. RESOLUTION TO GO INTO CLOSED SESSION

 

Deputy Village Clerk, Donna Jackson read Resolution #19-252 to go into Closed Session as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. ADJOURNMENT

 

There being no further business to come before the Village Council, on a motion by Councilman Sedon, seconded by Councilwoman Knudsen, and carried unanimously by voice vote, the Village Council’s Work Session was adjourned at 10:44 P.M.

 

 

 

 

______________________________

                                                                                                      Ramon M. Hache, Sr.                              

                                                                                                                        Mayor                          

 

______________________________

              Donna M. Jackson

           Deputy Village ClerkA REGULAR WORK SESSION OF THE VILLAGE COUNCIL OF THE VILLAGE OF RIDGEWOOD HELD IN THE SYDNEY V. STOLDT, JR. COURT ROOM OF THE RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE HALL, 131 NORTH MAPLE AVENUE, RIDGEWOOD, NEW JERSEY ON AUGUST 7, 2019 AT 7:30 P.M.

 

  1. CALL TO ORDER – OPEN PUBLIC MEETINGS ACT – ROLL CALL – FLAG     SALUTE

 

Mayor Hache called the meeting to order at 7:30 P.M. and read the Statement of Compliance with the Open Public Meetings Act.  At roll call the following were present: Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Walsh, and Mayor Hache.  Also present were Heather Mailander, Village Manager/Village Clerk; Donna Jackson, Deputy Village Clerk; and Matthew Rogers, Village Attorney. Councilman Voigt was absent.

 

Mayor Hache led those in attendance in the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag as well as in a Moment of Silence to honor the brave men and women serving in our armed forces and all our first responders, as well as Judy Caruso, beloved nurse at Travell School for over 20 years who passed away recently.

 

  1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

 

Ronald A. Rozenweig, Woodfield Realty, 4 Wilsey Square, stated he was here tonight because there was something on the agenda which he believes has been removed, which was for the Village to remove two of the four 15 minute parking spaces on the eastbound side of West Ridgewood Avenue.  He was at the meeting on behalf of his tenants who are greatly concerned about the impact this would have on the viability of their businesses.  Five of the tenants are concerned because they have small businesses which rely on in and out businesses, such as Puzo’s Pizza, Davis Surgical Supply, The Wine Seller, West Side Bagel, and Pazzazed.  They are all concerned about the loss of business and the viability of their businesses with the loss of those parking spaces.  Mr. Rozenweig added that the right hand turn lane is rarely used anyway, and most people coming to that intersection are taking a left to come into town, so removing those two parking spaces makes no sense.  There are other solutions which are easily available and would leave those four parking spaces which are the only four parking spaces on that whole block and are the ones that those businesses rely on. 

 

Lee Warren, 140 Washington Place, stated that she came home from vacation to come to this meeting because she was made aware of the taking away of parking on West Ridgewood Avenue.  She wants to be sure the Village was aware of how much these businesses that surround these parking spots give back to our community.  They support Lax Day, Ridgewood Jamboree, baseball events, Graydon swim team, Ridgewood High School swim team, and other events.  She asked if the reason they were going to take away two fifteen minute spaces was because someone in Ridgewood was impatient and wants to make a right, but can’t.  Ms. Warren added that it was absurd, and she was worried about the businesses as well as the children who cross at these intersections to go into town.  She suggested that with the right on red, which is the right of way for the cross walk people; it might be more dangerous for those walking across the street.

 

Ms. Warren stated that between 9 and 11 there were 19 people who used those parking spots, no one longer than seven minutes, on the most deserted week in Ridgewood.  This is a very busy parking area and we cannot afford to take those spots away from the townspeople and the businesses that are trying to stay afloat.  She also asked if the bike lane was disappearing.

 

Tom Shanley, proprietor of The Wine Seller, 6 West Ridgewood Avenue, stated that he has been in this store for five years and sees this intersection every day.  The last thing that the Village Council needs to do is to increase speeds in that area.  He has seen cars hitting cars, cars hitting school buses, and knocking down lampposts.  The lights that were put on the bicycle rack got knocked over twice.  If anything, something needs to be done to make it safer.  People who park across the street are going to be crossing West Ridgewood Avenue with the light red, and there will now be a third lane of traffic zipping through to make the right on red.  Mr. Shanley said that within a year they would have a big serious injury there, not to mention that during the school year between 3:00 P.M. and 4:00 P.M. that sidewalk is full of kids horsing around.  Now, there are going to be cars flying down hugging that curb while the kids are playing around.  He asked the Village Council why it was dropped from the agenda this evening.

 

Mark Berchardi, Westside Bagels, 2 Wilsey Square, stated that he has owned Westside Bagels for eleven years and those parking spots are the lifeblood of his business.  The average customer that comes into his store spends less than ten minutes in the store.  They park there and some park across the street, but most don’t because they have to wait to cross at the light.  Taking away two of those spots at any time of the day will significantly impact his business.  He stated that the last thing this Village can afford is to have any open real estate in the downtown area.  Between 3:00 P.M. and 4:00 P.M. during the school year is one of the busiest parts of his day.  He has kids from GW who walk to his store every day to get a snack after school. Also, to increase the traffic flow in that area is very dangerous.  Mr. Berchardi asked that the Village Council consider the comments that have been put before them tonight.  He added that he has signatures of 75 customers who have signed a petition asking the Village not to remove those parking spots.

 

Jenny Shanley, The Wine Seller, 6 West Ridgewood Avenue, stated that she is a logical person and this just isn’t logical to her.  She asked if the Village Council took an aerial view of what that intersection looks like, as it doesn’t make sense to her that taking away those two spots would actually alleviate what the Village is trying to do.  She thinks they would have to take all four spots away to make it work.  She added that it is West Ridgewood Avenue, not Route 17, and asked if this was something that they were going to do throughout Ridgewood.  Across the street at the train station they took down trees, grass, and green area to create more parking spots which is an ongoing battle in Ridgewood.  Pedestrian safety is going to be the biggest issue of all, as they would like to keep the kids, pedestrians, and visitors who come to town spend their money here, safely.

 

Phil Dolce, 625 Kingsbridge Lane, stated that on behalf of the residents on the East side of the Village, he wanted to thank the Village Council for not turning the Schedler property into a 90 foot baseball field with lights, refreshment stands and overwhelming traffic.  He thanked the Village Council for planting trees along the historic Saddle River Road and Route 17.  Mr. Dolce thanked the Village Council for recognizing the historic value of the Schedler House.  The house already is listed on the Village Master Plan as an historic home and is eligible for National and State listing for its historic value.  As soon as an archaeological evaluation is finished he is sure it will be on National and State registers.  This historic Schedler House is in disrepair, but only because of eight years of neglect by the previous Village Manager and the previous Council majority.  The house was livable when it was purchased originally.  Local neighbors on the east side have already spent $10,000 of their own money since 2009 to prevent the house from further ruin by putting on tarps and are prepared to put up even more money to aid in the restoration or use of the house.  This is their dedication as it is important. 

 

Mr. Dolce thanked the Village Council for understanding the significant negative effects that closing the Glen School had on residents of the east side.  Closing that school was absolutely devastating, not only because it affected property values and students, but it injured the sense of community that only a school gives to a local area.  Therefore, the Schedler House and the property are the only way of restoring the sense of community in that area.  Finally, he thanked the Village Council for realizing that the residents of the east side are not second class citizens, but tax paying residents that deserve equal treatment with the rest of the Village.  There are 568 homes that pay over $9 million in taxes, but they do not have the facilities that are given to the middle of town.

 

Kathryn Schmidt, 123 South Irving Street, stated that she wanted to continue some of the themes here.  She is a huge fan of 15 minute parking spaces as the convenience of running in and out is really important.  She added that she is very supportive of increasing parking as much as they can and she echoed the sentiments of others asking why the Village Council would remove these spaces.  This is not Route 17 or the Thruway, so she hoped that they could preserve those parking spaces.

 

Ms. Schmidt added that she is very supportive of Schedler, but when she saw the price tag she was shocked.  She asked that they make sure that there is a good roof over the top of it before they spend all of this money, but she thinks they are going in the right direction.  She added that she would like to see the topic of Air Babb come up again, as she thinks there is a way that it can be done without bothering neighbors.  Finally, she gets a lot of her information about what is going on by reading the blogs and Facebook pages, and that it has become so obvious that what you say matters and she continues to be amazed at the language that is being used.  At the end of the day it is not helping to bring our community together, which is not the way we should be acting.  She added that she hopes that on all levels they can tone down the rhetoric.

 

Anne Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that she would like to know if it would be possible in the week or so after Graydon closes before the water is drained, if there could be a dog day at Graydon.  She added that she thinks it would be wonderful as the parks were recently opened to dogs, and perhaps an exception could be made of a one day event at Graydon.  It is her recollection that in the week or so after Graydon closes, there is a Village employee party at Graydon, so obviously it would not be that day.  Ms. Loving added that she wasn’t sure if she should ask Ms. Bigos or the Village Manager, but she thinks it would be a nice thing and she would like to put that request in.

 

There were no additional comments from the public.

 

Mayor Hache stated that he wanted to answer some of the questions and clarify the doubts.  There were some questions as to why the issue came up and why it was removed.  He would like to remind everyone that just because they discuss something, they are not deciding for or against something.  The item was pulled from the agenda at the last meeting because they had looked at some of the language because it was ambiguous.  Those two spots don’t actually exist and were never voted on by the Village Council.  He asked that it be removed from this agenda, as having it during the summer when there is the lowest amount of traffic going through that intersection would be a disservice.  He wanted to get input from the businesses and residents about that intersection.  Standing on that corner today would give a very different picture than what he would see in September.

 

Mayor Hache stated that the dog day at Graydon is a neat idea and he would imagine it would involve suspending of their ordinance.  Ms. Mailander stated that it would.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the issue of the two parking spaces was removed from the agenda because the Village Council can’t hold a public hearing to remove two parking spaces either way because the spots legally don’t exist.  If there is no ordinance that created those parking spaces they can’t rescind it because it just is not there.  The beauty of this process is that the businesses were all notified and have opportunity to come here this evening and voice their concerns.  They will have to go back now and revisit the spaces and go through a process to introduce those two parking spaces as an ordinance and then hold a public hearing for or against adopting that ordinance.  They have to go back to square one and create those spaces.  This is something that obviously they have to revisit and this Village Council is one of the most businesses friendly Village Council’s that she has seen in a very long time.

 

Mayor Hache stated that they can’t meet to remove something that doesn’t exist, but they would have to formally meet to have those spaces exist legally.  There is no ordinance to establish them, so they can’t rescind them, but they would have to create an ordinance to have them established legally.

 

  1. MANAGERS REPORT

 

Village Council Public Meeting – Ms. Mailander stated that the next Village Council Public Meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, August 14th at 8:00 P.M.  The next meeting after that will be the September 4th Work Session at 7:30 P.M.

 

Hudson Street Parking Lot – Ms. Mailander stated that she wanted to be sure that residents know that the Hudson Street Parking Lot will be closing on Monday, August 19th due to the construction of the new parking deck.  There have been signs up since last week in the parking lot but they are trying to spread the word as much as they can.  A groundbreaking ceremony for the parking garage will take place on September 7th at 9:00 A.M. and everyone is invited to attend.

 

Ash Trees – Ms. Mailander stated that several Ash trees on the Dayton Street side of Memorial Park at Van Neste Square have been examined and evaluated and have been found to be in decline.  For public safety reasons these trees are scheduled to be removed next week, weather permitting.

 

Note Sale – Ms. Mailander stated that yesterday there was a note sale and they sold $32,727,000 of notes, consisting of $15,197,000 bond anticipation notes, $17,000,000 Water Utility bond anticipation notes, and $530,000 Parking Utility bond anticipation notes.  This sale generated money for new projects of approximately $5,700,000 of general capital, and $6,860,000 of Water Utility capital.  The balance of the funds is used to roll over existing notes.  There were four bidders, TD Securities, Bank of New York, Oppenheimer and Company, and Jeffries.  TD Securities was the successful bidder by a very narrow margin with an annual interest rate of 1.75% and a variable interest cost of 1.309%.  This is the lowest net interest cost for short term borrowing our bond council has seen this year.  Bob Rooney will be working with Acacia to determine the amount and timing of future long and short term borrowing.

 

Bergen Bites Back! – Ms. Mailander stated that especially after heavy rains, please clean drains and gutters. Keep swimming pools adequately treated and please remove standing water.  It only takes seven days for mosquitos to grow and your efforts make a difference for everyone.

 

Healthbarn – Ms. Mailander stated that Healthbarn just completed its annual inspection by the New Jersey Department of Health Consumer, Environmental and Occupational Health Service and continues to be accredited by National Nutrition Education Standards and by adhering to National Safety Standards. 

 

Children’s Sensory and Butterfly Garden – Ms. Mailander stated that the Children’s Sensory and Butterfly Garden behind The Stable is currently in full bloom, and she encouraged people to come and visit.

 

“The Great Swamp: NJ’s Natural Heritage” – Ms. Mailander stated that this is a lecture by NJ photojournalist Jim Del Giudice and will take place Monday, August 12th in the Anne Zusy Youth Lounge from 10:00 A.M. to 11:30 A.M.  The history of the 7,000 acres that comprise the great swamp has been integral to the Passaic Valley Watershed.  Admission is $5 and registration is required.

 

Graydon Pool – Ms. Mailander reminded everyone that Graydon Pool is open daily from 10:00 A.M. to 7:30 P.M.  Late season hours begin on August 12th, weekday hours will be noon to 7:30 P.M. and weekdays/holidays 10:00 A.M. to 7:30 P.M.

 

Art Exhibit at The Stable – Ms. Mailander stated that the art exhibit entitled “Inside Small Works” there will be an artist reception on August 8th from 7:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.

 

Kasschau Memorial Shell – Ms. Mailander stated that tomorrow’s performance at the Kasschau Memorial Shell located on Veterans Field behind the Library, will be the last performance of the season, and the programs begins at 8:30 P.M.

 

Camps for Village Youth – Ms. Mailander stated that for the remainder of the summer there will be a wide variety of camps available for Village youth.  Skateboarding, golf, pony share, summer STEM, and lacrosse.

 

Ridgewood Guild – Ms. Mailander stated that the Ridgewood Guild provides free Movies under the Stars on Wednesday nights.  This evening was supposed to be The Sixth Sense, but due to the rain it was postponed until tomorrow night.  If it rains tomorrow night it will be screened on Wednesday August 14th.  The film will begin at approximately 8:30 P.M.  There is one additional movie, ET, on August 21st.  Bring a chair or a blanket and enjoy the show.

 

Chamber of Commerce Annual Car Show – Ms. Mailander stated that the Chamber of Commerce Annual Car Show will be around Memorial Park at Van Neste Square on Friday, September 6th from 6:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.  There is no rain date, and trophies are at 8:30 P.M.

 

Farmers Market – Ms. Mailander stated that the Farmers Market is open every Sunday through October 27th on the West Side of the Train Station from 9:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M.  She encouraged people to come and meet the farmers.  The Ridgewood Farmers Market is a real farmers market and is brought to us by the members of the Ridgewood Chamber of Commerce.

 

Bergen County Utilities Authority – Ms. Mailander stated that there is a free recycling event on Saturday, August 17th from 9:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. at Bergen Community College.  They will collect old tires, computers, and electronics.  And there is a mobile paper shredding truck that will be there.  This event is rain or shine and requires proof of residency.

 

Mayors Wellness Festival – Ms. Mailander stated that the Mayor’s Wellness Festival is slated for Sunday, September 22nd from 11:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. in Memorial Park at Van Neste Square.  All local health, medical, fitness and wellness providers are invited to participate.  This year there will be a healthy food court and a picnic area.

 

  1. COUNCIL REPORTS

 

Historic Preservation Commission – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Historic Preservation Commission is canceled for tomorrow evening.

 

Planning Board – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the Planning Board met last night and went over their new by-laws that should be adopted two meetings from now.  Mayor Hache added that they swore in Allison Wesner as the new Class 4 member of the Planning Board last night.

 

Master Plan Advisory Board Meeting – Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they met last night and Neil Desai of NV5 reviewed the results of the Visioning Process with the committee.  They had invited some members of the public to join them, and it was interesting that it came up in the visioning results of the survey that many folks are uncomfortable with the rhetoric on social media as it relates to Ridgewood topics and they feel that it can be taken down a few notches.  They also had the opportunity to hear from the new planner and they were concerned about historic preservation throughout the Village and the Schedler House.  The planner gave them a road map for both private and public property as to how they can do a better job preserving historic structures throughout the Village and those that many feel give the charming character and history to the Village.

 

Car Show – Councilwoman Walsh added that if anyone had vehicles that they think would be worthy of the show you can get an application with the Chamber of Commerce on their website.

 

Hudson Street Parking Garage – Mayor Hache stated that the Village Manager, Village Engineer, Deputy Mayor, and himself took a drive out to Denver, Pennsylvania last week to visit the company that is preparing the precast concrete for the Hudson Street Parking structure and had a tour of the facility and saw the quality of the construction of the pieces that will be assembled here.  They have officially signed off on the materials and the colors that they will use and they are moving forward.  The groundbreaking is September 7th but the lot actually goes under construction August 19th

 

Councilwoman Knudsen added that CFO, Bob Rooney, joined them on the visit to Hyde Concrete and they had an opportunity to view an augmented reality version of our structure through a holo- lens and see the garage in a lot of dimensions.  They will receive a copy of that video and will get as much of that information online as possible.  There is a lot of video and pictures of how they pour and create the concrete pieces.

 

Mayor Hache stated that for the groundbreaking ceremony on September 7th, Table at Latonas has generously offered to provide coffee and continental breakfast of everyone afterwards.

 

Central Business District Advisory Committee – Mayor Hache stated that CBDAC is meeting tomorrow.

 

125th Anniversary – Mayor Hache stated that the 125th Anniversary Committee met this week and were celebrating the fact that they were moving forward with the Ridgewood Community Foundation which is a 501(c)3 organization that will help to promote a lot of activities in town and will help fund the activities of the boards and committees.  This is a good opportunity for those committees to raise money.  The 125th Anniversary Gala will take place on November 2nd at Events by Felina, which should be opening in October.

 

  1. DISCUSSION

 

  1. Budget

 

  1. Schedler House Rehabilitation

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they went out for bids which were higher than the amount they had appropriated.  These are prequalified bidders because it is an historic structure.  It was rebid on August 1st and the Village received three bids.  They bid package requested bids for three items and using the aggregate, Dell-Tech of Trenton was the lowest bidder at $1,126,250.  The Village currently doesn’t have that total amount available; however, there are options as to how they would like to award this because it was bid as A, B, and C.

 

Tom Connolly, Principal Architect of Connolly and Hickey Historical Architects, stated that they are the firm that prepared the contract documents for the interior and exterior restoration of the Zabriskie-Schedler House, and prepared some of the historical reports which enabled some of the grants that the Village received from Bergen County.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they have a fiduciary obligation to taxpayer dollars, but also are stewards of our resources and our historic grounds and structures.  So, they want to make sure they get this right and she was interested in understanding his perspective of how the price tag went from $7-800,000 to the $1.1 million.  Mr. Connolly stated that their estimates were completed in 2016 and before any contract documents were prepared.  So, maybe they didn’t understand the full scope of the work.  A larger part of the issue is the economy.  He received a letter from another contractor that it is a super-hot economy; costs have skyrocketed; and everybody is busy.  The last time they did see something like this was in 2005 or 2006, when estimates for this type of work meant nothing.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if the prequalification process affects this.  Mr. Connolly stated that their pool of contractors that they can pull from for restoration has to comply with the Secretary of the Interior Standards for Rehabilitation of Historic Properties.  It says they have to guide the restoration process.  There are a few qualified contractors in the State that can perform this work.  New contractors get qualified in the State, but it is a process.

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that typically when you see estimates, you see general requirements.  What is glaring on these three is that one person has $106,000 and the next bid is $10,000.  She is trying to determine what the Dell-Tech bids are.  Mr. Connolly stated that it is unfortunate that they have to break things down this way, but they know the contractors and how they put bids together.  Looking at the bottom line, they are generally close to where they are. When they put the bid together, they put money all over the place.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that the challenge they see all the time is Change Orders.  She wondered if the low bidder would request a Change Order to bring a low estimate up to the correct amount.  Mr. Connolly stated that they go through these bids line by line and understand what these contractors include and felt that Dell-Tech’s bid was right on.  Councilwoman Walsh reiterated that the last thing they want are Change Orders.  Mr. Connolly stated that they typically allow for unforeseen conditions in restoration work of about 10% to 15%, but they are already over that right off the bat.

 

Councilwoman Walsh asked if their bid would then correlate with the descriptions.  So, if they look at the price for finishes, it will be defined that they can’t come back and describe something else.  Mr. Connolly stated that they are required to do what is in the contract documents, and there is no way he will allow them to not complete something if it is in black and white.  Unforeseen conditions exist, but they have unit prices in the project for things such as that.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that was her biggest concern because they were so variant.  Mr. Connolly stated that they get this question a lot and it is unfortunate that they have to break it down this way, but they put their money in different locations in the breakdown. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh asked if they could sign a guaranteed price with the contractors as they did with the parking garage.  Mayor Hache stated that it was a guaranteed maximum price, and then they work out a split between the difference of the GMP and the cost.  Mr. Connolly stated that whatever ends up on the contract document or the specifications is what you receive.  Even if there are unforeseen items or the architects miss, you receive what is on the contract documents.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she would like to see what that list is.  Mr. Connolly stated that they have that.  There is a schedule on the drawings.  Councilwoman Walsh asked if they were agreeing with their price for that.  Mr. Connolly agreed with that.

 

Councilman Sedon stated that it is sectioned off in project A, B, and C, and asked if Mr. Connolly could explain what that entails.  Mr. Connolly stated that they broke it up to get the project underway and to use some of the grant money they have.  They are hoping that the Village can get another grant in the future and most likely they would.  Historically once you start down the process of receiving grants, the granting agency likes to see the project through.  The goal is to get the building envelope project underway with A; B is the restrooms; and C is the finishes.  Councilman Sedon stated that finishes appear in project A, B, and C and when adding up all the work it, comes out pretty similar for all of the contractors.  There was some discussion on finishes, and Mr. Connolly stated that he wouldn’t try to dissect it that much but he knows how much these things cost.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they were just to move full steam ahead, how long would Mr. Connolly estimate this might take.  Mr. Connolly stated that it is going to take a year, maybe a little less depending on the contractor.  They just completed a full interior restoration in Clifton and it took a full year.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked how long it would take to do the exterior building envelope.  Mr. Connolly stated that it would take less than six months.  Councilwoman Knudsen cited what Dr. Dolce said during his public comment.  She added that the residents on the east side of town have been living with the house in this condition for more than a decade and it is fundamentally unfair to our fellow residents who live in that neighborhood.  She added that it is important that they get this moved forward and can see at least a polished exterior so that the neighbors have a sense of comfort that the neighborhood is what it should be.

 

Mayor Hache thanked Mr. Connolly for coming tonight and added that he has been a supporter of the Schedler property and house.  His concern here is that when they looked at the original estimate, they were looking at something in the neighborhood of project B and they were now 60% to 80% higher than the original estimate.  In the course of time, they are acting and basing their decisions on certain assumptions.  Ms. Mailander stated they have the original estimates and she would share that with the Village Council after Mayor Hache completed his comments.  Mayor Hache stated that his concern is that to begin the project they are 60% to 80% higher and haven’t put one shovel in the ground and as they know now, it always costs more than the estimate.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the original estimate was broken into two phases and then with the asbestos the total project was estimated to $784,800.  They currently have applied for three rounds of grants through Bergen County Historic Preservation.  Phase 1 was the roof stabilization and planning documents.  The grant amount was $116,724 which is a 50/50 matching grant.  Phase 2A was exterior stabilization and interior rehabilitation and that was a total cost of $400,000 so it was $200,000 for each of the grant and the Village.  Phase 2B was the interior rehabilitation which was estimated at $151,300 so that was $75,650 for the grant and the Village each.  It is a total of $392,375 from the Village and from the grants which equals the $784,750.  Ms. Mailander stated that as Mr. Connolly stated, part of the reason that it has increased so dramatically is that they are busy.  The material costs have gone up between 8% and 40% not concluding the tariffs that have effecting lighting and HVAC.  Material costs keep changing; contractors are building in larger buffers in their budget due to prevailing wage as well.  The minimum wage is going up and that affects prevailing wage which the Village is required to pay.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they can apply for more grants next year, and so they currently have enough money to do A and C which is exterior and ADA improvements, or they can do A or C, and then go out for additional grants next year for the interior of the house.  This is up to the Village Council.  Mayor Hache stated that looking at the 25% tariff and the increases on minimum wage; he still doesn’t understand the increase 60% to 80% above the original estimate.  He thinks they are padding their numbers and better sharpen their pencils.  Mr. Connolly stated that they rebid the project and re-did the scope and the cost of the project didn’t come down that much.  Their estimates were done prior to doing the contract documents and his partner who does the estimates is a certified cost estimator with the State of NJ.  She is typically very good at putting estimates together for restoration, but they found in this economy, it is one of four projects that they have in the same predicament.

 

Councilman Sedon asked if there was anything that Mr. Connolly would see going through that would greatly increase the cost.  Mr. Connolly stated that the greatest thing was the asbestos, adding that it was not unusual for projects of this type to have change orders but if they do, they are usually minor in the $100s or just a thousand dollars and are for minor things.  They are doing all the structure, which is part of the project; the barrier free component is in there.  Light safety and electrical are on there, but he can’t see through walls.  They assumed a few things for the structure.  Mayor Hache asked what percentage of the project cost is labor.  Mr. Connolly said that he couldn’t tell off the top of his head, but he could get that for the Village Council.  He added that would it be in the general requirements number and probably percentage wise.  They do have a contingency for each phase, so the project could come in less than 1% if all goes well.  Mr. Connolly stated that it was approximately 13% if he took their general requirements and he doesn’t know what else they have in there that could be scaffolding and other things.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they were to award project A and project C and move forward, could they actually go out and rebid project B.  Mr. Connolly stated of course.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that if they started to do the exterior work and they get that started. Then the biggest hit is on that project B anyway, so they could back out and rebid that.  It is quite possible that there is a change in that pool of available prequalified contractors to choose from and it is also possible that economic conditions will change somewhat.  They will have to roll the dice that it doesn’t actually come back higher, which is one of the options that is available, as well.  Mr. Connolly stated that would narrow it and he would recommend rebidding project B and narrowing the scope.  With project B you are focused on just the interior.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that at this point they have a resolution to award if the Village Council would like to, but they could also put it off until September.  There was a consensus between Councilwoman Knudsen and Councilman Sedon that they were ready to move forward with project A and C.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she felt like she wanted to go back and take a look as she doesn’t remember seeing a line item for all of the items, and asked when they received that.  Ms. Mailander stated that she didn’t know if they ever got it.  Mr. Connolly stated that there is no actual breakdown of the contract documents which are architectural plans and you are getting what’s on those drawings.  Councilwoman Walsh asked if they could get this on the next agenda.  Ms. Mailander stated that would be September 4th.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she wanted to review all of the data a little bit more. 

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the problem she now sees is that they will have not awarded the contract which is an issue of timing because they want to get a roof on the building finally, after years of tarps at the expense of the generosity of our residents.  She asked if it was an issue of timing if the contract isn’t awarded and they wait until September.  Mr. Connolly stated that since they first started drafting the documents until now, the deterioration of the building has accelerated and it will continue to do so.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that this is an issue of the neighborhood and community and she would like to move forward at this point.  Mayor Hache stated that the concern is how they got from $700,000 to $1.2 million.  His fear is that they start digging and they find more problems that add to the cost.  He added that he was willing to commit to a guaranteed maximum price.  Mr. Connolly stated that was what the contractor was doing by signing the contract as they are obligated to do what’s on the contract documents, which is the restoration of the house.  Mayor Hache asked what the profit margin is of the project.  Mr. Connolly stated that he didn’t know.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they could discuss it again on September 4th and in the meantime they could have a Special Public Meeting that evening.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they could wait until September, but that wasn’t changing the price.  Mr. Connolly stated that they were obligated to hold their price for X amount of days.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that whether they do this at this point or September, the price isn’t changing.  So, the only thing at question is whether or not they are willing to spend this money for this historic preservation.  As Dr. Dolce pointed out, the community has nothing since the Glen School closed, but the price point doesn’t change until September, they are going to lose another month before getting this project moving, the deterioration is accelerating, and she doesn’t see the price changing. 

 

Mayor Hache stated that it isn’t a matter of price but where is the funding as they were working under particular assumptions.  Mr. Connolly stated that it wasn’t unusual for this to happen.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that the funding is in place for A and C.  Mayor Hache stated that they were funding for a particular estimated cost, and that means that now the funding falls short of the cost of the project. So, how does that gap get filled.  Ms. Mailander stated that they could go for grants again next year and can bond.  Mr. Connolly stated that historically, once you start down the path with grants and are awarded grants they tend to see the project through and this is not uncommon for the cost to increase as you move forward with a restoration.  Mayor Hache stated that he agreed with Councilwoman Walsh and wanted to look at this further. 

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked when the next public meeting is.  Ms. Mailander stated that it was Wednesday.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they could have the information being requested by Tuesday next week.  Mr. Connolly stated that they could have it tomorrow.  Councilwoman Knudsen said that they should put it on the agenda for Wednesday, August 14th.  She thinks the residents in that neighborhood are entitled to see this come to some conclusion as quickly as possible, and she thinks that the residents are owed at least some modicum of expediency.  Mayor Hache added that he thinks the residents are owed a bit more diligence on this because they don’t have all of the information.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked when everyone got the packets.  Ms. Mailander stated that the information with the questions and answers was handing out this evening.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked about A, B, and C.  Ms. Mailander stated that it was last week.  Councilman Sedon stated that they should wait until everyone feels more comfortable.  They need a resolution to this but he thinks that people need to feel comfortable one way or another and more time is required for that.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that at some point; you drag your feet for a decade; and here we are tonight with an opportunity to change the trajectory of where this is leading; and she suggested adding to the agenda for next week.

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that she understands the lowest bidder on concrete estimated $11,000 while the other two received the same specs and came out to $48,520 and $52,500.  She asked if their guy underbid to get the job and then they are going to get a change order.  Mr. Connolly stated that they were not going to get a change order, as he is required to do the work laid out.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that was the piece that she didn’t feel that she had a handle on.  Mr. Connolly stated that by taking a look at line item 5, you will see there are variations there.  As well, you can’t look at these breakdowns because they throw numbers all over the place.  This is meant more for the architects because they understand how it works.  There was some additional discussion about the concrete work. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that the estimates are all over the place, and she asked what the true estimates are line by line because they do so many change orders a year.  Ms. Mailander stated that they do several change orders a year, but asked if Councilwoman Walsh was saying that the only time they would have a change order on this bid is if she found something that wasn’t on this bid.  Mr. Connolly stated that as long as it’s on his drawings they are obligated to install it.  Ms. Mailander and Mr. Connolly were in agreement that the contractors are bound by those numbers to do whatever is stipulated on those drawings.  Ms. Mailander added that in her mind, the only time there was going to be a change order is if they encounter something in a wall that they didn’t realize was there.  Mr. Connolly agreed, but added that you would have to look at the contract documents to understand the project but it is all there. 

 

Ms. Mailander asked Mr. Connolly if he had some sort of estimate or cost breakdown in his mind of what he thought each item was going to cost.  Mr. Connolly stated that in his mind he didn’t prepare that, but it should be his original estimate.  Ms. Mailander clarified that it was the overall number and not line by line.  Mr. Connolly stated that looking at Dell Tech’s line items for specialties he has $0 but in the specifications it is for soap dispensers in the rest room, so he may have put that in another line which is a communication problem, but it is on their drawings and he is required to include those items.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she understood the documents and that they were using a computer system that probably assigned the values.  The contractors involved here are prequalified and so it is a very specialized area and the way they are breaking this out is probably very different than for your house. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that she doesn’t think it is very different from a house, and asked them to show her where the doorknobs and hinges are.  Mr. Connolly stated that there are about 40 pages of drawings, so there is no list as it is graphic.  Councilwoman Walsh asked where they are placing these items if not under specialties as Mr. Connolly had mentioned.  Mr. Connolly stated that it was on the contract documents and they are obligated to install everything that is on his contract documents. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh addressed the Village Attorney, Mr. Rogers, and asked if they sign off on anything like this other than the unforeseen, how they would protect the Village so that they can’t come back with any changes.  Mr. Connolly stated that was why the Village hired him so that he can make sure that they are doing everything that is on those contract documents.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that Mr. Connolly wasn’t the one that is guaranteeing what they are putting out.  Mr. Connolly stated that he was guaranteeing that they are installing what’s on those drawings, so if it’s not on his drawings it doesn’t get installed.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that she understands that, but for her, if they are saying concrete work is $11,000 and there is no other concrete work being done and for the other bidders to have it four times as much she can’t see that.  Mr. Connolly stated that they should take the whole list away from the Village Council and just look at the bottom line because they are all right on top of one another and it is hard to dissect their numbers.

 

Councilwoman Walsh asked Mr. Rogers what the protections are that they can put in place legally for this to happen.  Mr. Rogers stated that it sounds like the protections are in the contract documents, but if there was a challenge to the price and a request for a change order or some other type of deviation, or change in terms of the work that is to be performed, they would have to look to the documents to try and identify where the particular issue is.  Just like any other contract that has detail to it; they are obligated to perform on accordance with their bid that was accepted.  Their experience is that there are deviations sometimes, and the detail on this is much more significant than you would normally find.  They have had some historic preservation work in the past with the train station plaza, and there were some issues with those but they may not have been as detailed in terms of the specifications.  You rely on those things to ensure that they are as sound as you can possibly get and you do whatever you can to protect it.

 

Mr. Connolly stated that he works for the Village and he is going to make sure that what is on those drawings is what the Village is going to get for that cost.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that Mr. Connolly would get that information to the Village Council tomorrow and then they would add it to next week’s agenda.

 

Councilman Sedon made a motion to suspend the Work Session and convene a Special Public Meeting.  Councilwoman Walsh seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        Councilman Voigt

ABSTAIN:      None

 

  1. SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETING - SEE SEPARATE MINUTES

 

Mayor Hache called for a motion to adjourn, there was a motion by Councilman Sedon to adjourn the Special Public Meeting and reconvene the Work Session.   Mayor Hache seconded the motion.

 

Roll Call Vote

 

AYES:             Councilmembers Knudsen, Sedon, Walsh, and Mayor Hache

NAYS:            None

ABSENT:        Councilman Voigt

ABSTAIN:      None

 

  1. DISCUSSION

 

  1. Ridgewood Water

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – 2020 Ford Escape

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is a resolution in the amount is $26,349 for the purchase of a 2020 Ford Escape through the Sourcewell Cooperative Pricing National Auto Fleet Group of Watsonville, California.  It will replace resolution 19-158 which was adopted on June 12, 2019.  The date to order a 2019 model had expired so this is for a 2020 model.  Mayor Hache asked about the difference in price between the Police Department vehicles and the Water Department vehicle.  Ms. Mailander stated that she was told that the floor mats and the cargo mat made the difference in the price, but she would confirm that.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that the sticker price may be one thing, but they may be getting a discount.  Mayor Hache stated that $1,500 was too much for the floor and cargo mats that they were proposing on the police vehicles.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would figure out the pricing and let the Village Council know.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Pumps and Motors – Repair, Replacement and Installation – NSI Neal Systems

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this resolution is to purchase items related to the maintenance of pumps and motors and to award it under the North Jersey Wastewater Cooperative Pricing Systems of Newtown, PA not to exceed $26,000.  The materials are for the calibration of meters.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Pumps and Motors – Repair, Replacement and Installation – Universal Electric Motor

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for state purchase from Universal Electric Motor of Hackensack.  This is not to exceed $20,000 and is for repair and replacement of electric pumps and is under the North Jersey Wastewater Cooperative Pricing System.

 

  1. Parking

 

  1. Request for Loading Zone at Train Station

 

Ms. Mailander stated that there is a request for the loading zone at the Train Station.  The Village has an agreement with a vendor to operate the coffee stand at the Train Station, and that person recently received a ticket while setting up for the day’s customers early one morning.  The vendor’s employee did not have a parking permit nor would they qualify for one as they are not a Ridgewood resident.  There is a picture where there is a space that is not striped as a parking stall, so they are recommending that this be designated as a loading zone for the coffee concession stand and later for the deliveries that Social Services receives for its facility.

 

Mayor Hache asked if it would be marked as a loading zone.  Ms. Mailander stated that it would be, and it would be short term as loading zones are.

 

  1. Reserved Parking Spaces at the Train Station

 

Ms. Mailander stated that one reserved parking space is for the New Jersey Transit representative per the agreement with New Jersey Transit.  The other parking space would be for the operator of the concession stand and then Social Services.  The concession stand would have it until 10:30 A.M. and then Social Services would use it after that.

 

Mayor Hache asked if the spaces were in the agreements for the concession stand or Social Services.  Ms. Mailander stated that it wasn’t in their agreements.  Mayor Hache stated that he thought they should consider memorializing this agreement as being part of what is included.  Ms. Mailander stated that in addition to doing this, Mr. Rogers could perhaps write up an agreement for this one space to be shared by Social Services and the concession stand.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked how much of the day they will be using that space.  Ms. Mailander stated that in the loading zone she didn’t know, but this is for a parking space.

 

  1. Request to Amend Parking Ordinance – Monte Vista Avenue

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for Monte Vista Avenue, Park Slope, North Hillside Place, and Madison Place.  The proposed parking changes were sent out to 57 residents of the area and they received 12 responses.  The majority was in favor of the change to 4 hours, but there were some other preferences. 

 

Mayor Hache stated that the reason this was brought to them was with the commuters and he agreed that Saturday wasn’t necessary.  Councilman Sedon stated that there are usually spaces in the Train Station parking lot on Saturday, adding that he would be good with Monday through Friday unless Saturday is a problem in the future.  There is also wide support for four hours which gives enough time for service people and cuts down on confusion if it is throughout the neighborhood.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that inevitably people park in front of your house because it is a public street, and she agreed with the majority regarding Saturday.  Everyone was in agreement about the four hour parking limit.

 

  1. Budget

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Replacement of Carpeting at Several Village Hall Locations

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they re-carpeted several of the rooms in this building, some of them being the court room and several offices.  The next phase of that work will include the Village Clerk’s Office, Assessor’s Office, Violations, Water Department, and Building Department, in an amount not to exceed $44,122.92.  Brothers Flooring of Hackensack is under state contract and they do have this budgeted in the capital budget.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Two 2019 Chevrolet Tahoes – Police Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Police Department placed an order for two 2019 Chevrolet Tahoes with Day Chevrolet under the New Jersey State Purchasing Program.  They had to be ordered before April 15th in order to beat the closing of Chevrolet’s open ordering/production time because the State Contract expired May 1st

 

The Village submitted a Letter of Intent to Purchase contingent on the availability of funds.  The total amount is not to exceed $73,648.08.  There are also other vendors to outfit the cars.  The Tahoes will replace patrol cars #15 and #21, which are 2015 Ford Explorers and have exceeded their usable time as police cars.  Some of the equipment in those old cars will be used in the new ones.

 

Regional Communications will be used for emergency light and police car equipment supply and installation, and Motorola Solutions for multi-band car radios.  These are three separate resolutions.

 

  1. Award Contract – Change Order No. 1 – Train Station Parking Expansion

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they expanded the Train Station parking and realized it was a good time to complete several sections of the Gamewell fiber optic communications cable since it will be needed in the new parking garage.  They also relocated the traffic signal pole to improve the site radius as well as connected the signal’s electric supply to a meter circuit.  When it came time to resurface the lot it became apparent additional asphalt and milling was necessary.  The change order is in the amount of $64,361.95.  She pointed out that even with the change order it is still $69,000 less than the second lowest bidder.

 

  1. Declare Surplus – Police Department/Parking Enforcement – Two Ford Crown Victoria’s

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this resolution was to declare property surplus for two Police Department 2011 Ford Crown Victoria’s.  They are in need of repairs with estimated costs exceeding the value of the vehicles, including the engine and air conditioning.  The expense to repair them exceeds the value of the vehicles, so they will be declared surplus.

 

  1. Parking Capital Bond Ordinance – Two Ford Escapes – Police Department/Parking Enforcement

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they need to write a bond ordinance for this, in the amount of $57,000 which will introduce and then they can award the contract after the adoption and effective date.

 

  1. General Capital Bond Ordinance – Purchase of Ford F350 Pickup – Traffic & Signal Division & 2019 Ford Ranger – Parks

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the purchase of the Ford F350 Pickup is for both the Traffic and Signal Division and a 2019 Ford Ranger for the Parks and Recreation Division.  For the Parks and Recreation Division, it is for the Supervisor to perform his day to day operations, transporting personnel and equipment, as well as checking on the condition of parks and fields.  It is a 2019 Ford Ranger through the Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing, National Auto Fleet Group of California, in an amount not to exceed $52,226.

 

The Traffic and Signal Ford F-350 Pickup will be purchased instead of the van that the contract was awarded for previously.  They were told by the Bond Council that they needed a different ordinance for the purchase of these vehicles, because the van is not the same lifespan or type of vehicle as the pickup.  Their recommendation was for a new bond ordinance and when that is adopted they can award both of these contracts.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if they knew the year of the van that is being replaced.  Ms. Mailander stated part of it is they are going to add it to snowplowing, as well.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they usually have more information.  Ms. Mailander stated that she would get this information for her. 

 

Councilwoman Walsh asked if they were prohibited as a municipality from having a direct relationship with Ford.  Ms. Mailander stated that they would have to bid it, but that is why they go with State Contract Cooperative Purchasing. Councilwoman Walsh stated that she was asking because her company has contracted with Ford and they get a rebate check back from Ford each year and it is pretty substantial.  Mr. Rogers stated that local public contract law would not allow for that.  The only way they are able to do this so quickly is because Ford has qualified for the State Contract, so they go through that purchasing level rather than bidding it out.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that these prices are more than what she was paying at her company.  Ms. Mailander stated that is what happens with public purchasing, unfortunately.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that sometimes there are differences with heavy duty or special equipment.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that the Village was overpaying for the vehicles.

 

  1. General Capital Bond Ordinance – Re-Appropriating Funds – Purchase of Scarab Windrow Turner

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was re-appropriating funds for the purchase of a scarab windrow turner that is used at the Lakeview Composting Facility.  It is currently non-operational and is well beyond its useful life and repairs would be cost prohibitive.  It was determined that several previously approved Capital projects were no longer required and were completed with excess funds available.  The reappropriation of funds from these projects may be utilized for this purchase. 

 

  1. Increase Fire Prevention Inspection Fees

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Fire Department proposal is to increase the fees which haven’t been increased in eight years and it will put us more in line with other towns in Bergen County.  The State bills for the life hazard building inspections and gives the Village a percentage of the fees they collect.  Life Hazard Building inspections are inspections of bars, BYOB restaurants, and supermarkets.  Most of these increases are minimal.

 

Chief Van Goor stated that both the Fire Department and the State perform inspections.  The State charges and they increased their fees at the beginning of the year.  The Fire Department looked back at the ordinance to see if we had to change the ordinance based on that and realized we hadn’t changed our fees since 2011.  The Fire Department came up with increases because it has been eight years since there were increases. 

 

Inspector Krug stated that they were given leeway with how they wanted to address their fee schedule, and he reached out to towns with populations that are similar or slightly over.  Some of the proposed increases are smoke detector certifications, which they currently charge $75 for.  Recently, as of January 1st, the State has added to the code and increased the Village’s workload with that.  They find that the inspections take a minimum of two visits there, and they are looking to increase the fees to $100 which puts them in line with surrounding towns.  The other inspections that he has are businesses within the business district.  When they are talking about the Life Hazard Uses, BYOB fees are set by the State.  As an inspector, he goes out and performs the inspections and the State collects that fee and then reimburses the town.  Most of the fee changes have to do with mercantile stores, offices and multi-family dwellings. 

 

Instead of billing within the windows of units he would like to have a flat fee of $100 and then bill per number of units on that property.  Inspector Krug stated that he liked having the flat fee because in the past they have been billing a garden apartment complex, with seven buildings, $270 in the past, but if you really think about it, it is seven different structures.  They receive seven different fire alarm test reports, seven different sprinkler reports, and deal with issues in seven different buildings.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that it makes sense to her as they are doing multiple works so they are right to approach it that way.  Mayor Hache stated that looking at the changes depending on the size of the business.  As the range of percentage increases going from 13% to 18% with the higher increases at the lower end and then for the mercantile the range of increases is 13% to 25%, and the 25% is at the lower end.  It seems that there is a big disparity there between them, but looking at the fire safety permits it looks pretty consistent.  Mayor Hache asked if they could be more consistent with the increases.  Inspector Krug stated that it was going up $10.  Mayor Hache stated that the percentages were about a 29% increase.  Chief Van Goor stated that those fees are set by the State of New Jersey.  Mayor Hache stated that the standard was applied unevenly and when looking at the fees that the Village is imposing, it’s not consistent.  Inspector Krug stated that there is an option where the Village could introduce an ordinance that says they just follow the State’s inspection fees and go that route.  These types of permits are for special events such as food trucks or a tent on your property.

 

Mayor Hache stated that the increases that are proposed here range from 13% to 18% with 18% at the low end.  Looking at the second category the range is 13% to 25%, and he was asking if there was a way to get the percentage increase more in line.  Inspector Krug stated that they could look at that.  Mayor Hache asked if the consideration was in terms of keeping in line with the dollar increases that the State has.  Inspector Krug stated that it was to keep it in line with other towns, and he would see that discrepancy within the current fees, as well.  He added that when he worked with the Chief he came up with the average increase of 16%, and some of that is just due to rounding out figures.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that looking at the increase at 0-500 square feet, the increase is $10 but looking at a large square footage the increase is $40, and even though that percentage isn’t actually greater, there must be more involved in that particular location.  Mayor Hache asked if it was more work to do a smaller building than a larger one.  Chief Van Goor stated that there is a lot more scheduling involved in smaller inspections, chasing down owners, phone calls, and arranging appointments.  For a larger building, it is easier to meet just a building director.  Mayor Hache stated that then these amounts are not arbitrary, but are correlated to the amount of work that is necessary for those structures.  There was additional discussion about the size of buildings and the percent increase.  Chief Van Goor stated that every inspection is done differently.  The only thing that is uniform is the code that he enforces.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Six Panasonic Tough Books – Police Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that there are several different computer and printer related contracts to award.  This is for six Toughbooks for the Police department.  Wireless Communications is a vendor through state contract, with a cost not to exceed $30,847.80.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Server Upgrade

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for a server upgrade for the E-Ticket program and new Finance Server to replace the current system.  This is under State Contract to Dell of Round Rock, Texas in an amount not to exceed $41,695.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Printer Upgrades and Replacements

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for printer upgrades and replacements for Finance, Water, Engineering, Police, and EMS.  The quote is for 13 printers in total and will be under State Contract to SHI of Somerset, not to exceed $24,079.81.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Ruggedized Switches and Network Upgrades – Various Departments

 

Ms. Mailander stated that ruggedized switches are meant for areas of high and low humidity such as Graydon Pool, Pump Houses, Storage Areas, and Lockboxes.  This is under state contract to SHI of Somerset not to exceed $18,154.60.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Aruba Switches and Network Upgrades – Various Departments

 

Ms. Mailander stated this was to handle the increase of data.  Separate certain data points to elevate possible bottlenecking and increase efficiency on backups by creating a management network.  With the onset of utilizing ip based phones, security cameras, and other node, the increase of bandwidth is needed in order for the network to run at an optimal state.  The current switches are between 4 and 8 years of age and are showing some signs of degradation.  The State Contract is to SHI of Somerset, not to exceed $92,239.14.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Public Access and Wifi Upgrade – Village Facilities and Park Locations

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was for Wifi equipment and to expand coverage in Village facilities/park locations.  This contract is with SHI of Somerset, not to exceed $28,151.00.  Mayor Hache asked if the wifi upgrade was going to include Van Neste Square in the scope.  Mr. Hansen stated that it would.

 

  1. Award State Purchasing Contract – Renewal of Annual Spatial Data Logic Software License

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is for the renewal of spatial data logic software license for one year.  IT is currently used by the Building Department for permits and zoning and the Health Department for pet licensing.  They will be looking into integrating the system into the ESRI Project.  The price for renewal is $31,250 and will be awarded under stated contract to SHI of Somerset.

 

  1. Award Contract – Leaf Collection Services for Area B – Public Works Department

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they bid out the leaf pickup for Area B and had two planholders eligible to bid and received one bid.  The sole bid was $79,800.00.  The proposal calls for the contractor to make three pickups in section B, collect the leaves, and then transport them to the Lakeview Compost Facility.  The bidder was Faircut Services of Montville, and this is a first year for them.  For the past two years, the contracts were $88,500 and $92,460.  Councilwoman Sedon asked if they were fully aware of the scope of work that’s involved, and asked if there was any way it could go up.  Ms. Mailander stated that they have to do it at this price and do not get a change order.  They also assign an employee to check up on section B to make sure that they are being picked up in a timely manner.  This is a new vendor and they are looking forward to working with them.

 

  1. Declare Surplus – Streets Department – Paving Box

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is to declare a paving box surplus, and then once it is declared surplus it will be sold on GovDeals.com.

 

  1. Resolution Cancelling General Capital Ordinance Balances

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is a resolution cancelling general capital ordinance balances.  The CFO and the Treasurer have revised all general capital bond ordinances, some have been completed or circumstances have changed.  There are balances that are left from purchases that have already been made.  They are going to cancel as shown in the attachment, which will result in a reduction in deferred charges unfunded and monies being restored to the General Capital Fund Balance.

 

  1. Award Professional Services Contract – Professional Planning Consultant

 

Ms. Mailander stated that they were working to correct a diversion of open spaces in the Village of Ridgewood. Topology NJ of Newark was hired last year to provide professional consulting services on this matter.  There is a need to extend this professional agreement to help guide this issue to final resolution with Green Acres.  It will be an amount not to exceed $35,000.  They will prove valuable as the Village moves through the application process, which was recommended by Green Acres.  Once through the application process, ultimately you have to be approved by the State Legislature.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that she didn’t understand whether or not they were trying to take a different approach with this as they made applications in good faith and are being held up by this even though the property still went to public use.  She added that she didn’t know where it was written that they could hold this money up, and asked if they looked into that at all.  Mr. Rogers stated that he has not looked into the legality of whether they have the authority to withhold the funding that our taxpayers contribute, but he assumes they would.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that this is something that happened decades ago and here the Village taxpayers are taking a hit. 

 

Mr. Rogers stated that he thought their position was arbitrary in the beginning when they say that the amount of money that was spent on Schedler and Habernickel doesn’t get considered with regard to this because those two events happened long after the property in question and the diversion was utilized.  They thought about challenging it but at that time determined not to and the decision hasn’t been revisited.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they are spending more money here and the taxpayers are still the ones being denied.  Mr. Rogers stated that if it was something she wanted him to do he would be glad to.  There was a consensus among the Village Council.  Ms. Mailander stated that with the consultant they only pay them when they use them.  Councilwoman Knudsen reiterated her sentiments, as if they were acting in good faith and this was pulled out of the blue for the Village to look into and determine if they should be considering other alternatives.

 

  1. Shared Services Agreement – Municipal Court Administrator and Deputy Municipal Court Administrator (Glen Rock)

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Village’s Municipal Court Administrator retired on August 1st.  The Administrative Office of the Courts in Hackensack is strongly encouraging Municipal Courts to create Shared Services Agreements with other Municipal Courts.  The Borough of Glen Rock’s Municipal Court Administrator, Kimberly McWilliams, is currently the Village’s Alternate Municipal Court Administrator.  The Borough of Glen Rock was approached about a Shared Services Agreement with the Village, whereby Glen Rock will provide a Municipal Court Administrator and Ridgewood will provide a Deputy Municipal Court Administrator and the use of our two clerical staff, as well as allow Glen Rock to use the Village’s video conferencing system to communicate with the jails and correctional facilities.  The Borough of Glen Rock has agreed to a Shared Services Agreement as outlined, for a fee of $50,000 a year.  It will allow each municipal court to remain in their respective municipalities.  The Deputy Court Administrator and the two staff may have to be at Glen Rock.  They are looking to start it September 1st.  This also needs an agreement and approval from the Assignment Judge of Bergen County.

 

Ms. Mailander stated that Shared Services are a great thing and the courts in Bergen County will ultimately be forced into sharing.  The Village is looking forward to doing this with Glen Rock.

 

  1. Shared Services Agreement – Floodplain Protection Planning Services (Bergen County)

 

Ms. Mailander stated that in May the Village Council authorized her to execute a Declaration of Interest Form in order to proceed with Floodplain Protection Planning Services.  The Bergen County Freeholders have adopted a resolution to authorize the Shared Services Agreement to have this plan developed through The Land Conservancy of New Jersey and The Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program for the Village, at no cost to the Village.

 

The Village Council now has to adopt a resolution to authorize the Shared Services Agreement, submit it to the County, and then The Land Conservancy of New Jersey and The Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program will be able to begin working on the plan.

 

  1. Ordinance to Amend Salary Ordinances for Supervisors, Non-Union, Blue Collar, and White Collar Employees

 

Ms. Mailander stated that these are either titles which they had not used before and are now setting salary ranges for them, or titles where they adjusted the salary ranges.  This is a clean-up ordinance.

 

  1. Policy

 

  1. Request to Amend Chapter 212 – Tennis Courts – Rules and Regulations

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the current rules and regulations will remain, which is that you have to have a permit tag to be displayed on request, you have an application, a registration, collecting fees.  She read through the rules and regulations that were now added. 

 

  1. Amending Chapter 190 Land Use Development – Illuminated Signs in Business District

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was sent to the Village Council by the Planning Board.  This does expire on December 31st, so she would like to get it adopted by the end of the year.  They can bring it back September 4th, but she would like to proceed with it at that time.  There was a consensus that the Village Council was willing to introduce it as proposed by the Planning Board.

 

  1. Flagpole Ordinance

 

Ms. Mailander stated that Mr. Rogers put together a memorandum of the issues that should be considered for the recently installed flagpole at Memorial Park at Van Neste Square.  Mr. Rogers stated that this was if the Village Council wanted to take action and regulate the use of the flagpole.  He added that there are recognized constitutional issues with regards to any flags that are placed on the flagpole that can’t be regulated with regard to content or what they are showing.  There are a number of things that can be discussed.  There is a weight limit on the flagpole, so the Village Council can think about the type of material of flag, the size of the flag to be displayed, the number of flags that can be permitted on this flagpole at any one time, the time period that the flag is going to be flown, and the duration.  Consideration has to be given for other flags or opportunities for other flags to be flown if there is a request.  They should consider setting up a system or a permit to be requested so that they can fill out the information and the specifications with regard to the flag.  He reviewed the memorandum and additional recommendations regarding permits and timeframes.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen asked if someone comes in with Flag A and has to get a permit and there is a fee associated with the permit, who is hoisting the flag onto the flagpole.  Mr. Rogers stated that he believes that the Village would, but it could certainly be discussed and those are some of the things that can be built into the permit fee.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked what if there was a month when someone wanted their flag there for a month but a second, third, or fourth flag comes in then maybe if everyone has their permit in on time then maybe the month gets split.  Mr. Rogers stated that was one of the reasons you may not want to fly something for the whole month, but say two week intervals.  He had a conversation a few months ago with Mr. Rutishauser with regard to weight limits of the flagpole and what can be done.  Mayor Hache stated that the size and number would be determined by the specs of the flagpole.  Mr. Rogers pointed out that those were areas that you could regulate where safety trumps constitutional issues.

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that the type of flag is going to be the easy piece.  Getting the fee for the Village staff to put the flag up and review the application, she felt they should tailor similar to the trestle sign. Mr. Rogers stated that what they do with holiday displays is to advise people they can’t apply before a certain date or after a certain date.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that people would need time to get the flag, as well.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that if she has a flag that says Happy Birthday Mike because that is her free speech, you can do that.  The train trestle is reserved for non-profits, so there are rules assigned there, but in this instance they are saying anything goes.  Councilman Sedon stated that there would not be a challenge to the content unless someone put up something that was offensive.

 

Mr. Rogers stated that safety was the issue, so if there was a flag that would promote anarchy, or puts people in peril, or deals with issues of safety, then there is a possibility that you can regulate that.  He can certainly work up the wording that would cover that type of circumstance.  Other than that, Mike’s Birthday would be known by everyone.  Councilwoman Knudsen asked what type of flag would promote anarchy.  Mr. Rogers stated that the only thing that comes to mind was a flag that said kill everyone, which would be something that would be precluded from going up there.  Councilman Sedon asked if they could do anything about offensive language.  Mr. Rogers stated that free speech is designed to prevent people from being offensive, so you have to be careful when you’re talking about that.

 

Councilwoman Walsh stated that in states where they flew the confederate flag, there must be change to their ordinances that could be reviewed to reflect that change.  So, maybe they should look into how it was worded.  Mr. Rogers agreed.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that they put up the United States flag instead.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that someone found the Betsy Ross flag, and Mr. Rogers stated that was why you stay away from offensive in the wording. Councilman Sedon stated that he was at an event a number of years ago but someone was handing out stickers that said F Cancer, which is a positive message but it is packaged with an offensive word.  Mr. Rogers stated that in terms of regulating the wording, that aspect of it has been dealt with by the courts a number of times, and they give direction as to what you can and cannot do.

 

Councilman Sedon stated that on the permitting, he was thinking about the same thing that Councilwoman Walsh was about the train trestle sign and suggested Mr. Rogers look at that wording.  Mr. Rogers stated that they do have regulations with regard to the holiday displays and they need time to process the permit and make sure that you are going to be able to accommodate the request as best you can.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that if the pole can maintain two flags they should always have the second be the American Flag, because if two flags are approved you could have opposing positions and then you are missing the point.  Mr. Rogers stated that doesn’t take any type of precedent.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that the American Flag always has to be on top.  Councilwoman Walsh agreed.  Councilman Sedon stated that he would just say only one flag at a time.  Councilwoman Knudsen stated that if it is going to be one flag, in the sense of equal opportunity, then you have to narrow your window of opportunity for that flag to fly because you might have overlap.  Councilwoman Walsh stated that it is just like the trestle with first come first served.  Mr. Rogers stated that the trestle is regulated by the space, whereas this isn’t regulated at all.  Ms. Mailander suggested they come up with some kind of proposed ordinance for the future and bring it back to the Village Council.  

 

  1. Green Team and REAC

 

Councilman Sedon stated that there is an obvious synergy between the Green Team and REAC, all they are doing for REAC is changing the name to Green Ridgewood.  After he pulled the Village Code, the biggest changes being made were changing all the names from REAC to Green Ridgewood and then removing language that designates an alternate and making everyone a member.  The Green Team originally was put together as a sub-committee for REAC, but they want to be recertified next year.  So, around January, the Green Team is going to split off from REAC and get the Village certified again for Sustainable Jersey.  The members checked with Sustainable Jersey, and they seemed fine with it.  These are minor changes to clean up these two ordinances and reflect what is going on right now with the committees.

 

Ms. Mailander asked if REAC was just changing its name to Green Ridgewood Committee, and then the Green Team is going to remain as is.  The only change to the ordinance is establishing it, so that anything that mentions it is going to say Green Ridgewood Committee, but they remain as two separate committees.  Councilman Sedon stated that they would remain as two separate committees because you don’t have to register every year with Sustainable Jersey. So, that way, it allows the Green Team to splinter off and focus on the application and then of course, if Green Ridgewood can support the Sustainable Jersey pieces of it.  Mayor Hache asked if designating the members from alternate to regular was just for Green Ridgewood.  Councilman Sedon stated that it was just Green Ridgewood members.  He added that it is just a rebrand for a green year with the plastic bag ban and Earth Day.  Ms. Mailander stated they would have these two ordinances with the changes made.  

 

  1. Operations

 

  1. 2020 Village Council Meeting Schedule

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this year there are a lot of different holidays that interfere with their regular meeting days.  The recommendation is to move each meeting forward in January, and in February they are moving those meetings forward one week, as well.  In April, the second Wednesday is the first night of Passover, and so they are recommending that those be moved forward one week.  July 1, is a Wednesday, so they are moving it forward one week.  In November, Veterans Day is Wednesday and so they are recommending that they move that one to a Monday because the following week is the League of Municipalities Conference.  All the other dates remain the same.  She also wanted to move the Coffee with the Council date to September 12, 2020.

 

  1. Approve Grant Application – New Jersey Department of Transportation

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this is an annual Municipal Aid grant that the Village applies for and put in to received funds to resurface South Broad Street from East Ridgewood Avenue to the municipal line with Glen Rock.  Part of the grant application process is that they need a resolution to approve it and submit with the application.

 

  1. 2020 Municipal Aid Grant – Engineering Division

 

  1. Major Soil Permit – Hudson Street Parking Lot

 

Ms. Mailander stated that the Engineering Division’s conditions for the major soil moving permit were discussed at the Planning Board last night.  They have been incorporated into the resolution and trucking routes will be carefully coordinated with the Village’s Police Department.  They received a letter from the Planning Board that they did discuss this last night and recommended that the governing body issue the major soil moving permit.

  1. Resident Survey

 

Ms. Mailander stated that during the budget discussions, she mentioned that the Borough of Fair Lawn had conducted a resident survey several years ago, to determine what was and was not important to residents.  They then used this information to determine priorities for budgeting.  She suggested sending it out in September and then getting it back in late October.  She reviewed the questions that Fair Lawn asked, and what the Village could possibly ask.

 

Mayor Hache stated that when you are asking questions it is important to have the context so if you ask someone how do you feel about rear yard pickup, and would they love it if they knew what the savings could be.  He added it was important to have the context of the numbers behind it.  He asked how this survey was distributed.  Ms. Mailander stated that they mailed it, but it could certainly be distributed.  Mayor Hache suggested including a unique number so they could assure there were no duplicates.  Ms. Mailander stated that they did not accept anonymous surveys, and one survey per household.  She also suggested doing it similar to how it was done with the Master Plan. 

 

Councilwoman Knudsen stated that if you don’t allow anonymous you aren’t allowing a filter for the information; a lot of people feel very uncomfortable completing a survey and putting their name on it, especially if they are senior citizens.  Ms. Mailander added that she would talk to Bob Rooney to see if he had any related budget questions that maybe they could charge for, or get an idea of whether people value that service.  Councilwoman Knudsen added that it is important that this is a very small piece of the municipal tax dollars, as they need to recalculate those percentages because the BOE budget has gone up significantly at a greater pace than the Village’s municipal budget.

 

  1. FEMA Flood Map Inclusions

 

Ms. Mailander stated that there are new flood maps that are going to be effective on August 28, 2019 and they have a significant incongruity or error in them.  The area of concern is along the Ho-Ho-Kus Brook, from First Street southward on either side of North Maple Avenue to the brook itself.  It looks like approximately 33 additional properties will be in the flood plain.  Engineering has checked the elevation of the newly included properties and feels there is a significant error being created by the FEMA/FIRM maps.  There are some property owners who may be considering a legal challenge to this to have the mapping corrected.  Therefore, the Village Engineer has indicated that perhaps the Village may be interested in joining the residents to have the mapping corrected due to the number of effected properties, subject to Mr. Roger’s legal opinion.

 

Mr. Rogers stated that he hasn’t had a chance to talk to Mr. Rutishauser about it yet, but he thinks the Village’s position would be much different than the individual property owners.  There is certainly a mechanism out there for a municipality to challenge any type of error and see if they can define the error and what may happen.  He suggested they support the best they can but don’t join or become a party to any lawsuit that is started by a property owner.  The Village should try to deal with this administratively with FEMA to correct whatever error is there, so that they are doing their part to try to help the residents.

 

  1. REVIEW OF AUGUST 14, 2019 PUBLIC MEETING AGENDA

 

Ms. Mailander stated that this was a review of the August 14, 2019 Public Meeting Agenda.

 

Proclamations: Commemorate 100th Anniversary of Ridgewood’s American Legion Post 53 and Honor Its Mission as a Patriotic Veterans Organization Devoted to Mutual Helpfulness; Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over 2019 Statewide Crackdown; Declare September Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month; and Declare September National Preparedness Month.

 

There are no ordinances for introduction or public hearing for Ridgewood Water.

 

Resolutions for Ridgewood Water include: Award Contract Under Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing Contract – 2020 Ford Escape; Award Contract Under North Jersey Wastewater Cooperative Purchasing Contract – Installation and Replacement of Pumps and Motors; and Award Contract Under North Jersey Wastewater Cooperative Purchasing Contract – Installation and Replacement of Pumps and Motors.

 

The following ordinances are scheduled for introduction: 3729 – Bond Ordinance – Acquisition of Vehicles for Parking Utility; 3732 – Bond Ordinance – Acquisition of Vehicles – Parks Department and Traffic & Signal Department; 3733 – Bond Ordinance – Reappropriating Funds for Scarab Windrow Turner; 3734 – Establish Loading Zone at Train Station Parking Lot; 3735 – Establish Reserved Parking Spaces at Train Station Parking Lot – NJ Transit and Concession Stand/Social Services; 3736 – Amend Chapter 265 – Vehicles and Traffic – Time Limit Parking on Monte Vista, Park Slope, Madison Place and North Hillside Avenue; 3737 – Amend Fire Prevention Inspection Fees; 3738 – Amend Various Salary Ordinances; and 3739 – Amend Chapter 212 – Tennis Courts – Rules and Regulations.

 

The scheduled public hearings include: 3728 – Designate Parking Spaces in Train Station Lot for Hudson Street Lot Permit Holders; 3730 – Amend Chapter 190 – Land Use and Development – Swimming Pools; and 3731 – Amend Chapter 190 – Land Use and Development – Permit Real Estate Open House Signs.

 

Resolutions include: Title 59 Approval – Leaf Collection Services; Award Contract – Leaf Collection Services; Award Contract Under State Contract – Carpeting for Various Offices in Village Hall; Award Contract Under State Contract – 2 Chevrolet Tahoes – Police Department; Award Contract Under State Contract – Mobile Radios for Police Vehicles; Award Contract Under State Contract – Furnishing and Delivering Patrol Equipment for Police Vehicles; Award Contract Under State Contract – Panasonic Tough Books – Police Department; Award Contract Under State Contract – Server Upgrade; Award Contract Under State Contract – Printer Upgrades and Replacements; Award Contract Under State Contract – Ruggedized Network Switches; Award Contract Under State Contract – Aruba Switches and Network Upgrades; Award Contract Under State Contract – Wi-Fi Access Points; Award Contract Under State Contract – Renewal of Spatial Data Logic Software; Award Professional Services Contract – Professional Planning Consultant – Green Acres Diversion; Authorize Change Order – Train Station Parking Expansion; Authorize Change Order – Resurfacing Glen Tennis Court; Authorize Shared Services Agreement – Municipal Court Administrator and Deputy Municipal Court Administrator (Glen Rock); Authorize Shared Services Agreement – Floodplain Protection Planning Services (Bergen County); Approve Submission of NJDOT Grant Application and Authorize Execution of Grant Agreement – South Broad Street Resurfacing; Authorize Major Soil Moving Permit – Hudson Street Parking Lot; Declare Property Surplus – Police Department Vehicles; Declare Property Surplus – Streets Department Paving Box; and Cancel General Capital Ordinance Balances.

 

  1. COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

 

Boyd Loving, 342 South Irving Street, stated that he was listening with some interest to the discussion about the two parking spaces that are in front of Westside Bagels, and the first thing that came to his mind was how did two parking spaces get installed at that location and nobody knows about it as it was all done unofficially.  He wondered how many other parking spaces are there in the Village that are unlawful and were not created by ordinance.  He asked if this was a process that the Village Council was going to undertake now to ensure that there were no other rogue parking spaces.  He asked how many summonses that were issued for people who parked there, as those have to be invalid.  As the spaces aren’t legit, how could you issue a summons to someone.  Mr. Loving stated that people are putting money in the meters but the spaces aren’t authorized, and he asked if they could continue to collect revenue for spaces that aren’t on the books. He understands that the businesses don’t want those spaces removed but they are unlawful.  He reiterated his sentiments and added that it seems like a big mess to him and he is concerned that there didn’t seem to be any urgency in their voices that this needs to be fixed right away and he suggested talking with Mr. Rogers regarding any summonses that had been issued regarding those two spots.

 

There were no additional comments from the public.

 

Mayor Hache stated that Mr. Loving raised some interesting and important questions.  Mr. Rogers stated that he found out about the lack of enacting an ordinance yesterday or today from Susan and she asked the same questions.  He doesn’t know that there is a need for urgency regarding tonight’s discussion but the steps have been taken to make sure that enforcement on those gets directed in the proper way.  If someone wants to challenge the issuance of a summons they can do that.  The aspect of how long it has been there and as far as he remembers those spaces have been striped there.  There may be others in the ordinances, but the Manager’s office is prepared to handle those things.

 

Councilwoman Knudsen added that all this predates the current Village Council and was uncovered by chance.  Mayor Hache stated that they can use the inventory of the meters and compare it to established ordinances.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. RESOLUTION TO GO INTO CLOSED SESSION

 

Deputy Village Clerk, Donna Jackson read Resolution #19-252 to go into Closed Session as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. ADJOURNMENT

 

There being no further business to come before the Village Council, on a motion by Councilman Sedon, seconded by Councilwoman Knudsen, and carried unanimously by voice vote, the Village Council’s Work Session was adjourned at 10:44 P.M.

 

 

 

 

______________________________

                                                                                                      Ramon M. Hache, Sr.                              

                                                                                                                        Mayor                          

 

______________________________

              Donna M. Jackson

           Deputy Village Clerk

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